Fermenting in a corny keg?

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dsdunbar

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@McKnuckle @moreb33rplz
Follow up question: I have finally setup the corny kegs as primary fermentors and am using a spunding valve. I brewed a pale ale on 4/10/2021 and have active fermentation going on (the pressure is higher than when started). The question is, the spunding valve is releasing the gasses as it exceeds the set pressure (which is around 12psi), do I need to be pushing that CO2 into a starsan solution blowoff setup? I think the spunding valve protects me from sucking air back into the keg (plus it should always have a positive pressure on the inside of the keg, so no back suction). When I open my converted fridge to fermentation chamber door I can get a pleasent smell of the off gassing. Does this seem like an acceptable way forward (to let it vent to the interior of the chamber)? I know I could try to capture the CO2, but my space is really limited to put in another vessel. See pictures.

Bit more information:
Hi All, So I appreciate the guidance you all provided for my questions back in Nov of 2020. I brewed my first 10 gal batch in January and decided to stick to the fermenting buckets for that batch (minimize the amount of new things, brewing AG fr the first time was enough newness). Fast forward to April 10 2021 and my friend and I just brewed a pale ale, and I am attempting the corny keg fermentation.

I am using three kegs for the batch size was 13 gallons, so roughly have the following volumes for 3 kegs: 4.5, 4.5, and 3 gallons.

I used my CFC to get the temp down to 70F in each vessel and then pitched my yeast, and closed the kegs up, hit it with CO2 and bled the air out through the Pressure relief valve. I put 12 psi of CO2 in each keg, attached a blowtie spunding valve, and have the kegs stored in a fridge converted to fermentation chamber with temp set to 70F.

After 24 hours it is apparent that the yeast is doing its thing, the pressure climbed in each vessel (I have had to manually adjusted the spunding valves to try and keep the pressure close to 12 psi, for the pressure had risen to 18psi in two of the kegs, the third I suspect had a slow leak so I took care of that and it rose to 15 psi).

So here are pictures, I didnt take any pictures of the corny kegs interior (with the fine mesh Hop cylinder as a filter around the pick up tubes, but it looks the same as McKnuckle showed in his pics (for I copied based on his pics).
 

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VirginiaHops1

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Follow up question: I have finally setup the corny kegs as primary fermentors and am using a spunding valve. I brewed a pale ale on 4/10/2021 and have active fermentation going on (the pressure is higher than when started). The question is, the spunding valve is releasing the gasses as it exceeds the set pressure (which is around 12psi), do I need to be pushing that CO2 into a starsan solution blowoff setup? I think the spunding valve protects me from sucking air back into the keg (plus it should always have a positive pressure on the inside of the keg, so no back suction). When I open my converted fridge to fermentation chamber door I can get a pleasent smell of the off gassing. Does this seem like an acceptable way forward (to let it vent to the interior of the chamber)? I know I could try to capture the CO2, but my space is really limited to put in another vessel. See pictures.
Spunding valves are sealed and can only release pressure. No air entering backwards. I generally let my keg fermentations go for a couple days in the blow off jar then put the spunding valve on inside my fermentation fridge
 

dsdunbar

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Spunding valves are sealed and can only release pressure. No air entering backwards. I generally let my keg fermentations go for a couple days in the blow off jar then put the spunding valve on inside my fermentation fridge
Thanks, I've done a bit of reading of doing primary fermentation under pressure (like 12psi), I decided to take that route, I know for some styles it is not advised but my understanding is for hoppy beers it helps with minimizing esters. Is there a reason you do not ferment underpressure to start? Just curious for this is all very new...
 

VirginiaHops1

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Thanks, I've done a bit of reading of doing primary fermentation under pressure (like 12psi), I decided to take that route, I know for some styles it is not advised but my understanding is for hoppy beers it helps with minimizing esters. Is there a reason you do not ferment underpressure to start? Just curious for this is all very new...
I do primarily all hoppy beers and select my yeast based on the characteristics I want in that beer and ferment them within their optimum temp ranges. So I don't really feel the need to suppress anything. I guess if you're fermenting warmer than usual and you may get undesirable esters or something I could see it. I've heard of people fermenting lagers under pressure so they could go warmer without off-flavors. If it works for you though have at it
 
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