Deionized water

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hamburgeler

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I just received a hach pH meter in the mail, but don't have deionized water. Should I try to find some or is distilled water OK to rinse the probe with? Is there anywhere I can buy it?

Thanks.

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ajdelange

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Distilled should be good enough but often 'distilled' is, in fact, RO (check the label). That's the case for the 'distilled' water sold in drugstores in Quebec. That's what I use when up there and there is no reason it shouldn't be more than adequate for rinsing. If you do happen across some really DI water, though, grab it.
 

TheZymurgist

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Distilled should be good enough but often 'distilled' is, in fact, RO (check the label). That's the case for the 'distilled' water sold in drugstores in Quebec. That's what I use when up there and there is no reason it shouldn't be more than adequate for rinsing. If you do happen across some really DI water, though, grab it.
Just a quick point, "DI" refers to de-ionized, not distilled. So if you see RO/DI water, that's reverse osmosis/de-ionized water. Just trying to avoid confusion...
 

ajdelange

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DI means 'deionized' by whatever means have been used be they ion exchange, distillation or a combination of those with other techniques such as RO and microfiltration. 'Deionized' does not speak to how completely the ions have been removed. Ultrapure water is pretty much totally devoid of anything other than H+ and OH- ions and exhibits resistivity of 18 MΩ-cm. This is the only truly deionized water. But RO water at 1 ppm TDS can also be considered 'DI' as it has been, for the most part, de-ionized.

Most 'DI' water in today's world comes from ion exchange after RO. Sometimes this is referred to as RO/DI, especially in this forum where guys have the option to buy an RO system by itself or the same system with an exchange cartridge in series with the output. Multiple distillations are required to obtain water of high purity and steps must be taken to remove things other than ions (such as dissolved gasses and organics). Ion exchange is much more practical in most cases.
 
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