Temp in secondary

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evandam

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I have a Strawberry Blonde brew that uses 1007 German Ale yeast. The Wyeast sight says 55-68 deg. It will be in a bucket which I will put in a water bath and keep some ice in it. The ambient temp is gonna be 70-72. I think I can get 66-68 with the ice and water. Following is the Wyeast description.

1007
True top cropping yeast, low ester formation, broad temperature range affects styles. Cold fermentation will produce lager characteristics including sulfur production. Fermentation at higher temperatures may produce some mild fruitiness. Generally, yeast remains significantly in suspension. Beers mature rapidly, even when cold fermentation is used. Low or no detectable diacetyl.

I dont think I want lagar characteristics, and some mild fruitiness wont be bad in a straw blonde.

So the question is:
When I go to secondary how important is the temp? The reason I ask is that I have a APA that has been fermented at 65 or so and will have to come out of the bath to keep the SB in its range (It is done and will be going secondary). Also when the SB goes to secondary I may have something else to keep cool. How much does the temp in secondary mater since the yeast is pretty much done?
 

Dr_Deathweed

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you should go to secondary when fermentation is complete, so temperature is not going to matter as much. I wouldn't just put it out in the garrage durring a 110deg summer, but i wouldn't fret too much if it gets a little warm.
 

quickerNu

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+1- I don't much about secondary temps, the beer isnt really fermenting anymore, it is clearing. Just don't get too crazy, and it'll be fine.
 
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evandam

evandam

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Thanks guys, that is what I figured. The APA is done, so going to 70-72 wont kill it. I figured that, but you make me feel better.
 

Beerthoven

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I have a porter sitting in secondary in my clothes closet right now. Its about 74º in there. I'm more worried about my kids getting in there and knocking off the air lock than I am about the temp.
 

Dr_Deathweed

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Beerthoven said:
I have a porter sitting in secondary in my clothes closet right now. Its about 74º in there. I'm more worried about my kids getting in there and knocking off the air lock than I am about the temp.

That my friend, is probably one of the more valid beer concerns that I have read all day:D
 

mykayel

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If you are sure it is done and if you have room in a fridge, put it in there. The cooler temp will help the yeast settle out and the beer clear up, the whole point of a secondary.
 

GunnerMan

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Hate to resurect an old thread but I just found 3 old 5 gal bottles I found sotred. They are not "BetterBottles" they are the kind you take to the store or whatever and fill with drinking water. I think they are made of Polycarbonate. So I am pretty sure I can use these as secondary vessels..can I? Also what is the temp range? I need to keep my beer cool in a 16 gal bucket (wich is very hard) and don't have room or recources for more tubs of water. My house is about 75 degrees, is this an ok temperature for the secondary if fermentation is done?
 

WBC

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No, 75 is too high. The ale inside the fermenter is actually higher because fermentation causes heat. Fermentation is exothermic. This is why you need to keep it 66F to maintain less than 70F actual ale temperature. A water bath is necessary to keep the temperature down. If you let it stay at 70F the ale is actually higher temperature which can cause all kinds of unwated esters and fusel alcohols which make the ale taste harch. The first 2 to 3 days are the most critical as this is when the yeast are doing most of the fermentation. Refrigeration with a digital controller is the best way to control this. You may think I am going overboard and being ridiculous but I'm not.
 

quickerNu

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My house is about 75 degrees, is this an ok temperature for the secondary if fermentation is done?
I think so- if fermentation has stopped. No more heat being generated, it should equalize out to 75 as well. I do it all the time, no off flavors.

Don't use those water bottles as secondaries, (or primaries for that matter) they are too oxygen permeable. Search, you will find lots of threads with different reasons why this is a no-no.
 

GunnerMan

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Thanks for the info, WBC it was my understanding when you put your beer in the secondary fermentation should be all but stoped, I thought temperature control was only crucial during the first stages of fermentation.

Thanks on the heads up about the water bottles, I had them sittin in the garage so I figured I would utilize them as secondarys mainly so I could be brewing more batches.
 

WBC

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Thanks for the info, WBC it was my understanding when you put your beer in the secondary fermentation should be all but stoped, I thought temperature control was only crucial during the first stages of fermentation.
Temperature should be close to the fermentation. What I am trying to say is that after fermenting at 66F you should not put it out in a 90F garage. Beer is a living thing that has yeast in it and you should treat it as such. The reason for lower fermentation temps during the first 3 days is because you want to prevent excessive esters from being produced. A secondary fermenter is not needed at all for ales because they are not in that vessel very long as compared to lagers.
 
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