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Help with wiring 10000W 220v Adjust SCR Voltage Regulator

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Brando_i

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I think there's a number of us that find this route interesting. I will be collecting the parts needed this week. Can someone help with an electrical diagram to include one of these regulators as well as a "main" push button on off and a secondary on/off controlling a standard outlet for a pump?

 

aquenne

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What is the ampherage rating on that thing?
Those terminals look pretty small to me.
 

alien

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Presumably 40W or so. Yes I reckon the terminals are what might limit the current on these things. These modules are physically quite large. The triac is rated at 100A, the heat sink is huge, and the traces on the back are pretty chunky.
 

aquenne

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My suggestion would be to look into a SSR instead of this.

There is no way that thing is capable of safely switching 10,000 watts.
Current=Power/Voltage = 10,000 watt/240V = 41.6A.

For that kind of ampherage depending on the distance you are looking at 8-6GA wire. Those terminals look like they are rated for a few amps, and 16GA wire.
 

jCOSbrew

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You can get a phase angle ssr and heat sink for about $12. It uses a pot to control power to the load. Search for voltage resistance ssr on eBay or amazon.
Even a simple design should use a 30amp switch or contactor to disable both AC phases to turn off the element.
 
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Brando_i

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My suggestion would be to look into a SSR instead of this.

There is no way that thing is capable of safely switching 10,000 watts.
Current=Power/Voltage = 10,000 watt/240V = 41.6A.

For that kind of ampherage depending on the distance you are looking at 8-6GA wire. Those terminals look like they are rated for a few amps, and 16GA wire.

There are several examples of these being used. There is even a company selling pre-made control boxes with these. I'm really not worried about it handling the amperage.
 

alien

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My suggestion would be to look into a SSR instead of this.

There is no way that thing is capable of safely switching 10,000 watts.
Current=Power/Voltage = 10,000 watt/240V = 41.6A.

For that kind of ampherage depending on the distance you are looking at 8-6GA wire. Those terminals look like they are rated for a few amps, and 16GA wire.
The terminals are a weak link, but they are not tiny. To get a sense of the scale of these modules, here is one next to a 3800W power regulator, also from ebay, and a 12V computer fan.



I would probably not run one of these at 10 kW but I know from other people's reports that it is more than adequate to handle a 5500W element.
 

audger

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here is one next to a 3800W power regulator, also from ebay, and a 12V computer fan.
I was going to also suggest excercising caution, but then i read "Ebay" and I realized that ebay only sells the most technically sound and highest quality products ever made in that chineese guys' unfinished basement in the suburbs of Guandong, China. You can always trust your life to an electrical spec listed in an Ebay auction.

so... carry on, folks.

(if you want any actual advice, list the part number of that triac[?] so that we can look up the datasheet and KNOW how much its capable of handling, instead of just spectating based on an ebay auction listing)
 

ProjectOrion

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So what would the diagram look like for this thing, as OP was asking? I'm looking at using the 10kw model with a 5.5kw element in a pure 240v environment (would be fine not breaking off a leg for 120 equipment).

I see it has two AC ins/outs, so I assume you bring in one leg of the 240 w/ neutral, then that hot line out to the element, but what do you do with that neutral? And seeing as in this configuration you'd always have one leg being hot (the one not going through the SCR), what's the simplest way to to have a complete kill switch as OP was asking about too? Could I have a simple dpst that breaks both legs before the SCR? Or have to wire in a contactor...

Sorry for the barrage of questions; I just don't see this type of setup too often on here (quite a few over on the distillation boards, but only the single 3800w rail) but this really looks to be all I'd want. (Of course I'd back this up with a gfci either with a spa panel or at the breaker)
 

stlbeer

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If you are using 240v then you do not use a neutral. However, you do use a ground wire. 240v is two 120v legs. I'd assume you would attach both 120v legs to the IN and both outgoing 120v legs from the OUT to the element.

This is an assumption. Proceed at your own risk.
 
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