New England IPA Julius clone (BYO magazine)

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DrGMG

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Recipe Type
All Grain
Yeast
1318 London Ale III
Yeast Starter
Yes
Batch Size (Gallons)
5.5 gal
Original Gravity
1.065
Final Gravity
1.016
Boiling Time (Minutes)
60
IBU
100+ (300?)
Color
6
Primary Fermentation (# of Days & Temp)
14 days at 68 degrees
Tasting Notes
Close to the original.
11 lbs Pale Ale Malt (Bairds) (2.5 SRM) 81.9 %
1 lbs Oat Malt (Thomas Fawcett) (4.0 SRM) 7.4 %
5.0 oz Carapils (Briess) (1.5 SRM) 2.3 %
5.0 oz Honey Malt (25.0 SRM) 2.3 %
5.0 oz Oats, Flaked (1.0 SRM) 2.3 %

8.00 oz HopShot [10.00 %] - Boil 60.0 min
8.0 oz Turbinado [Boil for 15 min](10.0 SRM)

2.00 oz Citra [12.00 %] - Steep/Whirlpool 30.0 min
2.00 oz Mosaic (HBC 369) [12.25 %] - Steep/Whirlpool 30.0 min
1.00 oz Simcoe [13.00 %] - Steep/Whirlpool 30.0 min

2.50 oz Citra [12.00 %] - Dry Hop 4.0 Days
2.00 oz Mosaic (HBC 369) [12.25 %] - Dry Hop 4.0 Days
1.50 oz Simcoe [13.00 %] - Dry Hop 4.0 Days

Mash at 154.0 F for 60 min

The color was not as "orange" but the taste was close.
 
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DrGMG

DrGMG

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Here is mine and the original. Mine looks darker but kinda close.

Julius 10.2016.jpg


Julius can.jpg
 

gballard82

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I am about a year late on this psot but...does the brand of malt have the be the same as what is below?

11 lbs Pale Ale Malt (Bairds) (2.5 SRM) 81.9 %
1 lbs Oat Malt (Thomas Fawcett) (4.0 SRM) 7.4 %
5.0 oz Carapils (Briess) (1.5 SRM) 2.3 %

Also, what temp is the water when you sparge? and what was the gravity of the wort when you quit sparging?

Thanks!
 

HippoBrewery

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FYI Treehouse does not use flaked malts in any of their beers. Also, their house yeast is one of the main ingredients in the Treehouse flavor.
 
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DrGMG

DrGMG

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I am about a year late on this psot but...does the brand of malt have the be the same as what is below?

11 lbs Pale Ale Malt (Bairds) (2.5 SRM) 81.9 %
1 lbs Oat Malt (Thomas Fawcett) (4.0 SRM) 7.4 %
5.0 oz Carapils (Briess) (1.5 SRM) 2.3 %

Also, what temp is the water when you sparge? and what was the gravity of the wort when you quit sparging?

Thanks!
I don't think the brand is that important here.

I mashed at 154.

Regarding gravity when sparging, I do fly sparging so I collect until I have the necessary gallons for the boil.
 
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DrGMG

DrGMG

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FYI Treehouse does not use flaked malts in any of their beers. Also, their house yeast is one of the main ingredients in the Treehouse flavor.
Good to know. This recipe is from BYO magazine, and mine came out very good. Not as "juicy", maybe because of the yeast?

I'll make another NE IPA with Imperial yeast and see (I think it's also their own strain).
 

droder1

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FYI Treehouse does not use flaked malts in any of their beers. Also, their house yeast is one of the main ingredients in the Treehouse flavor.
Source?

Nate has said on twitter that flaked oats are not common but they do use them....

Hell, Curiousity One on their website clearly states flaked oats.

http://treehousebrew.com/archive/

So... do tell.
 

MilwaukeeBrewGuy

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I have never had one of these but is that really 8oz of hops shot!?!? I did not think they were that bitter.
 
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DrGMG

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I have never had one of these but is that really 8oz of hops shot!?!? I did not think they were that bitter.
Out of the 3 I've made (Sunshine, Julius, Heady Topper) this and Heady use hop shot.

Sunshine.jpg


Heady Topper clone.jpg
 

MilwaukeeBrewGuy

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Yep you are right. Even 8ml seemed like a lot to me but i haven't ran it in beersmith yet.

Are you doing closed transfers under Co2? Or can i just do the usual purge of keg with starsan and then rack into keg? I'm really worried about oxidizing an expensive batch like this. How long is the shelf life for an ipa like this?
 

gballard82

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11 lbs Pale Ale Malt (Bairds) (2.5 SRM) 81.9 %
1 lbs Oat Malt (Thomas Fawcett) (4.0 SRM) 7.4 %
5.0 oz Carapils (Briess) (1.5 SRM) 2.3 %
5.0 oz Honey Malt (25.0 SRM) 2.3 %
5.0 oz Oats, Flaked (1.0 SRM) 2.3 %

8.00 oz HopShot [10.00 %] - Boil 60.0 min
8.0 oz Turbinado [Boil for 15 min](10.0 SRM)

2.00 oz Citra [12.00 %] - Steep/Whirlpool 30.0 min
2.00 oz Mosaic (HBC 369) [12.25 %] - Steep/Whirlpool 30.0 min
1.00 oz Simcoe [13.00 %] - Steep/Whirlpool 30.0 min

2.50 oz Citra [12.00 %] - Dry Hop 4.0 Days
2.00 oz Mosaic (HBC 369) [12.25 %] - Dry Hop 4.0 Days
1.50 oz Simcoe [13.00 %] - Dry Hop 4.0 Days

Mash at 154.0 F for 60 min

The color was not as "orange" but the taste was close.
During the boil, I will add in hopshot for 60 minutes and the last 15 minutes I will add in Turbinado. My question is, how long is total boil time?

Dry hop will begin on day 10 during primary fermentation as it states you only dry hop for 4 days. Correct? Would there be any reason to begin secondary fermentation? Does anyone know if Tree House does this?

Last question is, what are some of the tips you all use to keep Primary Fermentation at 68 degrees?

Thanks all. I am a first time home brewer as I got this bad ass kit from my wife for Christmas. Cheers!!!
 

danszabrew

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During the boil, I will add in hopshot for 60 minutes and the last 15 minutes I will add in Turbinado. My question is, how long is total boil time?

Dry hop will begin on day 10 during primary fermentation as it states you only dry hop for 4 days. Correct? Would there be any reason to begin secondary fermentation? Does anyone know if Tree House does this?

Last question is, what are some of the tips you all use to keep Primary Fermentation at 68 degrees?

Thanks all. I am a first time home brewer as I got this bad ass kit from my wife for Christmas. Cheers!!!

First of all, welcome to the hobby!

To answer your questions:
A typical boil length is 60 minutes.. Basically the boil time can be adjusted if you want higher IBU or higher OG.

You can stuff more hops in a 90 minute boil than a 60 minute making your IBU higher.. if that's what you're into.

If you want a higher gravity beer you can boil longer.
Here is a pro tip: An easy way to estimate/calculate starting gravity (OG) is to measure the gravity and volume pre boil. Say your pre boil OG is 1.050 and you have 7 gallons starting volume. Multiply the gravity points by the total volume to find your total gravity points. In this case it would be 50*7. This gives you 350 total gravity points. To find the OG after boil just divide your total gravity points by your ending volume. If you end with 5.5 gallons then your starting OG will be 1.063.

This is useful if you want to make a beer that is a certain ABV%.. If you know that your boil off rate (how much vapor you lose per hour in your kettle while it is boiling) is 1 gallon per hour (a typical boil off rate) then you can find out how much you need to start with in order to get the OG that you are shooting for.

Boiling longer can also correct mash efficiency issues but you will end up with less than 5.5 gallons. I had a beer that I made recently where I was shooting for 1.080 OG and I ended up with 1.070 pre boil OG. If you do the math, ending with 5.5 gallons only gets me to 1.076. What I did was boil until I had just over 5 gallons of wort which brought me to 1.081.

To address your dry hopping question...
There is a lot of information and mixed opinions on dry hopping time, temperature, amounts, etc. There are several XBMT's on dry hopping since it is an area of brewing that isn't 100% figured out yet.
For instance.. A lot of NEIPA brewers (including major breweries) advocate dry hopping while there is still plenty of yeast activity going on. This is against the mainstream thinking of dry hopping AFTER fermentation is almost completed. I have personally dry hopped both ways; I have dry hopped for 2 days, for 4 days, for a week, etc. For a NEIPA beer such as this one you might benefit from dry hopping on say day 3 or 4.. somewhere in that range.. in order for the yeast and hops to cause "biotransformation." The best advice I can give with dry hopping is to just experiment and make the beer to YOUR preference.. that's the beauty of this hobby. You can adjust the ingredients and processes according to your preference.

As far as the fermentation question:
Last but certainly NOT least. Maintaining fermentation temperatures might be one of the most important parts of brewing beer. I brewed beer for a while without being able to control the temperature very well.. my beer wasn't very good.

There are a few choices here:
The cheapest method would probably be to place the fermenenter in a rubbermade bin with water to maintain the ambient temperature. If the temperature gets too high you just add ice to the water. If it doesn't get warm enough then some people use aquarium heaters. This method may work but won't be the optimum method. This will be cheaper but not by a lot: aquarium heater - 30-40$, rubbermade bin 10+$ which leaves you around 50$ give or take.

The only other method I would present as a new homebrewer would be to use an old refrigerator coupled with an inkbird controller and a carboy heater. The inkbird controller plugs into your power outlet and has a "heating" and a "cooling" outlet next to the temperature controller. The refrigerator would then plug into the "cooling" outlet and the carboy heater would plug into the "heating" outlet. The temperature can be set to +/- 1 degree F and if it gets below the threshold it will either turn on the refrigerator until it reaches the temperature or it will turn on the heater.

Now for the math - I got my refrigerator for 10$ on craigslist.. it doesn't have to be pretty it just has to work. The inkbird was 30$ on sale (3$ off) and the carboy heater I got on sale for 9.99. This got me to 49.99 - if you add the extra 20 for the heater not being on sale it will cost around 60$. 10$ more and you can control the temperature within 1 degree F without having to blink an eye.

:mug:
 
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gballard82

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First of all, welcome to the hobby!

To answer your questions:
A typical boil length is 60 minutes.. Basically the boil time can be adjusted if you want higher IBU or higher OG.

You can stuff more hops in a 90 minute boil than a 60 minute making your IBU higher.. if that's what you're into.

If you want a higher gravity beer you can boil longer.
Here is a pro tip: An easy way to estimate/calculate starting gravity (OG) is to measure the gravity and volume pre boil. Say your pre boil OG is 1.050 and you have 7 gallons starting volume. Multiply the gravity points by the total volume to find your total gravity points. In this case it would be 50*7. This gives you 350 total gravity points. To find the OG after boil just divide your total gravity points by your ending volume. If you end with 5.5 gallons then your starting OG will be 1.063.

This is useful if you want to make a beer that is a certain ABV%.. If you know that your boil off rate (how much vapor you lose per hour in your kettle while it is boiling) is 1 gallon per hour (a typical boil off rate) then you can find out how much you need to start with in order to get the OG that you are shooting for.

Boiling longer can also correct mash efficiency issues but you will end up with less than 5.5 gallons. I had a beer that I made recently where I was shooting for 1.080 OG and I ended up with 1.070 pre boil OG. If you do the math, ending with 5.5 gallons only gets me to 1.076. What I did was boil until I had just over 5 gallons of wort which brought me to 1.081.

To address your dry hopping question...
There is a lot of information and mixed opinions on dry hopping time, temperature, amounts, etc. There are several XBMT's on dry hopping since it is an area of brewing that isn't 100% figured out yet.
For instance.. A lot of NEIPA brewers (including major breweries) advocate dry hopping while there is still plenty of yeast activity going on. This is against the mainstream thinking of dry hopping AFTER fermentation is almost completed. I have personally dry hopped both ways; I have dry hopped for 2 days, for 4 days, for a week, etc. For a NEIPA beer such as this one you might benefit from dry hopping on say day 3 or 4.. somewhere in that range.. in order for the yeast and hops to cause "biotransformation." The best advice I can give with dry hopping is to just experiment and make the beer to YOUR preference.. that's the beauty of this hobby. You can adjust the ingredients and processes according to your preference.

As far as the fermentation question:
Last but certainly NOT least. Maintaining fermentation temperatures might be one of the most important parts of brewing beer. I brewed beer for a while without being able to control the temperature very well.. my beer wasn't very good.

There are a few choices here:
The cheapest method would probably be to place the fermenenter in a rubbermade bin with water to maintain the ambient temperature. If the temperature gets too high you just add ice to the water. If it doesn't get warm enough then some people use aquarium heaters. This method may work but won't be the optimum method. This will be cheaper but not by a lot: aquarium heater - 30-40$, rubbermade bin 10+$ which leaves you around 50$ give or take.

The only other method I would present as a new homebrewer would be to use an old refrigerator coupled with an inkbird controller and a carboy heater. The inkbird controller plugs into your power outlet and has a "heating" and a "cooling" outlet next to the temperature controller. The refrigerator would then plug into the "cooling" outlet and the carboy heater would plug into the "heating" outlet. The temperature can be set to +/- 1 degree F and if it gets below the threshold it will either turn on the refrigerator until it reaches the temperature or it will turn on the heater.

Now for the math - I got my refrigerator for 10$ on craigslist.. it doesn't have to be pretty it just has to work. The inkbird was 30$ on sale (3$ off) and the carboy heater I got on sale for 9.99. This got me to 49.99 - if you add the extra 20 for the heater not being on sale it will cost around 60$. 10$ more and you can control the temperature within 1 degree F without having to blink an eye.

:mug:
Wow! Thank you so much. Some great info here. Thanks for taking the time to be so detailed!

When it says steep/whirlpool in regards to the three different hops (30 minutes) , that is basically saying that once I kill the flame (F/O), I then add the hops and steep/whirlpool for 30 minutes before going on to the next step.
 
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danszabrew

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Wow! Thank you so much. Some great info here. Thanks for taking the time to be so detailed!

When it says steep/whirlpool in regards to the three different hops (30 minutes) , that is basically saying that once I kill the flame (F/O), I then add the hops and steep/whirlpool for 30 minutes before going on to the next step.
To answer the whirlpool question - You're 100% correct. If you have the means to "whirlpool" the wort, then go for it. This can be accomplished a few ways - with a pump or with some other way to stir the wort. If you can't stir or pump the wort just dunking the hops in a bag will work as well. You will likely lose a little bit of utilization if you're not actually stirring the wort. For years I just used a spoon to gently get the wort in a whirlpool then I added the hops. Recently I purchased a pump and this has made the process a little easier.


Looks like I missed a question from your previous post:

Dry hop will begin on day 10 during primary fermentation as it states you only dry hop for 4 days. Correct? Would there be any reason to begin secondary fermentation? Does anyone know if Tree House does this?

To answer this:
Another brewing preference topic - to use a secondary or not. For years, homebrewers were under the impression that we need to use a secondary with every batch. Let the beer ferment to near FG and then transfer to a secondary, add your dry hops and wait a week then cold crash/transfer to bottles/kegs. A lot of the "standard practices" from years ago have since been debunked - with a lot of help from the community as well as some brewers that were willing to go against the grain <-- bad pun.

In this style of beer, and any other style for that matter, you want to try to limit the amount of oxygen exposure. Transferring the beer from one vessel to another will add some exposure to oxygen. Most of us at HBT do not use a secondary at all. In my opinion I would only use a secondary if the beer you are making requires use of fruit, or other secondary additives. There is also a concern with leaving the beer on the yeast from the primary for an extended period of time. Personally, I have made a few RIS's and left them on the same yeast for 3-6 months with no off flavors. Your mileage may vary.
 
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DrGMG

DrGMG

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During the boil, I will add in hopshot for 60 minutes and the last 15 minutes I will add in Turbinado. My question is, how long is total boil time?

Dry hop will begin on day 10 during primary fermentation as it states you only dry hop for 4 days. Correct? Would there be any reason to begin secondary fermentation? Does anyone know if Tree House does this?

Last question is, what are some of the tips you all use to keep Primary Fermentation at 68 degrees?

Thanks all. I am a first time home brewer as I got this bad ass kit from my wife for Christmas. Cheers!!!

In this case, boil time is 60min.

For hazy IPAs you add the first round of dry hops in day 3 or 4 after pitching. In this case I waited for day 4 to add the dry hops, all of them, together, then rack 3 days after that. When I say "4 days" in BeerSmith it means 4 days after pitching (I may be using the software wrong probably though).

I have a chest freezer I got on black friday with a cheap temp control from Amazon. If you don't have one then get a large plastic container, half full with water and ice and keep replenishing the ice as needed.
 

danszabrew

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DrGMG - Your beers look incredible.. For as hazy as it is, it also looks really clean - if that makes sense? Did you cold crash yours at all?
 
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DrGMG

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DrGMG - Your beers look incredible.. For as hazy as it is, it also looks really clean - if that makes sense? Did you cold crash yours at all?
Thanks! I do, they use so much dry hops that the wort looks green all over. I made the mistake of tasting one before crashing and it was horrible.
 

danszabrew

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I assumed you did since your beers look so clean.. Do you think that affected the aroma at all? I haven't cold crashed a NEIPA the way that I normally do (3-5 days) but the most recent NEIPA I made I cold crashed over night. Still had a bunch of particulate in the first several pints.
 
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DrGMG

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I only crash for 24 hours since you pretty much crash in the kegerator too.
 

HippoBrewery

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Source?

Nate has said on twitter that flaked oats are not common but they do use them....

Hell, Curiousity One on their website clearly states flaked oats.

http://treehousebrew.com/archive/

So... do tell.

I was referring mostly to Julius, Nate replied to a question on Twitter about flaked grains and he said they don't use them in any of their staple beers, Julius, Haze, Green, etc...Curiosity is an experimental series so anything could be in those!
 

gballard82

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I only crash for 24 hours since you pretty much crash in the kegerator too.
Crash in the Kegerator? Does this mean it is still crashing when you rack it into a keg and wait a few days until "tapping" the keg and serving?

If so, how lond would you leave this beer in a keg before serving?
 

danszabrew

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Crash in the Kegerator? Does this mean it is still crashing when you rack it into a keg and wait a few days until "tapping" the keg and serving?

If so, how lond would you leave this beer in a keg before serving?
I think he is referring to the fact that after kegging the beer and dropping the temp you are essentially cold crashing the beer - the first several pints will be extremely hoppy - crunchy even. Cold crashing prior to kegging will give you less hops in the first few pints.
 
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DrGMG

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I think he is referring to the fact that after kegging the beer and dropping the temp you are essentially cold crashing the beer - the first several pints will be extremely hoppy - crunchy even. Cold crashing prior to kegging will give you less hops in the first few pints.
Exactly.

This is my beer before cold crashing. I actually tasted that demon juice. Crash for 24h, keg, and leave it there for a few days.

Heady Topper green.jpg
 

gballard82

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Exactly.

This is my beer before cold crashing. I actually tasted that demon juice. Crash for 24h, keg, and leave it there for a few days.
Wow! That is insane. Looks like that green smoothie everyone drinks to lose weight. LOL. I understand now.

I guess my final question is this. You have it on the recipe as;
PRIMARY FERMENTATION: 14 days at 68 degrees. Since you are cold crashing for 24 hours. Do you cold crash on the morning of the 14 day of fermentation or do you wait a full 14 days THEN cold crash for 24 hours. Essentially giving you 15 days in the carboy before racking to a keg?

Cannot believe that cold crashing for 24 hours and then kegging, waiting a few days until first glass gives it that Julius look to it. Been watching a ton of videos on cold crashing and seen a few interviews where people talk about it and why to do it. I guess it just comes down to how clear you want your beer.

I have seen some people cold crash for 24 hours, 48 and even 72. Just depends on how you like your beer I guess.

Thank you!!!

:mug:
:rockin:
 

danszabrew

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Wow! That is insane. Looks like that green smoothie everyone drinks to lose weight. LOL. I understand now.

I guess my final question is this. You have it on the recipe as;
PRIMARY FERMENTATION: 14 days at 68 degrees. Since you are cold crashing for 24 hours. Do you cold crash on the morning of the 14 day of fermentation or do you wait a full 14 days THEN cold crash for 24 hours. Essentially giving you 15 days in the carboy before racking to a keg?

Cannot believe that cold crashing for 24 hours and then kegging, waiting a few days until first glass gives it that Julius look to it. Been watching a ton of videos on cold crashing and seen a few interviews where people talk about it and why to do it. I guess it just comes down to how clear you want your beer.

I have seen some people cold crash for 24 hours, 48 and even 72. Just depends on how you like your beer I guess.

Thank you!!!

:mug:
:rockin:

You can cold crash after primary fermentation - I've had good luck with turnaround on these. If you pitch plenty of healthy yeast I've had these beers reach FG in 5-7 days. The biggest thing with fermentation is to let the yeast do it's thing.. sometimes it will go a little faster than others but you will want to make sure you have the same FG 3 days in a row before cold crashing. After you have a steady FG and the yeast has finished it is up to you if you want to cold crash right away or let the beer "condition" a little first. I have had these NEIPA's go from grain to glass in about 8 days without cold crashing. I read a lot about people saying NOT to cold crash these beers but if you don't cold crash them you will have the above shown demon juice as the first several pints. Also, if you don't cold crash and clear it up a little bit you will have a lot of hop material in the keg that can make it's way back into your glass if you move the keg at all -- I had to make some room in my keezer and I had to move my most recent NEIPA keg. The next few pours were undrinkable demon juice :mug:


To address your cold crash comment about clearing the beer - Cold crashing will drop a lot of yeast, proteins, hop material, etc from the beer leaving you with a "cleaner" beer. With a grain bill that incorporates oats or other additives that will add haze, you will notice that your NEIPA will never be completely "clear."

Some brewers seem to think that you need a ton of yeast in suspension to make your beer hazy and that is just not true. I've used WLP 007 a bunch of times for NEIPA's which is a real heavy floccer. Every non NEIPA that I have made with this yeast is incredibly clear but with the grain bill for NEIPAs such as this one you will still be left with a hazy beer.

The best advice I can give is to just keep practicing - try different yeasts, try different hops, etc. You'll find a recipe that is exactly how you want it with enough attempts
 
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DrGMG

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I only crash for 24h since I leave it in the keg carbing up for a few days and it also counts as crashing.

I use the Brewometer so when it hits my desired gravity I cold crash, this one took a while. In this case I believe it was 15 days total in carboy and 3-4 in the keg before I tried it.
 

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Just brewed this one yesterday. Didn't have any oat malt (difficult finding a vendor that carries it), so I substituted 11 oz flaked oats and 5 oz GNO. Definitely looks a bit darker than I was expecting, but the carboy can be deceptive. Used 50 IBU Warrior in lieu of hop extract, otherwise the recipe was unaltered. Managed to squeeze out 5.5G @ 1.067 OG.

Water was:
153 Ca
6 Mg
29 Na
104 SO4
199 Cl
42 HCO3
pH 5.37
 
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DrGMG

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Just brewed this one yesterday. Didn't have any oat malt (difficult finding a vendor that carries it), so I substituted 11 oz flaked oats and 5 oz GNO. Definitely looks a bit darker than I was expecting, but the carboy can be deceptive. Used 50 IBU Warrior in lieu of hop extract, otherwise the recipe was unaltered. Managed to squeeze out 5.5G @ 1.067 OG.

Water was:
153 Ca
6 Mg
29 Na
104 SO4
199 Cl
42 HCO3
pH 5.37

How did it come out?
 

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I took a shot at brewing this Thursday night on my new Mash & Boil electric kettle. I didn't have hop shot so I added extra Citra and Simcoe at the beginning boil. Also used a white labs London ale liquid yeast but fermentation didn't seem to take off so today I pitched a wyeast 1318. I'm also going to dry hop in the primary on Monday. I tasted a sample after cooling and just before pitching and it seems to have a really nice juicy taste. I'm super excited about this one!
 

specharka

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How did it come out?

Fantastic! The clone is extremely close to form and I think the water chemistry is on point as well. Head retention on this beer is simply absurd -- close to five minutes elapsed before the foam cap descended. The only reservation I have is that it's not quite bitter enough...the beer finished around 1.015 with some encouragement and the 50 IBU really doesn't do the fabulous nose justice. Think if I ever made this again I would use at least 60 IBU to balance out the malty finish.

View attachment ImageUploadedByHome Brew1490045041.742356.jpgView attachment ImageUploadedByHome Brew1490045063.275630.jpg
 

Hannabrew

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Did you start with 100% RO? If so, what additions did you make to hit those numbers? I get pretty close with gypsum and CC but sodium is low and I can't find a way to bump it up without impacting other areas
 

specharka

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Did you start with 100% RO? If so, what additions did you make to hit those numbers? I get pretty close with gypsum and CC but sodium is low and I can't find a way to bump it up without impacting other areas

My water is pretty soft but still nowhere near to RO water. If memory serves me correctly, it's somewhere around: 80 Ca, 29 Na, 3 Mg, 27 SO4, 9 Cl, 87 HCO3. My notes show I used 4.4 g CaSO4, 11.2 g CaCl2, 1.0 g MgSO4, and 3.2 mL lactic acid on 9.0 gallons of treated water. I don't think the sodium plays an impact on the overall balance of the beer, since it's there in all of my beers I've had them run the gamut in complexion. I think the most important aspect is achieving a reputable mash pH (~5.35) followed by ~200 Cl : 100 SO4.

Don't be surprised if it finishes high. The Boddington strain is a bit of a pushover.
 

Hannabrew

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Does this look about right to those that are good with Bru'n Water? I'm still getting the hang of it.

2017-03-27 23_48_29-Bru'n Water  [Compatibility Mode] - Excel.png
 

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