American IPA "Northeast" style IPA

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

SRJHops

Why did the rabbit like NEIPA's so much?
Joined
Sep 24, 2018
Messages
453
Reaction score
137
Location
Minneapolis
This is bordering on brewer's version of adult content :bravo:

Any tips on getting a nice frothy head?




With my water profile, which is pretty neutral, the more CaCl I add, the higher Ca goes... Does anyone manage this piece? Does NaCl negate this in any way?
I don't know about frothy, but for improved head retention I'm a big believer in using carafoam and flaked barley.
 

Rainy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2018
Messages
64
Reaction score
51
This thread is informative but the brewing science section is also a treasure trove of nerdy brewing info, for people who like to go down that rabbit hole
Yeah, I love nerding out on brewing science, even though I don't really have the proper chemical and microbiological background to fully grasp everything. :)
Problem with the brewing science articles though is that a lot of the stuff when pulled out of context does not directly translate to practical brewing practices (e.g. the shellhammer study on hop saturation when using cascade).
It is great though to get a better understanding of the processes (e.g. dissolving of hop components into a water/alcohol mixture) that are involved in brewing, which helps a lot in getting a better gut feeling of what's going on.
 

Tyler B

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2018
Messages
231
Reaction score
88
So much amazing info in here!

Ive got another recipe question... I was able to get 100g (3.5oz) each of Galaxy, Mosaic, and Citra.

Do you think I should split them all equally and use all 300g (10.5oz) in a 1:1:1 ratio? Or split them in a different ratio like 3:2:1 (8.8oz total) or 2:2:1 (6.2oz total) without using all of them?
 

Clyde McCoy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2020
Messages
122
Reaction score
69
As far as frothy head goes. Proper carbonation, step mashing, and treating the beer correctly when it’s in the fermenter are the key things to focus on. There’s not one thing that will get you there. This beer does have a bit of under modified malt in it which may or may not be helping. Otherwise just 2row and 2% Belgian Aromatic for color.

Permanent stable haze with no high protein adjuncts...

When it comes to Cl in beers. The Cl gets chalky almost astringent when it’s in the presence of elevated levels of Ca. When you add CaCl to only the mash, a large chunk of the Ca actually gets left behind in the mash due to numerous reactions but the Cl makes it through.

NaCl additions can up Cl levels without the Ca. There’s also MgCl and KCl that will add Cl without the Ca. Water software should help with all that although most don’t have KCl as an option but you can find the ion content online.
I see Verdant states "Sodium Chloride is added to the boil and the Calcium Chloride to the mash."

Why would adding NaCl to the boil vs. to the mash effect the precipitation of Ca? Ca "inverts malt phosphate to precipitated alkaline phosphate," but why would the presence of NaCl affect this process? @mabrungard ?

I think your point here is not to add calcium chloride to the boil, where it can't react with malt phosphates. Still not sure why it matters to add NaCl to the boil.
 

couchsending

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jun 21, 2016
Messages
2,410
Reaction score
1,439
I see Verdant states "Sodium Chloride is added to the boil and the Calcium Chloride to the mash."

Why would adding NaCl to the boil vs. to the mash effect the precipitation of Ca? Ca "inverts malt phosphate to precipitated alkaline phosphate," but why would the presence of NaCl affect this process? @mabrungard ?

I think your point here is not to add calcium chloride to the boil, where it can't react with malt phosphates. Still not sure why it matters to add NaCl to the boil.
Add NaCl to the kettle to make sure the maximum makes it into the FV, it doesn’t get left behind with the spent grains. Not 100% sure on Na in regards to how much would stay behind if any at all. Never seen a study about that.

Add CaCl to the mash for numerous necessary reactions in the mash but also to ensure that a decent amount of the Ca stays in the mash, yet Cl will make it through into the final product.

There’s no reason to add salts to the mash that don’t benefit the mash. Just add them to the kettle or fermenter.

The amount of calcium left behind also depends on the amount of Bicarbonate in the water to begin with.
 

Beer-lord

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jan 17, 2012
Messages
2,038
Reaction score
448
Location
Burbs of the Big Easy
New hop product introduced by Barth Haas: LUPOMAX™ | Haas

Seems to be something in between T90 and Cryo pellets as the advice is to use 70% of what you would use when using T90 pellets, while with cryo pellets it's more to use 50% of the normal amount.
Yakima's site says to only use 70% of the normal amount but I'm wondering how to account for it in Beersmith or Brewfather.
I grabbed some Citra and Mosaic and can't wait to try it out.
 

anteater8

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2015
Messages
256
Reaction score
190
Location
Portland
So much amazing info in here!

Ive got another recipe question... I was able to get 100g (3.5oz) each of Galaxy, Mosaic, and Citra.

Do you think I should split them all equally and use all 300g (10.5oz) in a 1:1:1 ratio? Or split them in a different ratio like 3:2:1 (8.8oz total) or 2:2:1 (6.2oz total) without using all of them?
I've had the best luck using Galaxy in smaller amounts, lately only just using 1-2 oz in the dry hop only. However, I would aim for ~12 oz total in the whirlpool + dry hop for this style so I'd either go 1:1:1 or get some more hops.
 

HopsAreGood

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 13, 2019
Messages
316
Reaction score
548
Location
New Jersey
Add NaCl to the kettle to make sure the maximum makes it into the FV, it doesn’t get left behind with the spent grains. Not 100% sure on Na in regards to how much would stay behind if any at all. Never seen a study about that.

Add CaCl to the mash for numerous necessary reactions in the mash but also to ensure that a decent amount of the Ca stays in the mash, yet Cl will make it through into the final product.

There’s no reason to add salts to the mash that don’t benefit the mash. Just add them to the kettle or fermenter.

The amount of calcium left behind also depends on the amount of Bicarbonate in the water to begin with.
So what salts out of the following would you add to the mash and which to the kettle/boil:

CaCl
NaCl
SO4 (gypsum)
MgSo4
 

VirginiaHops1

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 25, 2018
Messages
905
Reaction score
523
Location
Vienna, Va
So what salts out of the following would you add to the mash and which to the kettle/boil:

CaCl
NaCl
SO4 (gypsum)
MgSo4
Calcium is what's most beneficial to the mash, so you should add most of your gypsum and calcium chloride there. Everything else can go in the boil. I don't use much Epsom salt but I hold my NaCl for boil and put most of my CaCl and gypsum in the mash. The only downside is having to remember to do all your boil additions which I have forgotten once or twice. I also usually add some more acid to the boil for hazy IPAs to try to get the KO ph lower. I have some KCl that I bought awhile back meaning to experiment with and have been too lazy to even get it out yet.
 

HopsAreGood

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 13, 2019
Messages
316
Reaction score
548
Location
New Jersey
Calcium is what's most beneficial to the mash, so you should add most of your gypsum and calcium chloride there. Everything else can go in the boil. I don't use much Epsom salt but I hold my NaCl for boil and put most of my CaCl and gypsum in the mash. The only downside is having to remember to do all your boil additions which I have forgotten once or twice. I also usually add some more acid to the boil for hazy IPAs to try to get the KO ph lower. I have some KCl that I bought awhile back meaning to experiment with and have been too lazy to even get it out yet.
I’ve been putting all four of these in my mash, and calculating exactly to the numbers I want, for probably the last 30 or so brews. I’ll try splitting them up how you suggest and see if I can notice any kind of difference. I usually start with about 7.25 gallons (full volume) and have about 5.75 in the kettle. So I’ll have to do Two separate calculations of the different water volumes.
 

VirginiaHops1

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 25, 2018
Messages
905
Reaction score
523
Location
Vienna, Va
I’ve been putting all four of these in my mash, and calculating exactly to the numbers I want, for probably the last 30 or so brews. I’ll try splitting them up how do you suggest and see if I can notice any kind of difference. I usually start with about 7.25 gallons (full volume) and have about 5.75 in the kettle. So I’ll have to do Two separate calculations of the different water volumes.
Yeah, I honestly don't know how much of a difference it makes. I've just gotten into the habit of doing it. Once in awhile I try to test different variables like that, problem is I have brewing ADD and hardly ever can bring myself to do the same recipe repeatedly to isolate and test different variables like that.
 

HopsAreGood

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 13, 2019
Messages
316
Reaction score
548
Location
New Jersey
Yeah, I honestly don't know how much of a difference it makes. I've just gotten into the habit of doing it. Once in awhile I try to test different variables like that, problem is I have brewing ADD and hardly ever can bring myself to do the same recipe repeatedly to isolate and test different variables like that.
Brewing ADD is real. I’ve Had strong intentions numerous times of brewing the same beer over and over and over, while switching out only one variable, and have probably never done it once. Oh well
 

HopsAreGood

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 13, 2019
Messages
316
Reaction score
548
Location
New Jersey
New hop product introduced by Barth Haas: LUPOMAX™ | Haas

Seems to be something in between T90 and Cryo pellets as the advice is to use 70% of what you would use when using T90 pellets, while with cryo pellets it's more to use 50% of the normal amount.
Just ordered a pound each of the Citra, mosaic, and Sabro.
 

Dgallo

If you ain’t first, you’re last Ricky Bobby
Joined
Jan 15, 2017
Messages
3,421
Reaction score
5,289
Location
Albany
Seems like the lupo is the same cost as cryo so what is the advantage of you have to use more than cryo?
Where does it say you have to use more of this than cryo?

Im reading it as you CAN use more of this in your total hopbill, getting more flavor without the the astringency you would if using a similar amount of cryo
 
Last edited:

HopsAreGood

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 13, 2019
Messages
316
Reaction score
548
Location
New Jersey
It’s pretty confusing to me to be honest...it does come across as very similar to cryo in where they recommend using 50% by weight and with these they recommend using 70% by weight.

They use the descriptors of consistency and reliability over and over. I watched the video twice and I’m still a little confused but whatever, it was literally released today so I’m sure there will feedback once people get their hands on it.
 

BeerFst

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 18, 2014
Messages
303
Reaction score
95
Location
Patchogue
It's not the same cost. Those are 2oz packs on YVH for the same cost as 1oz of Cryo (assuming $5). Using the suggested usage rates, that 1oz cryo = 2 oz pellets, 2oz lupo = 2.8oz pellets

I am also reading it as @Dgallo where i would use the same dry hop rate as my recipe using normal pellets and get an "extra" 1.4X benefit for the same loss rate. If I was a big brewery without a centrifuge and wanted to reduce my overhead, maybe i would reduce the hops by the 30%.

Lupo seems to fill the dry hop gap, where incognito is intended for whirlpool.

also yet to be determined if, like cryo, you need to pair lupo with some normal T90, but I'm guessing that's where the 20% green material comes from (70-50=20, based on equivalency rate)
 

stickyfinger

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2009
Messages
2,110
Reaction score
501
Location
Hudson Valley
If I normally use 12 oz of t90 pellets for dry hop, would a 6 oz dry hop of cryo taste the same? What is the reason for using these concentrated hop products? Can you add some of them at least in place of t90 to get more flavor without the vegetable matter? why avoid the vegetable matter other than wort savings? on a homebrew scale, i can just brew a little more wort to compensate for hop losses. I guess my question is are there reasons to use cryo (or maybe lupo) that go beyond the savings in wort. i haven't used cryo much obviously. i can get amazing prices on t90 and i seem to be able to use a ton of it and still love the beer. maybe i'm missing something.

holy crap, i can't believe the intense flavor on this Idaho 7 ipa i brewed. damn, it's a strong hop!
 

couchsending

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jun 21, 2016
Messages
2,410
Reaction score
1,439
Cryo is a much more resinous, oily taste/aroma as compared to the same hop in T-90 format.

if you care about haze cryo hopped beers will have less “haze” than those hopped with regular T-90. The polyphenol content is much lower in Cryo as it’s found in the bracht of the hops which Cryo has less of.

I think Cryo is interesting and can add a bit of complexity when used in smaller portions of a hop bill. I personally don’t like it in large amounts.
 

emr25

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2015
Messages
123
Reaction score
87
I’m interested in trying a single-hopped Citra NE IPA with a combination of T90, Lupo, and Cryo. Dry hop with 2oz of each, which is ~equivalent to 8.85oz T90 (using 70% factor for Lupo and 50% for Cryo).

Aroma and flavor complexity using all 3 varieties would be interesting, especially in direct comparison to a batch using 100% T90.
 

Beerdrinker85

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 8, 2016
Messages
76
Reaction score
26
Location
Boston
Any thoughts on this one? It’s obviously a little cheaper.

Cryo is a much more resinous, oily taste/aroma as compared to the same hop in T-90 format.

if you care about haze cryo hopped beers will have less “haze” than those hopped with regular T-90. The polyphenol content is much lower in Cryo as it’s found in the bracht of the hops which Cryo has less of.

I think Cryo is interesting and can add a bit of complexity when used in smaller portions of a hop bill. I personally don’t like it in large amounts.
I am about to dry hop my idaho7/citra/mosaic and never used cryo before. I got 5 oz of cryo citra/mosaic/amarillo. How do you suggest me to DH my 6gal because I was about to go for a first DH 2oz citra/mosaic t90.. second DH 3 days later with 1oz of cryo citra and 1oz of cryo mosaic.
 

Frieds

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2019
Messages
65
Reaction score
66
I’m interested in trying a single-hopped Citra NE IPA with a combination of T90, Lupo, and Cryo. Dry hop with 2oz of each, which is ~equivalent to 8.85oz T90 (using 70% factor for Lupo and 50% for Cryo).

Aroma and flavor complexity using all 3 varieties would be interesting, especially in direct comparison to a batch using 100% T90.
I’ve got a single hop citra hazy fermenting right now with T90 & Cryo. The samples so far are tasting pretty good.
 

couchsending

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jun 21, 2016
Messages
2,410
Reaction score
1,439
I’m interested in trying a single-hopped Citra NE IPA with a combination of T90, Lupo, and Cryo. Dry hop with 2oz of each, which is ~equivalent to 8.85oz T90 (using 70% factor for Lupo and 50% for Cryo).

Aroma and flavor complexity using all 3 varieties would be interesting, especially in direct comparison to a batch using 100% T90.
Isn’t Lupo just the HAAS version of cryo? Doubt you’d notice much difference over just Cryo and regular.

Using leaf, Cryo, T-90, and American Noble versions of the same hop at different stages of the process might give you a lot more complexity...
 

Dgallo

If you ain’t first, you’re last Ricky Bobby
Joined
Jan 15, 2017
Messages
3,421
Reaction score
5,289
Location
Albany
It’s pretty confusing to me to be honest...it does come across as very similar to cryo in where they recommend using 50% by weight and with these they recommend using 70% by weight.

They use the descriptors of consistency and reliability over and over. I watched the video twice and I’m still a little confused but whatever, it was literally released today so I’m sure there will feedback once people get their hands on it.
Here is a bulleted response from YVH on how LUPOMAX differs from cryo, Seems to suggest they are more or less the same, however, HAAS bred or uses specific hop lots to ensure higher and more consistent quality with a truer to variety profile.
DE67072C-D6BF-4FCC-803A-A5918FF87206.jpeg
 

emr25

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2015
Messages
123
Reaction score
87
Isn’t Lupo just the HAAS version of cryo? Doubt you’d notice much difference over just Cryo and regular.

Using leaf, Cryo, T-90, and American Noble versions of the same hop at different stages of the process might give you a lot more complexity...
I think there are enough differences to add complexity (even if it just comes down to being processed from different farms / lots). It’d be even better if they brought Incognito to the US homebrew market.
 

Rainy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2018
Messages
64
Reaction score
51
The cryo vs lupomax branding is a bit confusing, as cryo (property of YCH) mainly refers to the technique that is used to make this product. Morevover, brewers that can select can have a specific lot cryo pelletized. I also think that the cryo process of YCH is patented.
So with cryo pellet of a certain hop variety you could still get quite different characteristics depending on the lot you chose. We as homebrewers get maybe more a cryo pellet that is a result of a blend of different lots.

Lupomax on the other hand seems to be a combination of the technique of removing plant material (not really clear how) and the fact that they guarantee year to year consistency, so they need to be blending different lots to achieve this. I wonder if lupomax is then the same for every brewer in the world, or if big brewers still have the possibility to select a lot which are then "lupomax pelletized"

So I think for us homebrewers it might not make such a big difference apart from the different dosing needed (50% vs 70%), but for professional brewers these are quite different products if they can't select for Lupomax, as it takes away a big part of how they can distinguish themselves from other brewers in terms of hoppy beers, namely by hop selection.

One of the Hop and Brew School podcasts explains quite well the whole cryo process and the fact that brewers can select their lots for cryo.
The Lupomax information is for now mainly branding and they do not give a lot of details about their processes.

Edit: It's also quite a different philosphy behind it if you thin of it. Cryo still seems to embrace the fact that hops are an agricultural product and that it can vary from year to year and lot to lot. Lupomax is more the industrial mindset of always wanting to deliver consistent results. So to me it seems they are aiming for quite different markets.
 
Last edited:

emr25

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2015
Messages
123
Reaction score
87
The cryo vs lupomax branding is a bit confusing, as cryo (property of YCH) mainly refers to the technique that is used to make this product. Morevover, brewers that can select can have a specific lot cryo pelletized. I also think that the cryo process of YCH is patented.
So with cryo pellet of a certain hop variety you could still get quite different characteristics depending on the lot you chose. We as homebrewers get maybe more a cryo pellet that is a result of a blend of different lots.

Lupomax on the other hand seems to be a combination of the technique of removing plant material (not really clear how) and the fact that they guarantee year to year consistency, so they need to be blending different lots to achieve this. I wonder if lupomax is then the same for every brewer in the world, or if big brewers still have the possibility to select a lot which are then "lupomax pelletized"

So I think for us homebrewers it might not make such a big difference apart from the different dosing needed (50% vs 70%), but for professional brewers these are quite different products if they can't select for Lupomax, as it takes away a big part of how they can distinguish themselves from other brewers in terms of hoppy beers, namely by hop selection.

One of the Hop and Brew School podcasts explains quite well the whole cryo process and the fact that brewers can select their lots for cryo.
The Lupomax information is for now mainly branding and they do not give a lot of details about their processes.

Edit: It's also quite a different philosphy behind it if you thin of it. Cryo still seems to embrace the fact that hops are an agricultural product and that it can vary from year to year and lot to lot. Lupomax is more the industrial mindset of always wanting to deliver consistent results. So to me it seems they are aiming for quite different markets.
I think a combination of both may be very appealing to brewers of all sizes. Year-to-year consistency in AA, total oils, and flavor compounds (Lupo) for hot side additions and even whirlpool, with brewers getting to add their “personal touch” with hand selected T90 / Cryo in the dry hop (where a majority of flavor is derived in these uber hopped hazy styles).
 

BeerFst

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 18, 2014
Messages
303
Reaction score
95
Location
Patchogue
One of the Hop and Brew School podcasts explains quite well the whole cryo process and the fact that brewers can select their lots for cryo.
The Lupomax information is for now mainly branding and they do not give a lot of details about their processes.

Edit: It's also quite a different philosphy behind it if you thin of it. Cryo still seems to embrace the fact that hops are an agricultural product and that it can vary from year to year and lot to lot. Lupomax is more the industrial mindset of always wanting to deliver consistent results. So to me it seems they are aiming for quite different markets.
I wonder if they let you choose your lots to be made into incognito, or is that a blended "all for one" product as well?
 

Rainy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2018
Messages
64
Reaction score
51
I am quite sure that Barth Haas will provide more detailed information about the processes behind Lupomax when asked, based on how open they were about their processes and products during the dry hop boot camp webinars.
 

Dgallo

If you ain’t first, you’re last Ricky Bobby
Joined
Jan 15, 2017
Messages
3,421
Reaction score
5,289
Location
Albany
Edit: It's also quite a different philosphy behind it if you thin of it. Cryo still seems to embrace the fact that hops are an agricultural product and that it can vary from year to year and lot to lot. Lupomax is more the industrial mindset of always wanting to deliver consistent results. So to me it seems they are aiming for quite different markets.
I think you’re you missing something here. T45 pellets were available long before ych releases cryo hops. Their cryogenic process improved the T45 pellet from being a less wasteful (cut losses) way to bitter to an aroma and flavor product. HAAS has taken this concept and improved on the consistency of high quality. This is a huge thing for all, it’s not two different markets. All brewers, professional and HBer do so many things to produce high quality and consistent beer. This product is going to be a game changer if the consistency proves true, especially for the upper echelon. No longer with TH Haze be Amazing or just ok.
 

Dgallo

If you ain’t first, you’re last Ricky Bobby
Joined
Jan 15, 2017
Messages
3,421
Reaction score
5,289
Location
Albany
I wonder if they let you choose your lots to be made into incognito, or is that a blended "all for one" product as well?
I’m going to say no, or at least not for a little while. But I have a strong feeling incognito will be available to us this fall. IDK If you’re aware but HAAS has become a huge investor in Yakima Valley Hop this past September and that’s why YVH has sole rights to LUPOMAX. That tells me when Incognito is release at a HB size, YVH will be the only ones selling it
 

emr25

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2015
Messages
123
Reaction score
87
I’m going to say no, or at least not for a little while. But I have a strong feeling incognito will be available to us this fall. IDK If you’re aware but HAAS has become a huge investor in Yakima Valley Hop this past September and that’s why YVH has sole rights to LUPOMAX. That tells me when Incognito is release at a HB size, YVH will be the only ones selling it
From the horse’s mouth (via a comment on IG), “we are currently working on a homebrew size unit of INCOGNITO, but more R&D is required so there currently isn’t an ETA.”
 

BeerFst

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 18, 2014
Messages
303
Reaction score
95
Location
Patchogue
I’m going to say no, or at least not for a little while. But I have a strong feeling incognito will be available to us this fall. IDK If you’re aware but HAAS has become a huge investor in Yakima Valley Hop this past September and that’s why YVH has sole rights to LUPOMAX. That tells me when Incognito is release at a HB size, YVH will be the only ones selling it
That's what I thought as well, no lot selection for incognito. YVH noted a "we've got some exciting things coming your way this month" on IG, so I was hoping that incognito was next. That said, it would make a lot of sense to release with the new crop year.

And yeah, as soon as that partnership was announced I was asking on IG when they would get incognito.

I am still sort of debating ordering lupo, but I think I'll wait until next crop year, which really isn't that far away anyway.
 

Rainy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2018
Messages
64
Reaction score
51
I’m going to say no, or at least not for a little while. But I have a strong feeling incognito will be available to us this fall. IDK If you’re aware but HAAS has become a huge investor in Yakima Valley Hop this past September and that’s why YVH has sole rights to LUPOMAX. That tells me when Incognito is release at a HB size, YVH will be the only ones selling it
I did not know about the connection between YVH and Haas. Great to see though that both YVH/Bart Haas and YCH have been investing so much in new hop products and processing techniques in order to provide better and more consistent hop flavour and aroma.
In general, I am also impressed with how both YVH/Bart Haas and YCH really take the effort to educate their customers and how they don't forget about the home brewer in all of this.
With all the webinars available online and the hop and brew school podcast, the hop companies provide a huge amount of detailed information about hops and how to use them, which would otherwise only be known by professional brewers.
And then there's still other resources like master brewers podcast and CB&B podcast.

The problem with all these different products becoming available to us home brewers though , is that it becomes even harder to decide where to use each product. Although it's always nice to have "more colors to paint with". :)
 

Dgallo

If you ain’t first, you’re last Ricky Bobby
Joined
Jan 15, 2017
Messages
3,421
Reaction score
5,289
Location
Albany
That's what I thought as well, no lot selection for incognito. YVH noted a "we've got some exciting things coming your way this month" on IG, so I was hoping that incognito was next. That said, it would make a lot of sense to release with the new crop year.

And yeah, as soon as that partnership was announced I was asking on IG when they would get incognito.

I am still sort of debating ordering lupo, but I think I'll wait until next crop year, which really isn't that far away anyway.
IF they still have it Available when they release the 2020 AUS & NZ hops, I’ll grab a few 2oz packs for a test run
 

braindead

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2017
Messages
142
Reaction score
34
Verdant released a recipe yesterday and a lot of useful info.
Do you guys soft crash to 15 before dry hopping??

"Do not hunt for biotransformation, wait for the ferment to finish, make sure it passes a forced diacetyl test, soft crash to 15 and then dry hop. You will avoid hop creep this way"
 

Dgallo

If you ain’t first, you’re last Ricky Bobby
Joined
Jan 15, 2017
Messages
3,421
Reaction score
5,289
Location
Albany
Verdant released a recipe yesterday and a lot of useful info.
Do you guys soft crash to 15 before dry hopping??

"Do not hunt for biotransformation, wait for the ferment to finish, make sure it passes a forced diacetyl test, soft crash to 15 and then dry hop. You will avoid hop creep this way"
Colder than that for me. I’m at the equivalent of 10*c
 

braindead

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2017
Messages
142
Reaction score
34
So you don't do an early biotransformation dry hop then?
At what temp do you get suck back into the fermenter?
 
Top