Quantcast

Confusion from HBS

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

unionrdr

Homebrewer, author & air gun collector
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2011
Messages
39,161
Reaction score
3,782
Location
Sheffield
I'm not really into big,heavy drink one & fall over beers myself. But I did come up with a recipe for the old #3 Burton ale from the 1890's that sounded good. Came out real well at 6.8%. Def strong ale territory. You basically use a lot more malt (grains,extracts,etc) to get a high OG,like 1.070+ roughly. Your FG will be correspondingly higher as well. Look in the recipe section for some examples of high gravity ales.
 

unionrdr

Homebrewer, author & air gun collector
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2011
Messages
39,161
Reaction score
3,782
Location
Sheffield
Glad you have come around to agreeing with me. :mug:

Although it doesn't sound like you have had enough experience with high gravity beers (above 10% or so) to have really noticed a pattern.
I've brewed enough beer to notice different patterns in aromas,flavor complexities, brewing processes vs results...that sort of thing. I have one big beer recipe from the 1890's that I like. I'm not real big on high gravity,high alcohol beers for the sake of big alcohol,or bragging rights. I also don't have a pedestal to be knocked off of,which is the vibe I've been getting. I just made my opinions on that long conditioning time that I've found to be otherwise. That's all...:mug:
 
OP
S

Starrider

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2012
Messages
79
Reaction score
9
Location
Grass Lake
That's what I love about this forum. It would take me years to gain that kind of knowledge and experience but here I get to ask you "experts" how it is done and save some time.
I'm not real big on high gravity beers either and high alcohol would only be for the bragging right to say that I made one. I am looking into smaller bottles or kegging because I am finding 16 and 20oz bottle to be too big. I will generally only have one beer in the evening and 20 oz is more like two. With 12 oz bottles, I always have the option of having another if I want. Kegging would give me ulitmate flexibility but also a greater investiment in equipment. Maybe farther down the road.
Is it possible to re-use twist off bottles? I have a capper and plenty of caps, just not sure if they would hold sufficiently. I was eye-balling some 8oz coke bottles to reuse for beer but they had twist off caps. Extra work for such small bottles but could be a good suppliment for the larger bottles.
 

unionrdr

Homebrewer, author & air gun collector
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2011
Messages
39,161
Reaction score
3,782
Location
Sheffield
Twist offs are hit-n-miss on sealing. Plus the glass is thinner. And I liked the blue bud light platinum bottles till I found they were twisties.
And humpsalot,I like a phylosophical argument once in a while. :mug:
 

Sir Humpsalot

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Nov 26, 2006
Messages
3,996
Reaction score
93
unionrdr said:
I also don't have a pedestal to be knocked off of,which is the vibe I've been getting.
Not trying to knock you down. You are right that you can drink a 5% beer sooner than 8 weeks, and many may even peak a little sooner than that (probably not by much unless it's hop-bursted or a hefeweizen). But I am saying that having brewed several beers at every percentage between 3% and 12%, with some as low as 2% and others as high as 18%, certain trends and generalities start to become pretty clear. Bigger beer = Longer aging. As a general rule, 1 month per ABV over 3 works pretty well. I think it is the closest anyone will come to a simple across the board rule.

But if all you brew is in the 5-6% range, you will never see how that rule applies. To use another analogy, you are brewing in a narrow range, so you are kinda like missing the forest amongst the trees...

I understand why people think most beers should be around 5-6% but I really encourage brewers to go beyond that in both directions. My house hefeweizen is 3.8%ABV. It is drinkable in 2-3 weeks. And next year I might bring it down to 3.6%. As homebrewers we have almost complete flexibility. It is a shame to limit yourself to a narrow range... And I am not suggesting that you necessarily must go higher.
 
OP
S

Starrider

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2012
Messages
79
Reaction score
9
Location
Grass Lake
I bought my fixins for the next batch. It is a Muntons Canadian Style Ale kit and I also got some DME. I am seriously thinking about splitting the kit so I can make part of it with the DME and the other part with sugar. The kit says to use sugar but all the recommendations I have seen say to use malt or corn sugar. I figure in order to really understand what the difference is, I need to make it both ways at the same time so they ferment under the same conditions and for the same amount of time etc. Then I can do a side by side taste test and see what difference the DME makes.
My plan is to use my MR. Beer keg and do 2 gal with sugar and the 4 gal balance with DME. I just have to figure out how to accurately divide the LME from the kit and the yeast. I think my scale should work fine for the LME and DME just not sure yet on how to do the yeast. My scale is not accurate enough for the yeast so will probably have to use some small measuring spoons or the like. Planning to batch them up after work tonight.
 

unionrdr

Homebrewer, author & air gun collector
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2011
Messages
39,161
Reaction score
3,782
Location
Sheffield
It might be easier to divide it into two 3 gallon batches. Easier to split the extract,etc that way. Otherwise,with 3x2=6,two thirds for the 4G batch,1/3 for the 2 gallon should be pretty close at least.
And I've just been caught up in experimenting with two different yeasts & various hops in my APA/PA's to see which I like best. I've had some below 5%,another nearly 7%. Yes,it sounds like a narrow range,but some of the dark or higher gravity beers take some extra time to condition. The two months from BK to glass suits me just fine. Beers that take a year or more reminf me of my wine making days. I got tired of having to wait at least a year for the wines to condition to where they were ready to drink.
 
OP
S

Starrider

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2012
Messages
79
Reaction score
9
Location
Grass Lake
It would definitely be easier to cut in half but I only have one ale pail and a mr. Beer fermenter which is only 2 gallons. That is why the funny ratio.
 

MarcusKillion

Banned
Joined
Mar 5, 2012
Messages
1,207
Reaction score
82
Location
Wichita
that kit makes 6 gallons 23 liters . It also sucks bad . first mistake was picking up that can . Let it sit in bottle for a few months to make it taste better.
Never use 2.2 pounds of sugar . It thins the beer out but does add in ABV . Use DME or LME I use DME and use 1 pound corn sugar if I want to bump up ABV a bit more . I use dark since it adds a bit more flavor .

Okay I love these kits . Just pour the can in a fermenting bucket . Boil about 3 3/4 quarts of water . pour the water in the bucket and stir up the stuff. Then pour in cold water to get 6 gallons and you will be right at your SG . cool it down to 70 degrees and dump in yeast , rehydrate first . cap it and air lock it and wait one week and bottle it and wait for two months if you want it to taste better.
If you make a wort then use that for the boiling water .
 

MarcusKillion

Banned
Joined
Mar 5, 2012
Messages
1,207
Reaction score
82
Location
Wichita
1 week primary then bottle with a can & kilo kit? Never had one hit Fg & settle out clear that fast.
not saying you can not wait longer but I think it does not matter much . Sometimes I wait 2 weeks just to let things settle out if I used grains . Only difference I can see is you may get a bit more trub in the bottom of your bottle depending on the type of beer . the no boil kits do not have much of this problem as they have already been settled out . How ever the trub is very thin and will mix up in your beer if you disturb it much by moving the bucket around roughly or sticking in your siphon tube too far . " Siphon carefully " . I have bottled beers after 4 days several times .
I do usually wait 3 weeks for carbonation to test and then a month more for conditioning to make them taste real good unless they just taste good already .
I do condition my bottles in the same room and temp , usually about 72 degrees for 3 weeks and then move them to a cooler room or sometimes warmer and then back .
 

unionrdr

Homebrewer, author & air gun collector
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2011
Messages
39,161
Reaction score
3,782
Location
Sheffield
I leave the boxed bottles in the warmest room in the house. I let my beers settle out clear or slightly misty in primary. I have spigots on both FV's,& the trub level is always below that & compacted well.
I get clear beer into the bottling bucket. Thus very little trub in the bottles. It's easier to pour off more beer that way.
 

MarcusKillion

Banned
Joined
Mar 5, 2012
Messages
1,207
Reaction score
82
Location
Wichita
I tend to get a bit more trub sometimes because I use two packs of yeast. I also have one primary bucket with a spigot and a couple 5 gallon with spigot . I do not use secondary much .
I am brewing some muntons pilsner and canadian . I am going to leave the pilsner in primary two weeks and the Canadian I will put one gallon in a gallon jug and dry hop in a bit of fuggles and the rest of 5 gallons I will put in secondary and dry hop in cascade or saaz .

Oh , my fermentation room is usually 72 to 74 degrees so I get fast fermentations but probably would not be good for some beers like the pilsner or canadian which I have been trying to keep at 70 or less . But usually I do dark ales like nut brown so it really does not make any difference . Sometimes I bottle in 4 days .
 
Top