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beerme70

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I am in the process of building a small pub room in the basement. Now here's the issue. I have no real viable means of supplying water to the bar, and no way to install drainage. I have a double bin stainless kitchen sink I want to use. I was thinking of something like a 30 plastic water barrel under the counter and a small pump from GreatBrewEh.com, and then some 6 gallon buckets to catch drain water when the drinking session is over. The water barrel would have to be treated so the water doesn't get funky (I was thinking AquaMira). The sole use of this would be to clean beer glasses and nothing else. Any thoughts? Or am I basically screwed?
 

aprichman

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I am in the process of building a small pub room in the basement. Now here's the issue. I have no real viable means of supplying water to the bar, and no way to install drainage. I have a double bin stainless kitchen sink I want to use. I was thinking of something like a 30 plastic water barrel under the counter and a small pump from GreatBrewEh.com, and then some 6 gallon buckets to catch drain water when the drinking session is over. The water barrel would have to be treated so the water doesn't get funky (I was thinking AquaMira). The sole use of this would be to clean beer glasses and nothing else. Any thoughts? Or am I basically screwed?
I would just get a bussing tray to put the glasses in and wash them upstairs after every drinking session. Certainly easier than hauling a big bucket of dirty water upstairs to dump out.
 
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beerme70

beerme70

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I would just get a bussing tray to put the glasses in and wash them upstairs after every drinking session. Certainly easier than hauling a big bucket of dirty water upstairs to dump out.
I have a basement door that goes out back, so that's not an issue. You're probably gonna ask why I don't just fill the sinks from a bucket, and I'll say I don't want to run the risk of splashing water all over the bar top.
 

Durandal

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I hate to be that guy, but in this case you really need to call a good plumber and say " Make it happen".
 

aprichman

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I have a basement door that goes out back, so that's not an issue. You're probably gonna ask why I don't just fill the sinks from a bucket, and I'll say I don't want to run the risk of splashing water all over the bar top.
Maybe setup the wash station outside? Probably would suck in the winter time though.

EDIT: Also, you could possibly fill the sink with a bottling bucket. Just run a hose from the spigot into the sink. If you have a water spigot outside it might be possible to fill the sinks by using a hose.
 

BlkWater_brewer

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I am in the process of building a small pub room in the basement. Now here's the issue. I have no real viable means of supplying water to the bar, and no way to install drainage. I have a double bin stainless kitchen sink I want to use.
The best thing to do for the sink would be to use a sump system that would connect to your existing drainage setup. They use flexible hose (like a swimming pool type) and are a breeze to hook up.

Do you own or rent should have been my first question.
As far as supplying water a simple PEX press fit Tee and some hose and again in a short time running and draining water. A plumber could do it in a couple of hours no problem if he tried to be slow. Not as hard as one would think. I put in a full kitchen and full bath in my basement (plumbing only) in a single Saturday. About $50. for the sump drain(HD) and under $40 in plumbing parts.
 
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beerme70

beerme70

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The best thing to do for the sink would be to use a sump system that would connect to your existing drainage setup. They use flexible hose (like a swimming pool type) and are a breeze to hook up.

Do you own or rent should have been my first question.
As far as supplying water a simple PEX press fit Tee and some hose and again in a short time running and draining water. A plumber could do it in a couple of hours no problem if he tried to be slow. Not as hard as one would think. I put in a full kitchen and full bath in my basement (plumbing only) in a single Saturday. About $50. for the sump drain(HD) and under $40 in plumbing parts.
I own, so that's not a problem. You brought up some good points that I hadn't considered. I'll have to price it. I just don't want to get in over my head budget-wise.
 

Natdavis777

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We put a wet bar in my dads basement pretty easily ( Though he is a carpenter of 35+ yrs and I used to be a journeyman laborer). His basement is divided, so for the sink, the drainage line runs though the wall and drains into the sump. As for the water supply, pipes are exposed on the unfinished side, so it was no issue tapping into them. Especially since the hot water heater is located down there as well. If do discover you find access to water lines down there, and dont want to worry about soldering, sharkbite fittings work really well.
 
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beerme70

beerme70

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The hot and cold lines for the kitchen are on the opposite corner of the basement related to where I want to put the bar. I could run pex across the ceiling, and possibly down the wall (I have soffits I have to work around). I have no sump, French drain, what have you in the basement, and I am not about to punch holes through the brick wall or bust up a bunch of concrete floor. If I use a sump pump, I'd be looking at about 10' of head at least, and depending on how I run a line outside, anywhere from 10 feet to up to about 30 ft horizontally. The prior owners apparently had ZERO foresight in any remote possibility of a finished basement.
 

JKoravos

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Either a plumber, or take the time to do it yourself. It's going to end up being a huge PITA having to deal with a sink that has no plumbing.
 

Renoun

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As others have mentioned it's really easy to route 1/2" pex supply lines, why do anything else. There are plenty of sanitary sump options, for example Sani-Flow makes self contained units that will easily pump against 10' of head.
 

jironarcis

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The prior owners apparently had ZERO foresight in any remote possibility of a finished basement.
 
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beerme70

beerme70

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I've decided to not mess with it. I'm just going to use the funds for maybe an addition of a beverage cooler and popcorn machine.
 
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