Recipe Challenge - Baked Goods

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bill402

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My wife runs a small home bakery, and is getting ready to take her business to the next level. I'm wanting to brew something that could somehow replicate bakery flavor or smell. Her most requested cake is by far a white almond sour cream cake. Any idea on what kind of beer style or ingredients could be added to create a bakery flavored beer? I know the easy route could be to replicate bread flavor, but she's strictly pastry.
 

dmtaylor

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Real quick thoughts:

An Oktoberfest style lager comes to mind, with its rich toasty malt character. If you wanted, you could add a touch of almond extract to take it to the next level. Be sure to go easy on it -- a little goes a long way. About 1.5 teaspoons is probably a good ballpark amount for how much to use in a standard 5-gallon batch.

You can also enhance bready flavors using Wyeast 1007 altbier yeast. It is the breadiest yeast I have ever experienced in my life -- I swear it must be very closely related to actual Fleischmann's bread yeast or similar, as it's THAT bready. However it loses some of this with age, and does finish clean and dry after a month or two. Ferment around 55-60 F. Coincidentally, this yeast would work really well with my previous idea of an Oktoberfest (or you could call it a Mocktoberfest since this is an ale yeast).

For more frosting-like flavors you could also add vanilla beans to the fermenter, instead of or in addition to other ingredients. I've never done this but many other folks have. Do a little research for amounts.

Same with cinnamon sticks.

I have successfully used other spices by soaking the ground spices in a couple ounces of vodka overnight, then adding just the clear flavored vodka to the fully fermented beer at bottling/kegging time, leaving the actual spice solids behind. Then it doesn't goop up the keg or bottles.

For more crackery flavors, a Munich helles would be a great base style. Or a Kolsch. Again, the 1007 yeast seems just about perfect for these.

Hope you find what you are looking for.
 

ConorO

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I have made spice extracts from steeping allspice, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, etc. in a mason jar with vodka. Initially, I tied all of the spices up in a coffee filter to eliminate most of the debris. I let this soak for several weeks, but I would sample it every now and again to make sure that it's not getting too tannic. Afterward, you can add your flavor extract to taste. One can also do this with nuts - I made a nut brown ale with pecan extract using a similar method.

As for the sour cream taste, I've been pondering a Carrot Cake Ale, and was thinking about using a hint of lactic acid to give some semblance of a tangy cream cheese frosting. I would certainly mash high if this is going to be a dessert beer - one could even resort to lactose, but then you might over-sweeten it.

I wish you the best of luck! :mug:
 
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bill402

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Ok, I've been down with the stomach virus, so I've had some time to give this some thought. A series of "bread" beers might be cool. Banana bread (I know these are out there already), carrot cake, or even pumpkin.
 
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