CO2 Fire Extinguisher for kegging?

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funkapottomous

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Okay, I've got all my kegging supplies, except for the CO2 tank. I asked my Dad if he might be able to snag me a tank from the plant where he works, and apparently the only thing that they've even got out there that's not a GIANT tank are a bunch of CO2 fire extinguishers.

I know that the fire extinguisher has got a nozzle and trigger and whatnot on it, but has anyone used one/figured out how to use one for kegging?

Is it possible?

I'm broke at the moment so if I can snag a big CO2 tank for free (fire extinguisher) that'd be awesome.

a google search turned up ONE thread here on HBT, and there were about two or three posts- none of them helpful.
 
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funkapottomous

funkapottomous

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According to this site: http://www.truetex.com/carbonation.htm you can use an extinguisher tank, but it was a bit vague as to what type of tank to look for:

"Another source of gas is CO2 fire extinguishers, which are made typically from a 20 lb tank, except painted red and fitted with an extinguisher squeeze-valve and horn. . . . I have . . . adapted the high-side of my regulator to connect to the extinguisher valve. When empty, the gas dealer can then remove the squeeze-valve and extinguisher horn and install a standard twist valve top on the tank. Tanks should also be inspected internally and subjected to a hydrostatic pressure test after some years, so if you are not swapping tanks to refill, you should make sure your dealer is inspecting the tanks on the right schedule."

I guess it all depends on what the filler in my area is willing to work with.

Upon further inspection, I found this little morsel in the attached link:

Another source of gas is CO2 fire extinguishers, which are made typically from a 20 lb tank, except painted red and fitted with an extinguisher squeeze-valve and horn. On several occasions I have bought these extinguishers at plant-closing auctions for $1 each, and adapted the high-side of my regulator to connect to the extinguisher valve. When empty, the gas dealer can then remove the squeeze-valve and extinguisher horn and install a standard twist valve top on the tank. Tanks should also be inspected internally and subjected to a hydrostatic pressure test after some years, so if you are not swapping tanks to refill, you should make sure your dealer is inspecting the tanks on the right schedule.
so now I just gotta figure out how to regulate from a fire extinguisher.
 
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