Quantcast

Spent Grain? Make Your Best Friend Cookies!

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

schweaty

Doe Re Mi Beer
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Sep 18, 2008
Messages
1,802
Reaction score
53
Location
Glass City
Your dog that is! Don't throw that grain away, make some doggie treats for your furry friend. They love them! Got this recipe from Beerrific a couple of days ago.

Original recipe:
4 cups spent grain
2 cups flour
1 cup peanut butter (all natural)
2 eggs



Mix all ingredients thoroughly. Press down into a dense layer on a large cookie sheet. Score almost all the way through into the shapes you want. Bake for about half an hour at 350 F to solidify them. Loosen them from the sheet, break the biscuits apart and return them, loosely spread out on the cookie sheet, to the oven at 225 F for 3 to 4 hours (or until they are really dry) to prevent mold growth. Store in an airtight container to keep them dry and mold-free.

Thanks to Beerrific for the recipe, my minature dachshunds love them! I modified the recipe a bit and cut out my cookies and then put them on a sheet at 225 for 3 hours.
 

Grinder12000

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2008
Messages
2,996
Reaction score
49
Location
Columbus WI
I've been doing that and actually selling them at a local place.

Shrink wrap 6 inch size chunks and sell then for a buck.

Doggie Beer Bars.

But now a local bakery wants the grain for bread.

I love this hobby - take something we normally feed the pigs with, give it a different cool name and sell it to humans.
 

Yooper

Ale's What Cures You!
Staff member
Admin
Mod
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jun 4, 2006
Messages
74,511
Reaction score
12,042
Location
UP/Snowbird in Florida
My dog LOVES them. I make them large and instead of scoring and breaking them, I just do them like drop cookies. I plop a big spoonful down, and press into a rectangle shape. They are his favorite treat and he goes crazy for them.

Of course, he also loves deer poop, so I don't think he's very discriminating.
 

Zymurgrafi

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2007
Messages
2,426
Reaction score
16
Location
NEK, VT
I know my dogs LOVE eating spent grain right out of the compost. I try and keep them out of it though as it is none to kind on their digestive track!

:eek:

smaller quantities are probably best
;)
 

Professor Frink

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 20, 2006
Messages
3,100
Reaction score
30
Location
Beacon, NY
My dog LOVES them. I make them large and instead of scoring and breaking them, I just do them like drop cookies. I plop a big spoonful down, and press into a rectangle shape. They are his favorite treat and he goes crazy for them.

Of course, he also loves deer poop, so I don't think he's very discriminating.
I wonder if that is like cat poop, my Maddie loves that.
 

fivehoursfree

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2008
Messages
233
Reaction score
1
hmmm, interesting. I threw some old grain into some planters and the dog ate it right off the dirt.
 

billtzk

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 5, 2007
Messages
1,617
Reaction score
23
Location
Dallas
I wonder if these spent grain treats are really good for dogs.

I think the dog food industry would tell us it is fine since their products are mostly comprised of cereal grains too. Probably many vets would say the same.

My dogs love Milk Bone treats, so I'm sure they'd love spent-grain cookies too.

But still... Dogs are carnivores by nature, not herbivores or omnivores. I've recently been feeding raw beef and chicken to my dogs. They go nuts over it. And then afterwards they want a Milk Bone... go figure.
 

Amiaji

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 19, 2008
Messages
281
Reaction score
8
Location
Denver, NC
Dogs are carnivores by nature, not herbivores or omnivores. I've recently been feeding raw beef and chicken to my dogs. They go nuts over it. And then afterwards they want a Milk Bone... go figure.
Dogs, like humans, are carnivors by nature but that doesnt meant that won't like a good spent grain dog biscuit.
 

Dr_Deathweed

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2007
Messages
2,376
Reaction score
49
Location
Bryan
I wonder if these spent grain treats are really good for dogs.

I think the dog food industry would tell us it is fine since their products are mostly comprised of cereal grains too. Probably many vets would say the same.

My dogs love Milk Bone treats, so I'm sure they'd love spent-grain cookies too.

But still... Dogs are carnivores by nature, not herbivores or omnivores. I've recently been feeding raw beef and chicken to my dogs. They go nuts over it. And then afterwards they want a Milk Bone... go figure.
Please, please, please, before you start your dog on one of these raw meat diets, talk to your vet first. Dogs really are not strict carnivores by nature, and do quite well with a fair amount of carbohydrates to balance out a protein rich diet (A TON of research has been done on this) You will find, if you talk to your local vet, that many of these raw diets are actually deficient in many minerals and vitamins, including Calcium and Phosphorus. I will not say that these diets cannot be healthy, but it does take some effort to balance them for your pet. Not only do these diets tend to not be balanced, but dogs can and will get many of the food borne diseases that we can get from raw meat (Salmonella, E. coli, Camphlobacter, etc.)

On the other hand, a "treat" of raw meat, or spent grain doggie bars are quite acceptable.


Jason B. DVM c/o2010
 

jklotz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2008
Messages
80
Reaction score
1
Location
Atlanta, GA
for what it's worth, make sure there are no hops that make it into the cookies. I understand they are poisonous for dogs.
 

Dr_Deathweed

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2007
Messages
2,376
Reaction score
49
Location
Bryan
for what it's worth, make sure there are no hops that make it into the cookies. I understand they are poisonous for dogs.
Ah, thank you for bringing this up. There have been a few reported cases of sight hound breeds (mostly greyhounds) developing malignant hyperthermia (kinda like an uncontrolled fever, body just keeps making itself hotter and hotter) after the ingestion of hop products. This is not something that I would generaly not worry about, as it takes a while to dig up the details in the archives of veterinary litterature (translate: pretty freakin rare...) BUT, I would also say don't tempt fate and feed your dog the leftover hops from that IIPA your brewin next weekend ;)
 

telemarc

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2008
Messages
178
Reaction score
0
My dog Kaya likes to RDWHAHB with me! Now she can have some grain treats as well.
 

CBBaron

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2007
Messages
2,780
Reaction score
21
Location
Cleveland
Dogs, like humans, are carnivors by nature but that doesnt meant that won't like a good spent grain dog biscuit.
Dogs are carnivores, humans however are omnivores with a much longer and more complicated digestive tract.

This recipe sounds pretty good as a snack for dogs or humans. I would not feed it to either as a significant part of the diet. I may have to make a batch for myself next time i brew. :D

Craig
 

Mutilated1

Beer Drenched Executioner
Joined
Jul 15, 2007
Messages
2,147
Reaction score
26
Location
Hoover, Alabama USA
You can also add bacon grease or beef tallow instead of or in addition to the peanut butter.

Our dog loves them, and our daughter loves to mess around in the kitchen and make them. I get an automatic brew assistant as long as I agree to let her make dog cookies.
 

GroovePuppy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2008
Messages
1,734
Reaction score
5
You can also add bacon grease or beef tallow instead of or in addition to the peanut butter.

Our dog loves them, and our daughter loves to mess around in the kitchen and make them. I get an automatic brew assistant as long as I agree to let her make dog cookies.
Mmmmmmm, bacon grease. :p
 

fratermus

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2008
Messages
1,188
Reaction score
3
Location
75081
Please, please, please, before you start your dog on one of these raw meat diets, talk to your vet first.
I didn't get the feeling that the OP was recommending meat-only. Even the most ardent BARFers (Bones And Raw Food) aren't doing meat-only.

Owners of sighthounds get used to doing their own research because (as you point out) they have strange reactions to things. Very undoglike dogs, IMO.
 

Dr_Deathweed

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2007
Messages
2,376
Reaction score
49
Location
Bryan
I didn't get the feeling that the OP was recommending meat-only. Even the most ardent BARFers (Bones And Raw Food) aren't doing meat-only.
You are correct, but I was pointing out a previous post (hence why I quoted it), where the author stated, "I've recently been feeding raw beef and chicken to my dogs. "
 

Danek

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 12, 2007
Messages
1,275
Reaction score
17
Location
Sheffield, UK
How would these cookies be for human consumption? I don't have a dog, but reading this thread has made me hungry.

Hungry for dog treats. This is a new low. :( :D
 

Beerrific

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2007
Messages
5,537
Reaction score
61
Location
Georgia
Got this recipe from Beerrific a couple of days ago.
I should point out that I found there recipe here: Spent grain dog biscuits - Realbeer.com Beer Community

I make a double batch of these once every couple months. My dogs love them. Our dogs stay in their crates during the day while we are gone. If we simply say "Go get in your crates" (or just simply "crates"), they run for their crates. All they ask for in return is a 1inx1in spent grain treat.

I have tried one. They are very dry and hurt my gums. They are also very bland. You could probably very easily make these into a tastier, high-protein bar with a few minor changes to the recipe.
 

Yooper

Ale's What Cures You!
Staff member
Admin
Mod
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jun 4, 2006
Messages
74,511
Reaction score
12,042
Location
UP/Snowbird in Florida
How would these cookies be for human consumption? I don't have a dog, but reading this thread has made me hungry.

Hungry for dog treats. This is a new low. :( :D
Before they're dry, they taste ok but need sugar!

Um, I mean, I would think that would be how they would taste if I were to be so low as to eat dog biscuits.

My husband called them "peanut butter flavored cardboard" after they were dried.
 

Dr_Deathweed

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2007
Messages
2,376
Reaction score
49
Location
Bryan
Dogs are carnivores, humans however are omnivores with a much longer and more complicated digestive tract.
Not true.

Dogs are NOT strict carnivores, and their dietary requirements, as well as their gastrointestinal anatomy more closely resemble that of an omnivore. Their digestive tract is also VERY similar to that of humans.

From "Small Animal Clinical Nutrition" 4th ed, Chapter 9 pgs 216-217, section titled Dogs as omnivores:

Several researchers have examined the eating habits of wolves (Canis lupus), the nearest ancestors of our domestic dogs, and close relatives such as coyotes (Canis latrans). Both are opportunistic predators and scavengers, hunting and eating what is available regionally. Coyotes eat carrion and hunt rodents, other small mammals, birds, amphibians and other species. In addition, they have been reported to consume droppings of herbivorous prey; domestic dogs also will readily consume herbivore feces. Regional ungulates such as buffalo, deer, elk, moose, wildebeest, antelope and zebra are the natural prey of wolves. Viscera are considered the choicest part; therefore partly digested vegetable material is a normal part of a wolves's diet. Both coyotes and wolves also eat plant matter such as fruits, berries, persimmons, mushrooms and melons. Similarly, dogs are opportunistic eaters and have developed anatomic and physiologic characteristics that permit digestion ans usage of a varied diet.


On a side note, cats are strict carnivores, and require very high protein levels in relation to carbohydrates.

-Jason B. DVM c/o 2010
 

CBBaron

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2007
Messages
2,780
Reaction score
21
Location
Cleveland
Not true.

Dogs are NOT strict carnivores, and their dietary requirements, as well as their gastrointestinal anatomy more closely resemble that of an omnivore. Their digestive tract is also VERY similar to that of humans.

From "Small Animal Clinical Nutrition" 4th ed, Chapter 9 pgs 216-217, section titled Dogs as omnivores:

On a side note, cats are strict carnivores, and require very high protein levels in relation to carbohydrates.

-Jason B. DVM c/o 2010
The quote you provided only mentioned vegetable food sources as minor sources of nutrition and animal protein and fat as the primary source of nutrition. Sounds like a carnivore that enjoys sweets (fruit) when available.
I'm sure you enjoy candy at times, but you don't expect to eat candy for a meal. I think with dogs, vegetable sources of food should be treated the same way and not the primary source of nutrition as it is in most "dog food".

However you are correct that dogs are much more capable of digesting vegetable treats than cats or ferrets.

Craig
 

GilaMinumBeer

Half-fast Prattlarian
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jan 23, 2008
Messages
65,437
Reaction score
10,789
My dog LOVES them. I make them large and instead of scoring and breaking them, I just do them like drop cookies. I plop a big spoonful down, and press into a rectangle shape. They are his favorite treat and he goes crazy for them.

Of course, he also loves deer poop, so I don't think he's very discriminating.
The poop iz fo teh buzz and dah Kookeez is fo dah muncheez.
 
OP
schweaty

schweaty

Doe Re Mi Beer
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Sep 18, 2008
Messages
1,802
Reaction score
53
Location
Glass City
I must admit I tried one as well. They wouldn't be so bad if they were soft and had more sugar. In comparison to other dog treats I have tasted, I'd have to say these are my favorite :)
 

thevalkrye

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2007
Messages
91
Reaction score
0
"The poop iz fo teh buzz and dah Kookeez is fo dah muncheez"..........ha ha ha ha good one!!
 

TerapinChef

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2007
Messages
995
Reaction score
9
Location
St. Clair Shores, MI
My two pit's love these things...I tried to make a batch for myself adding a little bit of sugar but they weren't much better than the dog's batch...next time I'll cut back on the flour, add a bit of honey and brown sugar, and not give them the long bake treatment.

FYI, after I cut them, I just turn the oven down to warm and leave them in overnight...
 

Schlenkerla

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Apr 18, 2006
Messages
16,778
Reaction score
5,862
My two pit's love these things...I tried to make a batch for myself adding a little bit of sugar but they weren't much better than the dog's batch...next time I'll cut back on the flour, add a bit of honey and brown sugar, and not give them the long bake treatment.

FYI, after I cut them, I just turn the oven down to warm and leave them in overnight...

This is totally cool!!! :rockin:


My dog Buzz will be a Beer Cookie Snob & an EAC



Irish Red - Dog Cookies
BierMunchers Cream of 3 Crop - Dog Cookies
Orfy's Hobgoblin - Dog Cookies
Edwort's Haus Ale - Dog Cookies.







 

Dr_Deathweed

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2007
Messages
2,376
Reaction score
49
Location
Bryan
:off:

Sorry, I apologize to the OP, this will be the last time I sidetrack this thread unless someone later has a specific nutritional or veterinary question.

The quote you provided only mentioned vegetable food sources as minor sources of nutrition and animal protein and fat as the primary source of nutrition. Sounds like a carnivore that enjoys sweets (fruit) when available.
That is the problem with quoting out of a giant veterinary tome, or trying to paraphrase a field where extensive research has been been preformed; you can't quite get all the info into one post without your fingers falling off and/or exceeding the 10,000 character limit. ;)

The definition of omnivore is "having a diet that consists of both plant and animal matter", (paraphrased out of Dorlands Medical Dictionary 30th ed.) but can be expanded to, "a creature that is both able and willing to ingest, digest, and metabolize both plant and animal materials as part of their normal diet." To keep from having to quote from the multitude of reliable, peer-reviewed sources out there, I will stick to quoting from "Small Animal Clinical Nutrition," but will post further sources if you so wish. If you do not wish to stick to the admittedly dry and boring scientific literature, I am sure a goggle search will come up with similar information, but will also abound with misconstrued ideals on pet nutrition which are backed up only on "feeling" and not on "fact."

You mention plant matter as "treats," and "minor sources of nutrition." Further reading in "Small Animal Clinical Nutrition" mentions that not only do wild canids readily ingest plant material in various forms when prey is plentiful, but when animal prey is scarce they can subsist solely on plant material until their next kill. Research into the nutritional requirements of dogs that compared diets between those fed a balanced animal diet and those fed a balanced vegetable diet showed no difference between the groups. These studies and observations show that dogs are willing to ingest, digest, and are physiologically able to metabolize plant and animal material, giving them the title of omnivore.

I'm sure you enjoy candy at times, but you don't expect to eat candy for a meal. I think with dogs, vegetable sources of food should be treated the same way and not the primary source of nutrition as it is in most "dog food".
Yes, I do enjoy candy, and no it is not my primary source of nutrition (usually) :D However I also do not eat meat for every meal, and the majority of my dietary intake is from plant material (pastas, bread, beans, rice, etc.), does this make me a herbivore? Of course not! Just because a vegetarian eats no meat products, does that make them a herbivore? No! Because as a human, we are able to ingest, digest, and metabolize both plant and animal materials.

Yes sir, you are also correct that many dog food diets contain a good amount of plant material (corn, rice, potato, etc.), and this is for a multitude of reasons:
-Caloric density: Starches from plant material is much more caloricly dense than meat products. this way you do not have to feed your dog 20lbs of dog food a day.
-Ability to utilize plant material: Addressed above.
-ability to store: I do not know about you, but last time I tried to keep a bag of buffalo guts around.....
-Expense: Yes, economics do take a part, as they take a part in everything else in our lives.

If you are still convinced that your pet should subsist on a majority animal product diet, there are some very good resources out there, but I urge you to PLEASE talk to your vet about formulating a well balanced diet to optimize your pets health, or find a good, credible, certified veterinary nutritionist to help develop a diet. For the majority of us that do not have the time or money to cook and prepare for ourselves, let alone our pets, any brand name (not store brand) dog food out there has been tested to be balanced for your pets nutrition.

If you have further specific questions about your pet, please consult your vet.
 

LibertyBrewer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2008
Messages
207
Reaction score
20
We live out in the country, and I can tell you dogs like eating grain. Most dogs don't have a problem eating sweet feed. My dogs will eat the spent grain without having to add anything to it. I usually put it out for the horses. If they are not around, the dogs get some before they show up.
 

BlackenedBrew

Beer GOOOOD! Napster BAD!
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Dec 12, 2007
Messages
173
Reaction score
4
Location
Salem
My dog Buzz will be a Beer Cookie Snob & an EAC
Ok, I've done a few searches of forums, checked out the Brew Wiki, Wikipedia, Urban Dictionary, and just a Google search... can't find it...

I know I'm going to get totally pwned for being a n00b, but I guess that's the price of admission... Can someone please tell me what an EAC is?
 
Top