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Creating a Really Malty, Smooth Brew

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cmdrico7812

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Can someone help me put together a really malty beer. I love hops and I'm a huge fan of IPAs, but I want to make a beer that's really malty and smooth without a lot of bitterness. Any thoughts on what style would be a good start? Ordinary Bitter? I usually do a partial mash so I have the capability to mash a good amount of grain (up to 6 lbs probably). I also have about 22 lbs. of amber LME on hand. I just don't know what grains to use, and how much, to get a really, really malty smooth beer. Thanks for your help!

Eric
 

GreenwoodRover

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Try a scottish ale...
For me I feel crystal malts (esprcially 60L and higher) and belgian aromatic help add a lot of malt flavor. Also try a yeast that isn't too drying like s-04.
 

Whisler85

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try an american brown or american amber- the recipes found in brewing classic styles should give you pretty tasty, malty brews
 

GunnerMan

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Try an Irish red, Irish Ale, or a Scottish Ale, all or known for low hop bitterness/flavor and high maltiness. Usually combined with a medium to low attenuating yeast to keep the FG up A bit.

I can say I prefer malt to hop(but I like hops) and I brew an irish style brew 85% of the time.
 

jpsloan

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I would take a look at BierMuncher's OktoberFast Ale recipe. I brewed it last August. It was balanced, but the grains really shine in that beer, on the palate as well as the nose.
 

snailsongs

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I'll put my vote in for a southern english brown ale or nut brown ale.....these are usually only hopped with a minimal bittering addition and are malty, slightly sweet and very flavorful. Most recipes use as much or more specialty grains as a stronger stout or porter, but without the roastiness. A beer for the malt inclined, if you ask me.

EDIT: I've got a great recipe that I've made twice now (if you're interested i can post here), or else look for Orfy's Hobgoblin clone....I believe that's another english style brown that seems popular around here.
 

Clonefarmer

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Scotch ale was my first thought but scrolling down I see Oktoberfest. Both are very malty styles. Scotch usually being the sweeter of the two.

I brewed an ordinary bitter from a partial mash kit and it had very little malt or sweet flavor. Although this may be due to the recipe.
 

snailsongs

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English bitters tend to have a malt element, but overall they strive for an even balance between malt and hops.
 
OP
C

cmdrico7812

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I'll put my vote in for a southern english brown ale or nut brown ale.....these are usually only hopped with a minimal bittering addition and are malty, slightly sweet and very flavorful. Most recipes use as much or more specialty grains as a stronger stout or porter, but without the roastiness. A beer for the malt inclined, if you ask me.

EDIT: I've got a great recipe that I've made twice now (if you're interested i can post here), or else look for Orfy's Hobgoblin clone....I believe that's another english style brown that seems popular around here.
Go ahead and post the recipe you have. I've like to see it and see if I can make it with ingredients I have on hand. I've made Orfy's Hobgoblin Clone before (Hobgoblin is my all time favorite beer), and I'm going to try it again soon. I've just been a big malty kick recently.

Thanks to everyone else for your thoughts. I'll put together a southern brown ale and see how that works. Thanks
 
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