Testing Hops

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GLish830

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So I am really new to brewing, 1 batch. I started with the purpose of learning all the flavors. I am not really interested in brewing clones. I love getting into the weeds on things. I have brewed one batch and want to learn the flavors of all kinds of different hops. I have an all in one that brews 3-7 gallons. I was thinking of how to start a 5 gallon and turning it into 5 different 1 gallon batches all with different hops, so 5, one gallon smash brews or even smaller. So, would I stop brewing after my 60 minute mash and then just transfer a gallon to a big pot on the stove, boil in the hops and then cool in an ice tub and then ferment in a one gallon carboy. Then repeat with another gallon. Any thoughts on this process or is there a way easier process and or am I a knucklehead for even thinking this way?
Garth
 

BrewnWKopperKat

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I [...] want to learn the flavors of all kinds of different hops

A flavor vocabulary will be helpful (link).

There is also the idea of a flavor wheel for each variety of hop. For example (link):
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In addition to hop teas, there are other techniques (BBR's "Hop Sampler", "Dry Hop Bud Light", ...) that could be adapted to the brewing equipment that you have.

Some SMaSH recipes can be interesting. On the other hand, adding a malt or two gets one to clone recipes for very popular single hop beers (e.g. Sierra Nevada Pale Ale for Cascade, Bell's Two Hearted for Centennial, Toppling Goliath Brewing Co. Pseudo Sue for Citra).

Scott Janish's blog (link) is one of a number of hop related blogs that are worth a scan.
 

GoodTruble

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Assuming your stove has four burners, hop teas would also allow you to prepare four different hops while you mash (saving you a lot of time).
 

PberBob

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Another easy hop screening test I like for dry hop comparisons is getting a six-pack of Coors Light or another underflavored lager and dropping a few hop pellets in each and recapping. Let them sit for a few days in the fridge. Serve with a tea strainer.

It doesn’t capture nuances of whirlpool additions or hot-side isomerization, but it’s pretty good for testing complementary hop combos.
 

hotbeer

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If the boiled wort is divided into separate fermenters then you'll only be dry hopping to see the results of different hops. What will the bittering be during the boil and how will that affect the dry hop tastes and aromas? And dry hopping has it's own set of whoopsies that impact hop flavor.

It might be useful to just do single hop IPA's an basice ale's where you only use one hop in the boil and don't dry hop at all. You can makes some pretty hoppy IPA's with no dry hopping at all. And currently I'm enjoying them.

1 to <2 gallon batches can be boiled on the kitchen stove. If you are going to have several fermenters going at once, then you could do a big mash/sparge and divide that up for boils with the various hops.
 
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leedspointbrew

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Another easy hop screening test I like for dry hop comparisons is getting a six-pack of Coors Light or another underflavored lager and dropping a few hop pellets in each and recapping. Let them sit for a few days in the fridge. Serve with a tea strainer.

It doesn’t capture nuances of whirlpool additions or hot-side isomerization, but it’s pretty good for testing complementary hop combos.
Trying that now with Northdown hops in a Coors Light. Great idea.
 
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