Only One Shoot?

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SOB

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So my first year Hallertau and Willemette rhizomes have been in 25gal pots for about a month now. They both broke ground about 10 days after planting. 2 of those 10 days (before they sprouted) they were in the garage due to cold conditions but that's beside the point. The question is, I expected to see more than one shoot on each of the two rhizomes. Is only one shoot at this stage normal for first year? They got plenty of water due to mother nature early in their life so I was initially afraid of rotting. Once the shoot came up I figured the rhizome was still good.

:mug:
 

fratermus

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So my first year Hallertau and Willemette rhizomes have been in 25gal pots for about a month now.
My first-year Hallertau only has one shoot. Last year the Cascade had 3-4 and the Golding had, uhh, two if I remember correctly.
 

JPicasso

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My first years only had one shoot for the longest time, then about end of july, they grew out some more. I probably had 10-15 by fall, and they were thin and only produced a handful of buds that might have eventually grown up to be cones.

This year's crop is much heartier, and I"ve clipped back quite a few bines to allow the plant to focus on the stronger bines.

For first year hops, I think the consensus is to just let them grow as they will, plenty of sun and water, and next year work on grooming them for cone growth. Which was enough pressure for me. Keeping plants alive is not my strong suit.

Good luck!
 

david_42

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Putting up one shoot initially conserves resources. Don't be surprised if you get more later.
 

tac0meat

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All of mine started off with only one shoot when they broke ground a month ago. Now they are starting to grow more shoots.
 

GearBeer

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My Willamette is ~18" long and has been growing for about a month. It just finally sprouted a second bine on Monday.
 

nipsy3

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You're lucky. My first year Hallertau has no shoots.

Actually, it had two, but I pissed around too long before transferring it from the pot to the ground. It got too tall I didn't support it properly. It snapped under it's own weight when it came loose from it's prop. The second shoot was much shorter, but it strangely disappeared. Rabbit I suspect. Oh well. I'll just have to wait until next year.

Anyways, one shoot is fine. If you had multiple, you'd need to the additional ones off anyways. Just keep an eye out. Did you notice more than one bud on the rhizome before planting?
 
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SOB

SOB

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Anyways, one shoot is fine. If you had multiple, you'd need to the additional ones off anyways. Just keep an eye out. Did you notice more than one bud on the rhizome before planting?
Why would you need them off? I was going to train whatever shoots grew up the rope to maximize root growth.

The Hallertau had a few buds before planting. Actually, it had 2 shoots already growing and I'm sure one of those is what has broken ground so far. The Willimette had not buds at all but still broke ground the same time as the Hallertau.

I wasn't too worried about only having one shoot. I basically just wanted some confirmation that it was common for first year.

Thanks! :mug:
 

nipsy3

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I believe the idea is you want all the energy supporting one shoot rather than divided amongst multiple shoots. If you're lucky, you can get a harvest from the one. I think it may be less likely if you have a few shorter shoots, if at all.

My first year centennial last year had one shoot get about 8 feet tall with enough cones to bitter an IPA.
 

sterling214

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There are 2 ways of looking at it for first year plants.
One way, is to just let it grow as it will so that it has a healthy root system for the 2n't year growth.
Other people will try to get cones out of their first year plant and will only let one bine grow.
I would tend to go with the first way. You are not likely to get many cones either way.
 
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SOB

SOB

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There are 2 ways of looking at it for first year plants.
One way, is to just let it grow as it will so that it has a healthy root system for the 2n't year growth.
Other people will try to get cones out of their first year plant and will only let one bine grow.
I would tend to go with the first way. You are not likely to get many cones either way.
I agree...I could care less about cones this year. I'm going at it that I want to do what's best for the future of the plant and anything it produces is an extra bonus.
 
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