New England IPA "Northeast" style IPA

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beervoid

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Not sure I follow what you are saying. I get that these hops are more efficient at producing the true hop flavor with less vegetal matter/flavors, but Im wondering HOW peeps have been using them. Are people generally using the same dosages(ounces) as the regular t90 pellet recipes in order to get even more intense hop flavors OR are people generally using less dosages (because they are more "efficient" at delivering what we want - flavor) which would theoretically result in similar flavor profiles as the t90 pellets? Thanks!

EDIT: I would also like to see the total oil content of these products and not just the AAs as mentioned on YVH website. Unless, the total oil content is the same as t90 pellets? It would seem to me more than just the AAs would differ compared to t90 pellets? Just trying to best understand the product is all.
A similar question as how much hops do you think is the max worth to throw at an ipa and do you taste a flavor difference.
I would argue that if you use lupomax and use it to cut down on vegetal matter you will taste more of a difference then maximizing total amounts with it. Might be even better mixing it all up as Other Half does for example with their HDHC technique.
This all aside, I put 6oz lupomax only and get a very saturated pungent hop flavor out of it and suspect u can go lower then this and still be a very happy hophead.
 

Dgallo

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While searching for more info I came across this. Really interesting, EQ owner and brewer states their typical dryhop is 3lb/bbl which is just under 2 oz/gallon. Some other really good info on LUPOMAX and Equilibrium here (also some not relevant info for us). They also hint that there are even more Haas products that they are beta testing that they aren’t allowed to talk about yet
 
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R.A.I.D

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I have brewed this nice Trillium Streets inspired NEIPA with Nectaron.

"It tastes like tropical fruit juice! Mango, grape, pineapple, passion fruit. Easy drinking. This sh** is dangerous!"
Trillium Nectaron.jpg

RAW (No boil)
In WP kettle: 21 L (5.5 us gallons)
Into fermenter: 18.5-19 L (5 us gallons)
Into dry hop keg: 16.0-16.5 L
Into serving keg: 14.0 L

Water profile:
Ca 115 | Mg 15 | Na 100 | SO4 50 | Cl 200

OG: 1070
FG: 1013
ABV: 7.5
Mash: 62C 60min
Mash out: 76C 15min (169F) for pasteurization.

Pale Ale malt: 4500g
Wheat malt: 1000g
Honig malt: 300g
Chit malt: 200g
Table sugar: 250g

Mash hops: 18g Columbus (2018)
WP hops at 76C (mash out temp): 90g Columbus (2020)
WP hops at 42C: 35g Columbus (2019)
DH: 150g Nectaron (2020), 25g Columbus (2020)

Ascorbic acid, 1g, with DH
Citric acid, 0.5g, with DH

Yeast nutrient, boiled 10 min and added to WP kettle.

Yeast:
Mangrove Jacks M66 Hophead Ale Yeast (yeast and enzyme blend), 1 pkg, rehydrated with GoFerm.

Pitch 23C (73F)
Fermentation 19C (66F) for 7 days
Fermentation 23C (73F) for 3 days, PRV 1 bar.
Cold crash at -1C for 3 days.
Heat to 16C. Closed transfer to (fermentation purged) dry hop keg. Started a new cold crash right away. Shaked for 10 min after 4 hours (was chilled to 9C at that point in time) and force carbonated at the same time. Continued cold crash.
Cold crash at -1C for 4 days (still on dry hop).
Closed transfer to purged serving keg.

I tasted it before dry hopping: Not much aroma. Nice yellow. Not a hint of orange. Stable head. Solid haze. Taste: A little anonymous but dank base. Not much complexity. Burns a little (but is of course not ready yet). Suitable bitterness level. The M66 yeast comes with enzymes. But I can not point out anything in this beer that could be related to that enzyme activity.

Tasted again the day for the transfer to the serving keg: Zero hop burn. Ready to drink. Beautiful yellow. Mild aroma. Mild taste. Light body (relative to the style). Nice spring beer. Suitable and balanced bitterness in the aftertaste for my personal preference. The main contribution to the bitterness in this beer is not alpha acids but other different hop compounds. The bitterness is different from the bitterness from boiled hops. Different from what you normally find in a beer, but still balance out the sweetness.
It smells and tastes like tropical fruit juice! Mango, grape, pineapple, passion fruit. Easy drinking. This sh** is dangerous.

I think I will go back to S-33, which is my favorite NEIPA yeast until now (out of LA3, S-04, Lallemand NE, Horningdal kveik) given its incredible ability to boost aroma. S-33 will also result in a higher FG, which might give the beer a bit more body. I will also let the beer stay on DH at 16C for 4 hours before I start shaking and cold crashing hoping for more intense taste. I might also back down on the WP amount given the latest discussions in this thread, and the kind of disappointing tasting notes from the tasting before dry hopping.
 
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beervoid

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I have brewed this nice Trillium Streets inspired NEIPA with Nectaron.

"It tastes like tropical fruit juice! Mango, grape, pineapple, passion fruit. Easy drinking. This sh** is dangerous!"

RAW (No boil)
In WP kettle: 21 L (5.5 us gallons)
Into fermenter: 18.5-19 L (5 us gallons)
Into dry hop keg: 16.0-16.5 L
Into serving keg: 14.0 L

Water profile:
Ca 115 | Mg 15 | Na 100 | SO4 50 | Cl 200

OG: 1070
FG: 1013
ABV: 7.5
Mash: 62C 60min
Mash out: 76C 15min (169F) for pasteurization.

Pale Ale malt: 4500g
Wheat malt: 1000g
Honig malt: 300g
Chit malt: 200g
Table sugar: 250g

Mash hops: 18g Columbus (2018)
WP hops at 76C (mash out temp): 90g Columbus (2020)
WP hops at 42C: 35g Columbus (2019)
DH: 150g Nectaron (2020), 25g Columbus (2020)

Ascorbic acid, 1g, with DH
Citric acid, 0.5g, with DH

Yeast nutrient, boiled 10 min and added to WP kettle.

Yeast:
Mangrove Jacks M66 Hophead Ale Yeast (yeast and enzyme blend), 1 pkg, rehydrated with GoFerm.

Pitch 23C (73F)
Fermentation 19C (66F) for 7 days
Fermentation 23C (73F) for 3 days, PRV 1 bar.
Cold crash at -1C for 3 days.
Heat to 16C. Closed transfer to (fermentation purged) dry hop keg. Started a new cold crash right away. Shaked to 10 min after 4 hours (was chilled to 9C at that point in time) and force carbonated at the same time. Continued cold crash.
Cold crash at -1C for 4 days (still on dry hop).
Closed transfer to purged serving keg.

I tasted it before dry hopping: Not much aroma. Nice yellow. Not a hint of orange. Stable head. Solid haze. Taste: A little anonymous but dank base. Not much complexity. Burns a little (but is of course not ready yet). Suitable bitterness level. The M66 yeast comes with enzymes. But I can not point out anything in this beer that could be related to that enzyme activity.

Tasted again the day for the transfer to the serving keg: Zero hop burn. Ready to drink. Beautiful yellow. Mild aroma. Mild taste. Light body (relative to the style). Nice spring beer. Suitable and balanced bitterness in the aftertaste for my personal preference. The main contribution to the bitterness in this beer is not alpha acids but other different hop compounds. The bitterness is different from the bitterness from boiled hops. Different from what you normally find in a beer, but still balance out the sweetness.
It smells and tastes like tropical fruit juice! Mango, grape, pineapple, passion fruit. Easy drinking. This sh** is dangerous.

I think I will go back to S-33, which is my favorite NEIPA yeast until now (out of LA3, S-04, Lallemand NE, Horningdal kveik) given its incredible ability to boost aroma. S-33 will also result in a higher FG, which might give the beer a bit more body. I will also let the beer stay on DH at 16C for 4 hours before I start shaking and cold crashing hoping for more intense taste. I might also back down on the WP amount given the latest discussions in this thread, and the kind of disappointing tasting notes from the tasting before dry hopping.
That yeast is new for me, thanks for sharing.
What i'm always wondering with these enzymes is at what temps do they work?
And how much oils are left from a WP addition for them to work on, and if during vigorous fermentation how much of what is won is blown out again.
 

aaronm13

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"only" 13.5% AA? Isn't cashmere AAs lower than that for the t90 pellets? Never used LUPOMAX hops yet myself, but it seems that since they are concentrated, as far as the AAs are concerned, you would need less to get IBUs you want on the hot side for sure. But for DH I think I wouldn't mind using my same hop dosages with LUPOMAX to get more intense flavors with the same dosage rather than using less ounces for the same intensity as nonlupomax pellets. How have others been doing this with DHing? Keeping your same recipe dosages if using LUPOMAX or reducing the dosages? Im hoping that they release Idaho 7 on this this year.
Brewing a Citra and Nelson DIPA tomorrow and using 2020 Citra Lupomax. Going with the recommended 30% less dosage compared to T90 pellets. Will be 4oz Nelson and 5oz Citra Lupomax in the dry hop.
 

DawgPen Brewing

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I have a question that I haven't seen answered yet or at least I couldn't find it scrolling through things. If it has been answered if someone could point me in the right direction it would be very appreciated.

My question is what are the effects of adding the dry hops at different times since I see differing information with some recipes suggesting a dry hop before the peak of krausen formation (basically a couple days into fermentation) and other options that state 6 days and 3 days before kegging. I have found a lot of contradicting information regarding how vegetal flavors can be introduced by longer dry hops but it does seem to have some benefit to dry hop during active fermentation because any oxygen introduced during the dry hopping process would likely be scrubbed away from the yeast. What does the group say about the benefits of earlier or later dry hopping and what impact will it have on the flavors of the beer (increased aromas, more fruity, etc.)?

These articles seem to suggest a shorter dry hop may be more appropriate:


.

What is the group consensus? I was leaning to moving my dry hops more toward the active fermentation timeframe but this suggests that a couple days is all that would be needed. Can anyone provide some clarity for me?
 

Dplonk87

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I’m a big fan of that combo. I personally wouldn’t bother with one 1 oz of Idaho 7 in the DH, probably would use at least 2 if I’m looking for the profile to come out in the aroma. Otherwise I would move that oz on the hotside and do a Citra/strata dh.
I would like to use that hop combination but have not purchased hops yet. If there is no constraint from already having specific quantities of hops is that still what you would recommend?
 

Dgallo

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I would like to use that hop combination but have not purchased hops yet. If there is no constraint from already having specific quantities of hops is that still what you would recommend?
There’s a lot of great hop combos. That is certainly one of them. What’s cool about Citra/strata/idaho 7 is you can mix up the ratio of each and even though they taste different, they are all good. It’s hard to say which I liked more but Strara/I7 hotside 1:1 and dryhop strata/I7/Citra 2:1:2 is a really good one. Might look something like this;

Hotside
Bitter from about .5-.65BU/GU with magnum or Columbus.
Late/whirlpool
2oz strata
2oz Idaho 7

Dryhop;
3 oz strata
1.5 oz Idaho 7
3 oz Citra
 

TheToE

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Finally nailed this one thanks to you kind folks! Skipped the DH during active fermentation, waited till I hit terminal gravity. Lovely beer. Thanks all!

PS: The Yakima valley hops lupomax stuff is great! Went with citra and mosiac in equal portion.
 

tomsen

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I made this recipe and I really like it. It has some notes of peach and I would like to amplify it, but I'm not sure how. I think it's the Sabro hops, but maybe some of you guys could chime in to improve this recipe:


malts:
62% pilsner
14% pale whaet
14% flaked oats
7% golden promise
3% honey malt

hops @5min left
30g sabro
30g citra
25g mosaic
hops for 15 min whirlpool around at 75°C:
50g citra
40g sabro
25g mosaic

dry hop after terminal gravity and after cold crash:
35g citra
30g sabro
15g mosaic
 

AZBeer

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Just wanted to say thanks to all in this thread. I've been brewing since 2016ish, but have been bottling. I've been drinking more and more hazy IPAs b/c that is what you can get at the local breweries, bottle shops, grocery stores...gas stations...everywhere. I have stayed away from brewing them because I was bottling, but I realized that I wasnt brewing as much because the WCIPA I was brewing just weren't hitting the mark for me.

I realized it when I got a 4 pack of a local brewery's WCIPA...which use to be a favorite of mine, and I realized my preference has changed for NEIPA/HazyIPAs.

Set myself up to keg. Closed transfer and all. First NEIPA ever, first kegged homebrew ever...and probably my best beer to date. Nothing went perfect, hell, nothing went particularly well with the transfer. I drastically underestimated the amount of crap to clog valves and hoses. Even had to pull the liquid out post to clear a clog. Despite all of that, all seems okay 2 weeks from carbing the keg. Not sure how long this one will last, but also know I can do better.

Already have the next version ready to go.
 
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BeerFst

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I made this recipe and I really like it. It has some notes of peach and I would like to amplify it, but I'm not sure how. I think it's the Sabro hops, but maybe some of you guys could chime in to improve this recipe:


malts:
62% pilsner
14% pale whaet
14% flaked oats
7% golden promise
3% honey malt

hops @5min left
30g sabro
30g citra
25g mosaic
hops for 15 min whirlpool around at 75°C:
50g citra
40g sabro
25g mosaic

dry hop after terminal gravity and after cold crash:
35g citra
30g sabro
15g mosaic
What yeast?
 

Dgallo

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My thought as well. US05 tends to throw strong peach flavors for me.
Us05 should be extremely clean. It’s from the Chico family. What temp are you getting esters at?
 

Noob_Brewer

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I brew an IPA with US-05. I pitch at 61° and get lots of peach. I love it.
Interesting. Given that Ive only used US-05 for the clean ferments, if it can give peaches, I'd be all about the stone fruit esters!
 

HopsAreGood

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I’ve only used us-05 a few times but I’ve always read that it throws a lot of peach if fermented around 60.
 

aaronm13

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Has anyone used ABV Aromazyme yet? Got a small pack of it to try so temped to use it when I dry hop during the week. Don't want to be changing too many variables in my process at the same time.
 

tomsen

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To support the upper post
Totally forgot to mention, I used Lalbrew Verdant IPA
So I have been thinking maybe use Lalbrews new england? I only have access to dry yeast
 

HopsAreGood

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BFEA764E-5879-4DF4-9190-293B399B7DC6.jpeg
I I haven’t shared too much lately but I’m pretty proud of this one. I’d definitely say it’s one of the best beers I’ve ever made, or at least one of my favorites.

Mash PH 5.25
Ca: 81
Mg: 13
Na: 57
Cl: 175
So4: 75
Mash temp: 152

70% 2-row
13.3% malted oats
13.3% white wheat
3.3% c-10

10 min: 1 oz Idaho 7, .75 oz mosaic Lupomax

5 min: 1 oz Idaho 7, .75 oz mosaic Lupomax

Flame out: 1 oz Idaho 7, .75 oz mosaic Lupomax (let sit for 5 minutes before starting the chiller)

No whirlpool at all.

8 grams Verdant IPA yeast
8 grams S-04

1.070 - 1.012 7.6% ABV

Pitched and held at 65 for the first 72 hours. All signs of active fermentation were done at this point. Raised to 67 for one day, then 69 for another, and then 71 for one more day. I then soft crashed to 60 for 48 hours.

I then transferred into the fermentation purged dry hop keg with 6 oz of Nectaron and 4 oz of Nelson. Stuck the dry hop keg immediately into my chest freezer which is held at 46 degrees. About 12 hours later I took the dry hop keg out and gently rolled it back and forth and turned it upside down a few times. I did this for about 5 minutes and then put it right back into the chest freezer for another 36 hours.

I then jumped the beer from the dry hop keg into a liquid purged serving keg, and carbonated it to 2.4 volumes. After 4 days in the serving keg it is absolutely glorious, and I’m sure it’s only going to get better as it continues to condition and mature.

The biggest thing I’m noticing is the insane level of “hop saturation.” Idaho 7 and Mosaic are apparently the two kings of survivable hop compounds that make it through fermentation and into the final beer, and I think this definitely showcases that. And then the combination of Nectaron and Nelson is just incredible. I’m getting tons of that beautiful, unique Nectaron character and in the background is that oh so familiar Nelsony thing going on.

As I said, very proud of this one.
 
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BeerFst

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View attachment 721522I I haven’t shared too much lately but I’m pretty proud of this one. I’d definitely say it’s one of the best beers I’ve ever made, or at least one of my favorites.

Mash PH 5.25
Ca: 81
Mg: 13
Na: 57
Cl: 175
So4: 75

70% 2-row
13.3% malted oats
13.3% white wheat
3.3% c-10

10 min: 1 oz Idaho 7, .75 oz mosaic Lupomax

5 min: 1 oz Idaho 7, .75 oz mosaic Lupomax

Flame out: 1 oz Idaho 7, .75 oz mosaic Lupomax (let sit for 5 minutes before starting the chiller)

No whirlpool at all.

8 grams Verdant IPA yeast
8 grams S-04

1.070 - 1.012 7.6% ABV

Pitched and held at 65 for the first 72 hours. All signs of active fermentation were done at this point. Raised to 67 for one day, then 69 for another, and then 71 for one more day. I then soft crashed to 60 for 48 hours.

I then transferred into the fermentation purged dry hop keg with 6 oz of Nectaron and 4 oz of Nelson. Stuck the dry hop keg immediately into my chest freezer which is held at 46 degrees. About 12 hours later I took the dry hop keg out and gently rolled it back and forth and turned it upside down a few times. I did this for about 5 minutes and then put it right back into the chest freezer for another 36 hours.

I then jumped the beer from the dry hop keg into a liquid purged serving keg, and carbonated it to 2.4 volumes. After 4 days in the serving keg it is absolutely glorious, and I’m sure it’s only going to get better as it continues to condition and mature.

The biggest thing I’m noticing is the insane level of “hop saturation.” Idaho 7 and Mosaic are apparently the two kings of survivable hop compounds that make it through fermentation and into the final beer, and I think this definitely showcases that. And then the combination of Nectaron and Nelson is just incredible. I’m getting tons of that beautiful, unique Nectaron character and in the background is that oh so familiar Nelsony thing going on.

As I said, very proud of this one.
beautiful color on that one!!
 

R.A.I.D

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View attachment 721522I I haven’t shared too much lately but I’m pretty proud of this one. I’d definitely say it’s one of the best beers I’ve ever made, or at least one of my favorites.

Mash PH 5.25
Ca: 81
Mg: 13
Na: 57
Cl: 175
So4: 75

70% 2-row
13.3% malted oats
13.3% white wheat
3.3% c-10

10 min: 1 oz Idaho 7, .75 oz mosaic Lupomax

5 min: 1 oz Idaho 7, .75 oz mosaic Lupomax

Flame out: 1 oz Idaho 7, .75 oz mosaic Lupomax (let sit for 5 minutes before starting the chiller)

No whirlpool at all.

8 grams Verdant IPA yeast
8 grams S-04

1.070 - 1.012 7.6% ABV

Pitched and held at 65 for the first 72 hours. All signs of active fermentation were done at this point. Raised to 67 for one day, then 69 for another, and then 71 for one more day. I then soft crashed to 60 for 48 hours.

I then transferred into the fermentation purged dry hop keg with 6 oz of Nectaron and 4 oz of Nelson. Stuck the dry hop keg immediately into my chest freezer which is held at 46 degrees. About 12 hours later I took the dry hop keg out and gently rolled it back and forth and turned it upside down a few times. I did this for about 5 minutes and then put it right back into the chest freezer for another 36 hours.

I then jumped the beer from the dry hop keg into a liquid purged serving keg, and carbonated it to 2.4 volumes. After 4 days in the serving keg it is absolutely glorious, and I’m sure it’s only going to get better as it continues to condition and mature.

The biggest thing I’m noticing is the insane level of “hop saturation.” Idaho 7 and Mosaic are apparently the two kings of survivable hop compounds that make it through fermentation and into the final beer, and I think this definitely showcases that. And then the combination of Nectaron and Nelson is just incredible. I’m getting tons of that beautiful, unique Nectaron character and in the background is that oh so familiar Nelsony thing going on.

As I said, very proud of this one.
Sounds great.

Batch size?
First time mixing the two yeast strains?
 

HopsAreGood

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Sounds great.

Batch size?
First time mixing the two yeast strains?
5 gallon batch. I try to get a full 5 gallons into the dry hop keg knowing that I’m going to lose quite a bit from the hop absorption. I haven’t weighed a serving keg after transfer, but I think I get somewhere between 4 - 4.5 gallons of finished beer when all is said and done.

Yes, this is the first time I’ve mixed these two strains. I’ve used them both individually and wanted to see if I could pull some of the desirable characteristics from each. I love how fast and aggressive S04 is, and how it drops like an absolute brick when it’s done. The verdant/1318 leaves such a nice soft mouth feel and pleasant fruity esters, but in my experience can crap out a little bit and take a while to finish. I’ve also had it under attenuate a little bit here and there.

I feel like I was successfully able to get what I wanted from each strain in that it fermented like crazy and was done in 72 hours, which is what I’ve gotten from S-04 before, but it also has that super soft and round mouth feel that you typically get from Verdant or 1318. I don’t detect any of that twang or acidity that some people get from S-04.

It was interesting to watch too because I could see that bright white S-04 krausen for the first two days or so, and then the crusty brown bubbly top cropping verdant krausen take over around the third day. It seemed like the S-04 initially outcompeted the verdant, but in the end I do feel like I got the desirable characteristics that I wanted from each.

Perhaps in the future I might try a little more Verdant and a little less S-04 to see what might happen. Maybe something like:

11 grams Verdant
5-6 grams S-04

But the 50-50 ratio of the two performed beautifully.
 
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My current batch that ill be kegging tonight was fermented with 1318 and under attenuated, not by much but at 70% and i finished at 1.020 which i am not super concerned with for this style. I am thinking i didnt get enough D.O. in there for it. may have to consider your technique for my next batch, i have never mixed strains before.
 

aaronm13

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View attachment 721522I I haven’t shared too much lately but I’m pretty proud of this one. I’d definitely say it’s one of the best beers I’ve ever made, or at least one of my favorites.

Mash PH 5.25
Ca: 81
Mg: 13
Na: 57
Cl: 175
So4: 75

70% 2-row
13.3% malted oats
13.3% white wheat
3.3% c-10

10 min: 1 oz Idaho 7, .75 oz mosaic Lupomax

5 min: 1 oz Idaho 7, .75 oz mosaic Lupomax

Flame out: 1 oz Idaho 7, .75 oz mosaic Lupomax (let sit for 5 minutes before starting the chiller)

No whirlpool at all.

8 grams Verdant IPA yeast
8 grams S-04

1.070 - 1.012 7.6% ABV

Pitched and held at 65 for the first 72 hours. All signs of active fermentation were done at this point. Raised to 67 for one day, then 69 for another, and then 71 for one more day. I then soft crashed to 60 for 48 hours.

I then transferred into the fermentation purged dry hop keg with 6 oz of Nectaron and 4 oz of Nelson. Stuck the dry hop keg immediately into my chest freezer which is held at 46 degrees. About 12 hours later I took the dry hop keg out and gently rolled it back and forth and turned it upside down a few times. I did this for about 5 minutes and then put it right back into the chest freezer for another 36 hours.

I then jumped the beer from the dry hop keg into a liquid purged serving keg, and carbonated it to 2.4 volumes. After 4 days in the serving keg it is absolutely glorious, and I’m sure it’s only going to get better as it continues to condition and mature.

The biggest thing I’m noticing is the insane level of “hop saturation.” Idaho 7 and Mosaic are apparently the two kings of survivable hop compounds that make it through fermentation and into the final beer, and I think this definitely showcases that. And then the combination of Nectaron and Nelson is just incredible. I’m getting tons of that beautiful, unique Nectaron character and in the background is that oh so familiar Nelsony thing going on.

As I said, very proud of this one.
Looks incredible, well done. Have to try and get some Nectaron.

Fermenting at the moment with 1318 and it feels like it's crapping out on me around 4 days from pitching. First time using this strain, usually use London Fog or Conan which finish out no problem at all. Have the fermenter at 72 now to see if it'll help but really worried. Airlock activity has really died down and is at 1.031. kinda thinking of adding some dry hops to see if I can get some hop creep but not sure about adding at that high a temperature.
 
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mine was at 1.028 at day 4 and got down to 1.020 by day 7 and i held around 72f for the last couple days also. i soft crashed at day 10 and it was still at 1.020 then so i figured it was done so moved my process on to dry hop. dry hopped at 50f this time for 3 days. ill get an idea what its like tonight when i keg it.
 

aaronm13

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mine was at 1.028 at day 4 and got down to 1.020 by day 7 and i held around 72f for the last couple days also. i soft crashed at day 10 and it was still at 1.020 then so i figured it was done so moved my process on to dry hop. dry hopped at 50f this time for 3 days. ill get an idea what its like tonight when i keg it.
I'd be delighted at this stage if I got down to 1.020. Might just hold fire and hope for the best. Mashed at 152 so can't be that. I was all out of oxygen so had to rely on holding the hose on my Grainfather up high to get oxygen into the wort. Also underpitched a bit. Instead of the standard .75 million/ml I did .55 so maybe that was too much. Usually do around .60 with London Fog and have no problems.
 
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i basically just hoped for the best and ended up better then i thought i was going to. hopefully youll at least get into the low 20s not sure there is much else you can do at this point, maybe feed it some dextrose to kick up fermentation again but i'd probably let it ride. good luck.
 

aaronm13

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i basically just hoped for the best and ended up better then i thought i was going to. hopefully youll at least get into the low 20s not sure there is much else you can do at this point, maybe feed it some dextrose to kick up fermentation again but i'd probably let it ride. good luck.
Was reading about adding some US-05 which I have but doubt it would do much. Will probably just let it ride as you say. Hope your beer turns out good. Keep us posted.
 
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Has anyone used ABV Aromazyme yet? Got a small pack of it to try so temped to use it when I dry hop during the week. Don't want to be changing too many variables in my process at the same time.
I have read about and would really like to know how well it does at the homebrew level. Let us know if you end up trying it!
 

Frieds

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Noticed Narrow Gauge used Turbinado in one of their latest releases. What character is that adding in comparison to just using dextrose?
 

tbaldwin000

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dry hop after terminal gravity and after cold crash:
35g citra
30g sabro
15g mosaic
That's a small dry hop, what's the batch size?

You won't get better results from Lalbrew New England, I'd steer clear of it, Verdant is a much better yeast. Underpitch the Verdant (say 1/2 or 1/3 the normal rate) and get it to around 23C (73-74F) during primary to get more from it. You won't get off flavours at that temp, it likes the heat.
 

tbaldwin000

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Noticed Narrow Gauge used Turbinado in one of their latest releases. What character is that adding in comparison to just using dextrose?
Turbinado has some small amount of the molasses left unrefined, so it will add a small amount of unfermentable, caramelly sugars. Dextrose will all ferment away.
 

VirginiaHops1

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View attachment 721590

Made the OP recipe back to back with one difference in each. Left used white wheat while the right used red wheat. I was a little thrown off by the color difference.
Which maltsters? That seems like a rather drastic color change for that one minor difference, even though lovibond seems to vary slightly between red/white wheat and between maltsters
 

BeerFst

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View attachment 721590

Made the OP recipe back to back with one difference in each. Left used white wheat while the right used red wheat. I was a little thrown off by the color difference.
Is this what they looked like going into the fermentor? Looks like accidental oxidation on the left there. Attached is a beer I made last week with ~50% wheat, 4 lbs of which was white wheat
 

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gencinjay

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Is this what they looked like going into the fermentor?
Yes. I really don't think it's oxidation. I thought maybe a different maltster for the main grains could do it too, but that doesn't seem to be the case anymore. I have brewed a few batches including pale ales with the white wheat version of this grain recipe also and got the same color. Could 6 batches have been oxidized? Yes, but I haven't detected it in the taste at all. The one in the picture, in particular, is very good IMO. The photo in my profile was my first try at this recipe which when I read my notes used red wheat also, which is why I made the switch again with this one. My only other thought is scorching?
 

HopsAreGood

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View attachment 721590

Made the OP recipe back to back with one difference in each. Left used white wheat while the right used red wheat. I was a little thrown off by the color difference.
White wheat lovibind is generally 2.5-3. Briess lists their white wheat at 2.5 and their red wheat at 2.3, which is virtually identical. I suppose a different maltster may have a slighter darker color but the difference in the picture is quite drastic. I’d have to suspect something else is going on to get to that darker brownish color on the left.
 

BeerFst

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Yes. I really don't think it's oxidation. I thought maybe a different maltster for the main grains could do it too, but that doesn't seem to be the case anymore. I have brewed a few batches including pale ales with the white wheat version of this grain recipe also and got the same color. Could 6 batches have been oxidized? Yes, but I haven't detected it in the taste at all. The one in the picture, in particular, is very good IMO. The photo in my profile was my first try at this recipe which when I read my notes used red wheat also, which is why I made the switch again with this one. My only other thought is scorching?
yeah seems odd to have hit every single beer except this one red wheat one.

That was rahr white wheat in my photo
 
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