Looks like AAW is no longer in business - low RPM, high torque option, 3 roller Kegco?

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.

Gadjobrinus

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Aug 24, 2017
Messages
7,384
Reaction score
7,777
Location
USA
The mill will be here Monday. I went back over some older threads but to be honest, wiring my old setup was skin of the teeth then, and I ain't no younger, definitely no wiser. (though to be fair, with a massive amount of help, I was able to mount a lovejoy, reversible, variable speed setup. Beautiful. Sold it with everything else). It looks like AAW is out of business. Anyone have any suggestions for a similar motor - or full set, with connections and controller(s), just need to mount the mill and motor and zip away?
 
I appreciate it, but I'm actually keeping the mill. But thanks for the idea - maybe the Malt muncher setup can be emulated in terms of the motor. I have the lovejoys, just need a motor to drive everything.

Edit: Just saw the first listing is for the motor only. I'd actually seen the setup before but presumed it was a set (seeing the price now, I should have known). And from another thread it appears the Kegco crank shaft is very close to 15/32", basically 12 mm, so this motor should work,,
 
Last edited:
I was thinking if the price is right just toss the mill that comes with the motor and use your mill.
 
I was thinking if the price is right just toss the mill that comes with the motor and use your mill.
Crossed in the mail - it's actually just the motor.

The picture shows how the motor is connected to the mill. Mill is not included. We do not provide wiring diagrams on how to connect electricity or an on/off switch so you may need to contact an electrician to complete your project.
 
Monster sells a very similar, if not the same, motor that AAAW sold. Similar to what I recall paying as well.
Thanks, I do appreciate it. Maybe I've been out of the game too long but $350 for the motor alone is out of what I want to spend. I may just go for the HF hi-torque, low RPM drill and call it a day, though I'll keep looking on fleabay and elsewhere for a used motor.
 
The drill will work. Stay away from the small motors for the Barley Crusher and similar. I could not get one to run my 3-roller Monster. I have no regrets on the big motor myself.
 
I may just go for the HF hi-torque, low RPM drill and call it a day, though I'll keep looking on fleabay and elsewhere for a used motor.
I use an older model HF low-speed drill with similar specs to drive my MM2.
I built a baseboard for the rig, so it works like a dedicated motor. Just plug it in, nothing to hold.

Mounted Monster Mill MM2.0_1200.jpg
 
I use an older model HF low-speed drill with similar specs to drive my MM2.
I built a baseboard for the rig, so it works like a dedicated motor. Just plug it in, nothing to hold.

View attachment 845753
Excellent! To be honest, I barely made it out alive the last one - learning on the fly wiring up a potentiometer and reversibility for a non-entity technologically speaking turned my hair gray. This would be fantastic.
 
Looks like this one might fit the bill?

9.0 amps
0-900 rpm; variable speed with dial control (that's cool).
133 In-lbs.
The dial will work as well as a nylon cable tie or a strap.

You want the linear milling speed to be around 12"/second.
That puts the speed for 1.5" rollers to be around 152 rpm under full load.
For 2" diameter rollers that ideal speed would come in around 115 rpm (under full load).

Make sure the drill can deliver the required power at those (low) speeds. I know the 550 rpm HF Heavy Duty drill does, throttled to about half its max freewheel (no-load) speed.

Start the drill before filling the hopper. Once you add the grain, it will slow down quite a bit, you can hear it "chewing."
 
The dial will work as well as a nylon cable tie or a strap.

You want the linear milling speed to be around 12"/second.
That puts the speed for 1.5" rollers to be around 152 rpm under full load.
For 2" diameter rollers that ideal speed would come in around 115 rpm (under full load).

Make sure the drill can deliver the required power at those (low) speeds. I know the 550 rpm HF Heavy Duty drill does, throttled to about half its max freewheel (no-load) speed.

Start the drill before filling the hopper. Once you add the grain, it will slow down quite a bit, you can hear it "chewing."
I have to basically start over on any engineering or science aspect of anything - just forget it though it will come back when digging back in. Two questions - one, with 133 In-lbs, that should give me plenty of wiggle room under all conditions, shouldn't it? Secondly, doesn't power - if power is torque, and I'm guessing that may be erroneous - increase at slower speeds?
 
Yeah, that's the current one, replacing the one I have with similar specs.

This new (red) model runs at 600 rpm max, while mine tops out at 550 rpm. Close enough. You'd run it at around half power/speed when milling, anyway.
Then the resistance (load) from milling the grain reduces the speed drastically. That's where the maximum power is being delivered, and the most current from the power supply is drawn.

Power of the newer (red) model is also a little higher than mine, IIRC. But it never runs at full power when milling as you want the actual milling speed to roughly match what I wrote in #18.
 
Last edited:
That Genesis from HD has some pretty bad reviews - screw holding the chuck on strips or breaks after little use, chuck drops off, drill now a paperweight. No thanks. If I go the drill way (I'd still prefer to set up a dedicated, mounted station with 1/4 HP DC motor),, the HF seems like the choice. Thanks for the help all.
 
Two questions - one, with 133 In-lbs, that should give me plenty of wiggle room under all conditions, shouldn't it?
That 133 in-lbs is torque. Not sure how that's measured on drills.
But the motor can pull 7.5 Amps at 120V (900 Watts), which is very significant.

Secondly, doesn't power - if power is torque, and I'm guessing that may be erroneous - increase at slower speeds?
When a drill is freewheeling (no load) it only uses a fraction of its listed power, just enough to spin it.

When you put it under load (e.g., when drilling or milling) it starts to deliver more power, increasing the current it draws from the mains.

When the load increases the speed will drop. IIRC, that's due to the induction current it creates.
 
(I'd still prefer to set up a dedicated, mounted station with 1/4 HP DC motor)
They are nice, yes!

The drill-powered mill is a crude but fast workhorse. It mills 12-14# of malt in 3-4 minutes.

I built the milling platform after having a mishap, trying to hand-hold the drill with one hand, while keeping the small baseboard with the mill and a full hopper on top of the bucket with the other hand.
Unfortunately I bent the mill's drive shaft when the mill locked up trying to start it, tipping the whole shebang in the driveway. Twice!

I was able to re-straighten the drive shaft, then built the platform on a sunny afternoon.
Milling has been a hands-off operation since, much safer, and works like a charm!
 
They are nice, yes!

The drill-powered mill is a crude but fast workhorse. It mills 12-14# of malt in 3-4 minutes.

I built the milling platform after having a mishap, trying to hand-hold the drill with one hand, while keeping the small baseboard with the mill and a full hopper on top of the bucket with the other hand.
Unfortunately I bent the mill's drive shaft when the mill locked up trying to start it, tipping the whole shebang in the driveway. Twice!

I was able to re-straighten the drive shaft, then built the platform on a sunny afternoon.
Milling has been a hands-off operation since, much safer, and works like a charm!
Thanks for the warning! Do you have a photo of your setup?

BTw, wish I could remember whose this was....but yep, elegant.

mm pro2 with aaw motor wih white bench.JPG
 
If you have a 90 volt ~2.5A DC power supply handy that is pretty much an ideal motor...

Cheers!
Oh, good eyes man, wasn't even thinking. Given how complicated the wiring was for my original motor (potentiometer, f/w), I know this shouldn't be that big a deal but, well, I'm older, if not wiser, not sure I want to muck about with electronic wiring anymore. I'll probably keep looking. Or just say to heck with it and buy the drill from HD.
 
Ha! OK, this is nuts, but I don´t know why I didn´t think of this before.




- it´s my Retsel stone flour mill. The thing is slow, but a tank. 1/4 HP, 29:1 for 60 RPM, 200 in-pounds. Thing is, I bake - a ton. So I'd hate to break it down every time I want to switch from baking to brewing....still...it's a solid motor, ready to roll. The front comes right off - stones, front and back plates, leaving only a keyed shaft. Hmm...somehow rig up a mobile bench, with just the grist mill, aligned and ready to join portably?
 
I have almost exactly that same motor and run it with a PWM controller (also Bodine) that allows you to control the speed. It has been working fantastically for ~ 5 years. I have the advantage of being an electrical engineer, so the setup was straightforward. :)
Cool. I can't remember, not sure if I bought a Bodine controller, or rigged one up from component parts (and a lot of digging, and going over it and over it again and again, along with a reversing switch setup, before tripping "on." I've always believed it's easy to do things once - before you know you can't do the thing. Ask me about saying "sure" to building a Japanese garden complete with a ridged roof, with handtools only, by myself, in the deepest part of a brutal Providence, RI winter, tearing my rotator cuff and sucking it up without health insurance. I didn't know that was impossible, lol).

Not sure I have the gumption to try it again.
 
Cool. I can't remember, not sure if I bought a Bodine controller, or rigged one up from component parts (and a lot of digging, and going over it and over it again and again, along with a reversing switch setup, before tripping "on." I've always believed it's easy to do things once - before you know you can't do the thing. Ask me about saying "sure" to building a Japanese garden complete with a ridged roof, with handtools only, by myself, in the deepest part of a brutal Providence, RI winter, tearing my rotator cuff and sucking it up without health insurance. I didn't know that was impossible, lol).

Not sure I have the gumption to try it again.
Mine is Bodine 42A5BEPM-E2, probably the same motor with a different ratio reducer. Didn't matter to me since I used the PWM for variable speed. $49 + shipping in Jan 2017, and actually free because it was damaged in shipping due to poor packing and they refunded me.

This is the controller I got - Bodine WPM-2137E1 DC Motor Speed Control Filtered Output 115V 0791 7/16HP 0791. $50 +$15 S/H. Had to search awhile to find something that wasn't $200 like the one posted. These are like $500 new.

PM me if you want any guidance getting yours running, or I could respond here if you think there are others that could benefit from the help.
 
Mine is Bodine 42A5BEPM-E2, probably the same motor with a different ratio reducer. Didn't matter to me since I used the PWM for variable speed. $49 + shipping in Jan 2017, and actually free because it was damaged in shipping due to poor packing and they refunded me.

This is the controller I got - Bodine WPM-2137E1 DC Motor Speed Control Filtered Output 115V 0791 7/16HP 0791. $50 +$15 S/H. Had to search awhile to find something that wasn't $200 like the one posted. These are like $500 new.

PM me if you want any guidance getting yours running, or I could respond here if you think there are others that could benefit from the help.
Thanks very much! Still rolling it over and appreciate your help.
 

Latest posts

Back
Top