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Home Brew vs Hand Pulled Pint

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Ramsbottom_Brewer

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My 1st batch is not finished yet but I am interested in knowing how the ale gets out of the keg at my local pub. They pull it out with the pump and it is as smooth as a babies bum. Through all my reading here it seems we need CO2 to push out our ale.

What's going on?
 

carnevoodoo

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That's what you call real ale. Are you in England?

Real ale comes from a cask, which is naturally carbonated. It doesn't stay fresh very long like that, but a good cask is a treat.
 

TwoHeadsBrewing

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Sounds like a cask-conditioned ale. Basically, they carbonate using priming sugar right in the keg/cask. Same principal as bottle conditioning. The cask-conditioned ales I've tried all seem to have a bit less carbonation than a force carbed keg. Not sure why, but I would agree that the cask ales come out super smooth!
 

SumnerH

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My 1st batch is not finished yet but I am interested in knowing how the ale gets out of the keg at my local pub. They pull it out with the pump and it is as smooth as a babies bum. Through all my reading here it seems we need CO2 to push out our ale.

You want cask-conditioned real ale. Thread on building beer engines:
https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/fellow-homebrewers-meet-my-new-beer-engine-10529/

Some people successfully use gravity-fed minikegs for real ale, too.
 

JPicasso

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Can one get the same effect with ales with a nitrogen or Guinness tap?
A hand pump might not be practical for a homebrewer who doesn't drink 5 gallons in a week, but you're essentially mixing the beer with air on the way out, right?

Seems like this would produce the same effect one gets with a can of Boddington's Ale.
 

remilard

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You certainly get a similar effect with the Guinness approach. That method of serving was developed as a cheaper/simpler alternative to real ale.
 
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