Ramping Fermentation Temps

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dgoldb1

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I brewed an extract IPA with Wyeast 1056 on Saturday. Chilled down to 66*F and pitched. I began fermentation in my fridge at 66*F and today I ramped up to about 67.5*F. What type of temperature schedule should I try to stick to? Would a degree every 2-3 days be ideal until I hit 71/72*F?
 

Pilgarlic

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I don't think everyone shares the assumption that you should ramp it up at all. I hold most of my ale brews at 68 through 3-4 weeks in the fermentor. Some say ramp it up a bit to clean up any diacetyl you may have, but with an adequate pitch rate and good aeration/oxygenation, you should expect a clean ferment.
 

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I brewed an extract IPA with Wyeast 1056 on Saturday. Chilled down to 66*F and pitched. I began fermentation in my fridge at 66*F and today I ramped up to about 67.5*F. What type of temperature schedule should I try to stick to? Would a degree every 2-3 days be ideal until I hit 71/72*F?
Why do you want to go up to 72? Why not stay at 68 the entire time? I like to ferment at the low end of most yeast strains, but sometimes 1056 gets a little citrusy at the lower end. I wouldn't go above 68, though, since above 70 it can start to get a little fruity. Here's the scoop on 1056 from Wyeast:

Very clean, crisp flavor characteristics with low fruitiness and mild ester production. A very versatile yeast for styles that desire dominant malt and hop character. This strain makes a wonderful “House” strain. Mild citrus notes develop with cooler 60-66°F (15-19ºC) fermentations. Normally requires filtration for bright beers.

Origin:
Flocculation: Medium-Low
Attenuation: 73-77%
Temperature Range: 60-72F, 15-22C
 
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dgoldb1

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I was under the impression that ramping up would help the yeast fully attenuate and would also clean up any byproducts. I guess this is one of those controversial topics :)
 

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I was under the impression that ramping up would help the yeast fully attenuate and would also clean up any byproducts. I guess this is one of those controversial topics :)
Well, that's probably true. But I can't see the avantage to doing it until the beer is at least 75% of the way to FG. And I've never had a beer underattenuate when I haven't done it, so I don't think it's controversial just probably not necessary in yeast strains that aren't notorious diacetyl producers or underattenuators.

If I was using Ringwood ale yeast, then I would ferment at the low end of that yeast strain's optimum temperature, then ramp when fermentation was finishing up, but still staying a few degrees under the maximum optimum fermentation temperature.

But for 1056, I don't see any reason to do that.
 
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dgoldb1

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Well, that's probably true. But I can't see the avantage to doing it until the beer is at least 75% of the way to FG. And I've never had a beer underattenuate when I haven't done it, so I don't think it's controversial just probably not necessary in yeast strains that aren't notorious diacetyl producers or underattenuators.

If I was using Ringwood ale yeast, then I would ferment at the low end of that yeast strain's optimum temperature, then ramp when fermentation was finishing up, but still staying a few degrees under the maximum optimum fermentation temperature.

But for 1056, I don't see any reason to do that.
Ahh, gotcha. 1056 normally doesn't need to be ramped. Thanks.
 

PT Ray

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I'm a ramper. I try try to squeeze as much attenuation out as possible by raising the temp as fermentation slows. Not so much for all grain but more for extract brews as they tend finish on the high side. If it's an English type ale I'll start at something like 66 degrees and finish around 72-74.

When the yeast starts dropping I'll go ahead drop the temp to about 50 and hold for a couple weeks. For a cleaner ale I'll start around 60 and max out around 68.
 
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