Interested in growing my own beer garden

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Chris N

Chris N

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My thoughts about growing a beer garden would involve planting some hardy grass variety than can handle a lot of foot traffic, pretty seasonal flowers in pots, and maybe some bigger bushes or trees, for shade, that you could also keep in pots, for convenience. You’d need a few tables, benches or chairs, and good patio umbrellas. The “beer” part of “beer garden” comes with a reliable supply of Pilsener, Weisse, or any style of your choice, preferably well chilled. Food is optional but snacks would be great!
Sounds great, I am dreaming already :)
 
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Chris N

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Was curious where I can learn about “small scale” farming? Is there a forum? It’s a new world for me and need to learn before I pursue. Planning to buy wheat seed next fall since I’ll be needing to get the soft red winter wheat not to mention will give me time to learn.
 

Andres Falconer

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My personal conclusion after reading through this thread is that, with limited space to grow, the interesting and useful thing to do is to grow your own hops, not grain. Unlike grain, you can easily grow enough hop for your brewing needs, experiment with varieties, and guarantee a supply of a fresh, highly perishable and rather expensive product that adds more personality to a beer than the grain typically does.
 
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My personal conclusion after reading through this thread is that, with limited space to grow, the interesting and useful thing to do is to grow your own hops, not grain. Unlike grain, you can easily grow enough hop for your brewing needs, experiment with varieties, and guarantee a supply of a fresh, highly perishable and rather expensive product that adds more personality to a beer than the grain typically does.
Thank you very much, Andres! I was planning to get some hops to grow, hopefully, in the spring. We have decent amount of land. I’m sure I could find a good amount of space for the grain.

I was wondering what the difference is between bottling yeast and a Hefeweizen yeast? I found out today while reading my brewing book that Franziskaner uses a bottling yeast. How are they able to say it’s Hefeweizen and have it taste like Hefeweizen but use bottling yeast?
 

Andres Falconer

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Thank you very much, Andres! I was planning to get some hops to grow, hopefully, in the spring. We have decent amount of land. I’m sure I could find a good amount of space for the grain.

I was wondering what the difference is between bottling yeast and a Hefeweizen yeast? I found out today while reading my brewing book that Franziskaner uses a bottling yeast. How are they able to say it’s Hefeweizen and have it taste like Hefeweizen but use bottling yeast?
Not the expert on this, but my understanding is that while sugar is often used for bottle conditioning, yeast is sometimes used in some traditional styles, especially for long fermentations and high ABVs, where all fermentable yeasts could have died. The bottling yeast may be a different yeast from the main (weizen) fermentation yeast, as it is meant only for carbonation, not to impart taste or other qualities.

Good luck with your project!
 
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Chris N

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Not the expert on this, but my understanding is that while sugar is often used for bottle conditioning, yeast is sometimes used in some traditional styles, especially for long fermentations and high ABVs, where all fermentable yeasts could have died. The bottling yeast may be a different yeast from the main (weizen) fermentation yeast, as it is meant only for carbonation, not to impart taste or other qualities.

Good luck with your project!
Thank you very much, Andres! Very interesting, I will for sure get the yeast the type of beer requires.
Thank you! Looking forward to starting the project. Will keep everyone updated.
 

cmac62

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If I was going to grow my own ingredients I would also see if I could get some local wild yeast to do the fermentation. I know there are threads and a article on capturing wild yeast, and then you can grow them from a single colony to isolate different strains. Maybe while you are waiting for next fall you can learn the yeast wrangling required to truly grow your own culture. Of course learning to make quality beer with store bought ingredients may be a good starting place. Just a thought. Good luck with your project. :mug:
 
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If I was going to grow my own ingredients I would also see if I could get some local wild yeast to do the fermentation. I know there are threads and a article on capturing wild yeast, and then you can grow them from a single colony to isolate different strains. Maybe while you are waiting for next fall you can learn the yeast wrangling required to truly grow your own culture. Of course learning to make quality beer with store bought ingredients may be a good starting place. Just a thought. Good luck with your project. :mug:
Thank you very much, Cmac62! Great ideas. Though different wild yeast will change the flavor won’t it? I’m not sure I want to go that far unless I had too. Was thinking about getting the yeast in the recipe and culturing that. Though that’s a really cool idea. Looking forward to getting things started, will share updates. Merry Christmas everyone!
 
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