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Corny kegs

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awillis

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I really need some reading material on corny kegs and the parts that come with. I dont want to purchase a complete unit then find my parts are wrong. I have a working fridge I can use as a kegerator so thats not a problem. If I could get steered in the right direction with some links or books that would be awesome. Dont be bashful to provide a very detailed post either. I need help! TIA.
 

Janx

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One of the best things you can do is go to your LHBS and take a look at the fittings and stuff. It's all really straightforward and more easy to show than tell if you see what I mean.

Cheers! :D
 
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awillis

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kkroger--
I owe you big time! Kegging 101 is exactly what I needed. If you ever venture out to Fort Collins, CO, the brews are on me, thank you very much.
 

kkroger

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No worries man! I am new to this stuff too I have looked up everything I can find happy to share! I would definitely go with Ball Lock and try to get the refurbished kegs I would hate to try to scrub the syrup out of some of em!
I bought Refurbs from Sabco and got a refurb with my kegging kit just make sure you get the same fittings on all your kegs!

May take you up on that Brew offer one day! I just finished Chemo therapy today and am on the road to recovery but it seems that it is a long row to hoe! but I plan to win and will have time to brew my own for years to come...
 

bikebryan

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kkroger said:
This is a good site, although I strongly disagree with the observations on the Cobra tap. He argues that it is useless when trying to dispense at serviing pressures (like 12PSI) unless you want glasses of foam. It is also implied that the amount of tubing needed to add the proper balance on the picnic tap is excessive.

At 12PSI, using regular beverage tubing (3/8" ID, IIRC), you have a resistance of about 2psi/ft, meaning you need around 6 to 8 feet of beverage line between the keg and the cobra tap to balance the pressure and avoid glasses of foam. This is not a lot of tubing, and tens of thousands of us have setups just like this with ZERO problems.
 

Born Brewing Co.

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kkroger said:
May take you up on that Brew offer one day! I just finished Chemo therapy today and am on the road to recovery but it seems that it is a long row to hoe! but I plan to win and will have time to brew my own for years to come...

LIVESTRONG!!
 

Gilbey

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What's a good price for a used corny keg?

Is it worth buying them cleaned and refurbished or not?

Thanks!

Gilbey
 

Janx

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awillis said:
Is a five pound co2 tank sufficient for only a 2.5 gal corny keg?
You can push a lot of kegs with a 5 pound CO2 tank. Not sure exactly how many because it all varies, but a lot.

I have a 15 or 20 pound tank and it seems like I fill it a couple times a year at most. It pushes two kegs most every day.

Cheers :D
 
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awillis

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My kegging system is finally on its way. Cant wait! I was wondering on how to force carbonate without providing the chilled brew with oxygen. I'm thinking I can fill the keg to its max(below some hole, dont know which one) and let chill for a couple days in the fridge. While it chills is when I can bleed the pressure that is created in the keg. Once this pressure is mostly relieved is when I should provide plenty of co2(20-30psi) and shake. After this let sit for perhaps a few more days, then lower the psi to 12 and enjoy. Is this idea on the right track and if not where did I go wrong? TIA
 

bikebryan

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awillis said:
My kegging system is finally on its way. Cant wait! I was wondering on how to force carbonate without providing the chilled brew with oxygen. I'm thinking I can fill the keg to its max(below some hole, dont know which one) and let chill for a couple days in the fridge. While it chills is when I can bleed the pressure that is created in the keg. Once this pressure is mostly relieved is when I should provide plenty of co2(20-30psi) and shake. After this let sit for perhaps a few more days, then lower the psi to 12 and enjoy. Is this idea on the right track and if not where did I go wrong? TIA
Best bet:

1. Rack beer to keg.

2. Place lid on keg and close it

3. Open pressure release valve, then connect your CO2 and open the line. The CO2, being heavier than air, will sink down to your beer surface and force the room air out of your tank through the pressure release valve. Let the CO2 run for about 30 seconds or so, and you'll have the bad air out of that keg. Close the pressure release valve.

4. Set your desired serving pressure, based on the carbonation level you want to achieve (consult the charts for this).

5. Wait about a week.

By following this regimen, you'll end up with consistently carbonated beer, at exactly the carbonation level you were seeking, without the worries of oxidation. The crank-and-shake method you described will carbonate, sure, and lots faster, but usually results in under- or over-carbonated beer. Just be patient. Homebrewing is not for the impatient.
 
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