American IPA "Northeast" style IPA

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anteater8

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Slightly off topic, but I know appearance is very important to this style and people like to take photos of their beers. Its hard to take a picture of a NEIPA and capture its color well, especially depending on the light. I'm no photography expert, but I found this trick online and thought I'd share. Use the "pro" setting on your phone camera, and change these two settings:
  • ISO - higher value equals lighter color
  • F1.5 - higher value equals lighter color
The key is to find a balance between the two where you're not losing too much definition in the photo.
 

Tyler B

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Slightly off topic, but I know appearance is very important to this style and people like to take photos of their beers. Its hard to take a picture of a NEIPA and capture its color well, especially depending on the light. I'm no photography expert, but I found this trick online and thought I'd share. Use the "pro" setting on your phone camera, and change these two settings:
  • ISO - higher value equals lighter color
  • F1.5 - higher value equals lighter color
The key is to find a balance between the two where you're not losing too much definition in the photo.
While we are off topic... This is assuming shutter speed is kept constant after each of these adjustments. Otherwise, on many cameras, the shutter speed will just increase to compensate for the increased ISO sensitivity and larger aperture to "correctly" expose the picture (the same as it was previously).

Higher ISO increases the cameras light sensitivity, but at the cost of more grainy pictures. This is good for low light situations.

Lowering the f-number increases the size of your aperture and let's more light into the camera. This also decreases the width of your plane of focus and makes the background blurry.

Decreasing the shutter speed is the other way to let more light into your camera. This often times results in motion blur though. Increasing the shutter speed will "freeze" action (think sports photography.

Sorry for the photography lesson, but if you understand those three things, you've got the basics of photography down. It might also open the door for another really expensive hobby... Proceed cautiously!
 

Tyler B

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Interesting, One thing that I really like about S04 is the fact that the krausen drops really easily and doesn’t hang around. Every time I’ve used 1318 the krausen That never goes away just annoys me. I like the fact that SO4 gets started quick, finishes quick, and everything drops to the bottom of the fermenter like a brick. It’s just really easy to work with.
OK, back on topic. My thinking with K-97 was that the krausen might help protect the beer and prevent oxidation. It might also help with the hazy appearance. Not really sure though.
 

HopsAreGood

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OK, back on topic. My thinking with K-97 was that the krausen might help protect the beer and prevent oxidation. It might also help with the hazy appearance. Not really sure though.
Prevent oxidation while in the fermenter? This shouldn’t really be an issue. Do you mean while opening the fermenter?
 

Tyler B

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Prevent oxidation while in the fermenter? This shouldn’t really be an issue. Do you mean while opening the fermenter?
Just in general, yeah. Any time oxygen might come in contact with the beer. I assumed the layer of Krausen couldn't hurt. Mayne I'm wrong though. Also, I racked to the keg from under the krausen the only time I used K-97.
 

popquizkid

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Just in general, yeah. Any time oxygen might come in contact with the beer. I assumed the layer of Krausen couldn't hurt. Mayne I'm wrong though. Also, I racked to the keg from under the krausen the only time I used K-97.
Any time there is active yeast oxidation is not a problem as the yeast will consume the oxygen. Obviously a krausen means the yeast are more active, but they still are active after the krausen drops for a period of time as fermentation finishes up.
 

Noob_Brewer

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NEIPA - Columbus (boil) - Ekuanot, Citra, Amarillo. Came out awesome. Beautiful bright and fresh citrus flavor and aroma. Has a nice tartness on the front end that ends with straight citrus flavor. Aroma still outstanding given this was kegged on 6/5/20. Ekuanot was emphasized more in the whirlpool and citra/amarillo emphasized more in dry hop. No 'green peppers" from the ekuanot at all.

IMG_7334.jpg
IMG_7331.jpg
 

Beerdrinker85

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stickyfinger

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Wow, that was a great listen. I like Aaron a lot. he seems great and i think his philosophy of trying **** a lot and stumbling onto great thongs is advice we can all use to get out of our ruts and dogmas...

i guess i need to do a dry hop at 50F next and see what I think. Sounds awesome in many ways, just hard to believe it will taste good. Maybe there goes another dogma!
 

stickyfinger

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Has anyone used Imperial Pub in NEIPA? I tried it on a bitter and really like it. seems pretty different from wlp002 or wy1968. More jammy and rich somehow maybe? I love the flocking and have liked wlp002 in neipa. Also like the lower attenuation.
 

stickyfinger

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Nice, I just bought a pound of it yesterday and I wonder how much did you use?
I did 2 oz/gal at 73F after a cold crash. I think 1 oz/gal wouldbe good too probably. Very potent. I heard janish say idaho 7 is the best in hopstand. Might start using it on all of my ipas in the hop stand
 

hopfenstopfen

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Great CB&B Podacst with New Anthem. Reaffirms a lot of things I’ve been saying for a while now.
They are putting out some really excellent NEIPAs, I’m fortunate to get them pretty regularly these days. They gave a recipe for Steez in a recent issue of CB&B. I find that it has many similarities to Treehouse’s Julius (many ingredients in common w/ clone attempts), though I haven’t had Julius in a long time. Their website used to list light munich in the grain bill & their CB&B Steez recipe lists Belgian biscuit & Omega British ale V. I’m thinking of trying biscuit & omega in my next brew.

Their newest is outstanding: The Amen Break - New Anthem Beer Project - Untappd
 

couchsending

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They are putting out some really excellent NEIPAs, I’m fortunate to get them pretty regularly these days. They gave a recipe for Steez in a recent issue of CB&B. I find that it has many similarities to Treehouse’s Julius (many ingredients in common w/ clone attempts), though I haven’t had Julius in a long time. Their website used to list light munich in the grain bill & their CB&B Steez recipe lists Belgian biscuit & Omega British ale V. I’m thinking of trying biscuit & omega in my next brew.

Their newest is outstanding: The Amen Break - New Anthem Beer Project - Untappd
Yeah I’ve never had their stuff although I saw that recipe a while ago. Clearly a lot has changed in their process since that recipe was written.
 

couchsending

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I’ve probably gone through 500 or so cans by now maybe a bit more. Took a while to figure out exactly how carbonated the beer needed to be, how cold, how long the liquid line needed to be, how much pressure to put on the keg, etc.

Got a method where I’m pretty confident my TPO levels are solid. I don’t experience any degredation over say 45 days in the fridge. I’d be a little hesitant to leave them warm for a while but I should probably do that just to see how they hold up. I might lose a bit more beer than I should when canning but if that means better more stable beer in the can I’m fine with it.
 

HopsAreGood

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I’ve probably gone through 500 or so cans by now maybe a bit more. Took a while to figure out exactly how carbonated the beer needed to be, how cold, how long the liquid line needed to be, how much pressure to put on the keg, etc.

Got a method where I’m pretty confident my TPO levels are solid. I don’t experience any degredation over say 45 days in the fridge. I’d be a little hesitant to leave them warm for a while but I should probably do that just to see how they hold up. I might lose a bit more beer than I should when canning but if that means better more stable beer in the can I’m fine with it.
What canning machine do you have/use?
 

crusader1612

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I'm working on a recipe for my first NEIPA and wondering what yeast you all recommend. I don't have access to liquid yeast where I live, so my choices are basically what I currently have on hand. That is... Voss Kveik, London ESB, US-05, S-04, S-33, K-97, and T-58.

Any of these (or a combination of them) that you recommend? I was leaning towards Kveik or S-04.
I'd personally god Voss Kveik, or London ESB.
(Use Lots of Mosaic if you're using Voss)
 

crusader1612

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View attachment 688774

This is my favorite NEIPA I've made in a while. Aroma is mango, guava, lime, pineapple, floral. Flavor is more of the same plus some peach. The thing I like about this beer the most is the flavor is very full and saturated, but the beer comes across very balanced and light.


14 lb 2 row
3 lb flaked oats
0.75 lb wheat
0.25 lb honey malt

0.5 oz Warrior (19 IBU)
1 oz Citra whirlpool (4 IBU)
2 oz Motueka whirlpool (4 IBU)
3 oz Citra dry hop
6 oz Motueka dry hop

Whirlfoc 10 min
Yeast nutrient 10 min

Imperial Barbarian gen 3

O.G. = 1.063
F.G. = 1.010
ABV = 7%

Moueka is a massively under reated hop in an NEIPA IMO. Used with the likes of citra and mosaic, it does wonders, super tropical.
 

Rainy

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Advice on how to brew NEIPAs from Verdant (one of Europe's top producers of the style): Verdant IPA Yeast - Home Brewing Competition

I think we first brewed this beer in early 2016 on a 200L kit! We had just managed to get hold of some rare as rocking horse **** Galaxy hops and it was a no brainer to pair it up with Citra in a NEIPA. The aim for the beer was and still is to be pretty full on flavour and aroma wise, not shying away from the aggressive nature of Galaxy. It’s a pretty brash hop, harsh bittering qualities coupled with mega high dry hop polyphenols makes for a very ‘green’ experience early doors. Skilful use of the hop and a bit of patience helps bring the tropical and creamy nature to the fore. In my experience different hop varieties make for differing amounts of haze or ‘murk’ in the finished beer. With sharks we use the top 2 murk producing varieties out there! Expect an opaque light yellow creamy/yoghurt affair that has a soft smooth body leading to an assertive finish. Aromas should leap out, flavours should fully saturate and if brewed well it should have a lovely fluffy white head on it that lasts.

With regards to a suitable water profile for ESNW I would encourage home brewers to experiment. Get a good accurate water report for your area specifically focussing on ppm’s for Calcium, Chloride, Magnesium, Sodium, Sulphate and Bicarbonate. Down in Cornwall we have predominantly soft water ranging from ‘moderately soft’ to ‘very soft’. This basically means ppm’s for all the cations and anions are very low, it also means we have a great base line water source for building style profiles. I know some brewers who utilise reverse osmosis techniques to almost entirely demineralise their water, but I like the fact that all we do is run it through a sediment filter and then a carbon filter. This removes any rust or debris from old mains water pipes and also the volatile low level chlorine used to kill bacteria. Working with the water in your area, in my opinion, is one of the most exciting parts of brewing that’s similar to the concept of ‘terroir’ in farming. With sharks we push Chloride up to around 230ppm, we leave Sulphate at base mains level (10ppm), we elevate Sodium to around 50ppm. The Sodium Chloride is added to the boil and the Calcium Chloride to the mash. By doing this we create a very soft mouthfeel but without elevating Calcium levels above 100ppm. You don’t need to try and emulate this profile though, in fact I would suggest not too if your base line is too far off initially. It’s far more important to work with what you’ve got and tweak from there.
Other tips for success with a NEIPA would be to monitor you PH’s. Mash should be 5.2-5.3 at 20 degrees C. Pre-boil 5-5.1, post boil 4.9-5.05, sparge 5.5-6, post ferment 4.3, post dry hop 4.5-4.8. Oxygen will ruin your beer faster than anything else. Trying to mitigate this at home-brew level is going to be tricky. I would suggest closed transfer under pressure to separate purged vessel for dry hopping, force carbonating and not bottle conditioning. Do not hunt for biotransformation, wait for the ferment to finish, make sure it passes a forced diacetyl test, soft crash to 15 and then dry hop. You will avoid hop creep this way. Hop creep is something we don’t like at Verdant, it makes for an over attenuated beer that that has far more diacetyl to clear up.
Regarding our yeast, pitch at 18 and let rise to 19 and hold. Free rise to 22 for D rest once gravity is at about 1.030. The dry yeast version rages! Expect a massive krausen and potentially higher than anticipated attenuation on generation 1.

Recipe (ballpark amounts based of generic 19L packaged batch)

OG = 1.065
FG = 1.015
ABV = 6.5%
IBU = 27
EBC = 7.3


3.3kg Crisp Extra Pale
0.8kg Simpsons Golden promise
0.45kg Flaked Oats
0.45kg Weyermann Carapils (Simpsons Dextrin works well also)
0.22kg Crisp Wheat Malt
0.22kg Flaked Wheat

Single step 45min mash @ 67 deg C

3g Magnum (12% AA) @ First Wort Hops
60 min boil

Yeast-Vit @ 15minutes
80degree 30 min whirlpool/hopstand = 30g Galaxy & 60g Citra

Pitch one 11g packet of Verdant IPA yeast

Post ferment dry hop = 120g Galaxy T90’s & 180g Citra T90’s (16gpl dry hop)

Dry hop rouse and crash to zero. Keep hop contact time to less than 72 hours if possible.

Even though we’ve given you this the competition though is not to brew the best clone of Even Sharks Need Water, just to be clear.
Main points for me are:
* dry hop at 15C after fermentation and passsing VDK rest
* high Cl (>200ppm) and keeping Ca below 100ppm, by adding Cacl in Mash and NaCL to the boil.
* controlling pH throughout the brewing process
* not an excessive amount of wheat or oats, while the mouthfeel of their beers is really thick.

So nothing extremely surprising, but nice to see it all come together in this post.

And just great to see how willing they are to share their processes (and now even their yeast which should be some mutated version of LA III), like many other great craft brewers (e.g. via the CB&B podcasts)
 
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couchsending

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Any thoughts on this one? It’s obviously a little cheaper.

yeah I don’t really know... I think I read some early reviews that aren’t that good?

however I did order some of the 500ml cans from Morebeer and have been really happy with them. Had to get an adapter for the SL1 to use a van that size but they’re cheaper than getting cans through Oktober. That’s the biggest kick in the shorts on canning, the price of shipping those boxes of cans. It’s insane.
 

secretlevel

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Here’s some obnoxious foam for yah.

Nothing but Nelson
6%

Was lucky to score some Freestyle Nelson from a friend who gets to select. Definitely never had any Nelson quite like it. Got a bit of their Riwaka too.


View attachment 689338
This is bordering on brewer's version of adult content :bravo:

Any tips on getting a nice frothy head?


Advice on how to brew NEIPAs from Verdant (one of Europe's top producers of the style): Verdant IPA Yeast - Home Brewing Competition



Main points for me are:
* dry hop at 15C after fermentation and passsing VDK rest
* high Cl (>200ppm) and keeping Ca below 100ppm, by adding Cacl in Mash and NaCL to the boil.
* controlling pH throughout the brewing process
* not an excessive amount of wheat or oats, while the mouthfeel of their beers is really thick.

So nothing extremely surprising, but nice to see it all come together in this post.

And just great to see how willing they are to share their processes (and now even their yeast which should be some mutated version of LA III), like many other great craft brewers (e.g. via the CB&B podcasts)
With my water profile, which is pretty neutral, the more CaCl I add, the higher Ca goes... Does anyone manage this piece? Does NaCl negate this in any way?
 

couchsending

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As far as frothy head goes. Proper carbonation, step mashing, and treating the beer correctly when it’s in the fermenter are the key things to focus on. There’s not one thing that will get you there. This beer does have a bit of under modified malt in it which may or may not be helping. Otherwise just 2row and 2% Belgian Aromatic for color.

Permanent stable haze with no high protein adjuncts...

When it comes to Cl in beers. The Cl gets chalky almost astringent when it’s in the presence of elevated levels of Ca. When you add CaCl to only the mash, a large chunk of the Ca actually gets left behind in the mash due to numerous reactions but the Cl makes it through.

NaCl additions can up Cl levels without the Ca. There’s also MgCl and KCl that will add Cl without the Ca. Water software should help with all that although most don’t have KCl as an option but you can find the ion content online.
 

Rainy

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With my water profile, which is pretty neutral, the more CaCl I add, the higher Ca goes... Does anyone manage this piece? Does NaCl negate this in any way?
It's actually discussed in the link that I posted.

The main aim is to be <100ppm for Ca. I think this is also mentioned in a recent BYO tips from the pro's article about brewing NEIPAs.
It seems too high Ca together with high Cl leads to a chalky taste

So for a NEIPA water profile targetting 150-200ppm Cl, depending on the profile of your starting water, you need to find a balance between NaCl (Sodium Chloride) and CaCL2 additions.

The choice between mash and boil additions is something I don't completely understand. I think I read somewhere that from your mash salt additions not everything ends up in the boil as some stays in the left over grain, while with boil salt additions everything you add ends up in the final wort.
But it could also be connected to mash pH though.

Maybe someone more knowledgeable could comment.

Edit: it seems a more knowledgeable someone already commented before me. :)
 

TBryerton

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As far as frothy head goes. Proper carbonation, step mashing, and treating the beer correctly when it’s in the fermenter are the key things to focus on. There’s not one thing that will get you there. This beer does have a bit of under modified malt in it which may or may not be helping. Otherwise just 2row and 2% Belgian Aromatic for color.

Permanent stable haze with no high protein adjuncts...

When it comes to Cl in beers. The Cl gets chalky almost astringent when it’s in the presence of elevated levels of Ca. When you add CaCl to only the mash, a large chunk of the Ca actually gets left behind in the mash due to numerous reactions but the Cl makes it through.

NaCl additions can up Cl levels without the Ca. There’s also MgCl and KCl that will add Cl without the Ca. Water software should help with all that although most don’t have KCl as an option but you can find the ion content online.
That's very impressive. What are you carbonating at? If you don't mind, can elaborate a little on what you mean when you say treat correctly in fermenter?

Good to know in regards to CaCl in mash vs boil. I've been playing around with Other Half's All Together recipe and was adding 50% of water additions to mash and the rest to the boil, and haven't had much luck with their water recommendations. I keep lowering the CaCl every batch, and I'm still at a point where it's way too high. I'm not sure how they get away with it but I'm not a fan of huge CaCl additions in my beers.
 

VirginiaHops1

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The choice between mash and boil additions is something I don't completely understand. I think I read somewhere that from your mash salt additions not everything ends up in the boil as some stays in the left over grain, while with boil salt additions everything you add ends up in the final wort.
But it could also be connected to mash pH though.
I've read that too. Specifically...
"Calcium reacts with phosphates released by the malt and forms an insoluble precipitate which will be left behind or precipitate out later". Don't have a source but sounds like something one of the water gurus would've said
 

Rainy

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I've read that too. Specifically...
"Calcium reacts with phosphates released by the malt and forms an insoluble precipitate which will be left behind or precipitate out later". Don't have a source but sounds like something one of the water gurus would've said
Thanks! This explains what @couchsending was saying just before me:
When you add CaCl to only the mash, a large chunk of the Ca actually gets left behind in the mash due to numerous reactions but the Cl makes it through.
 
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