Bubbles stopped after 6 hours

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djsereno91

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I know, I know. I shouldn't be judging my fermentation based on the bubbles, but this seemed especially peculiar to me.

Just to catch you up... I'm brewing a Belgian Tripel extract recipe from MoreBeer and everything went really smoothly (this is my third batch). I made a 2L starter (decanted the starter wort). Pitched the yeast and set to 65 degrees. Slowly upping the temp to 75 degrees over the span of a week.

My airlock was bubbling (not too crazy, less than a bubble per second) roughly 12 hours after I pitched the wort. I checked on it roughly 6-8 hours later and there were no bubbles at all. It's been 48 hours now and still nothing. I've swirled the carboy hoping to reactivate but still nothing.

I know it's not uncommon for it to take up to 3 days to start fermenting, or for fermenting to finish within a day or two, but less than 6 hours seems funny. I haven't been able to find anyone with similar experiences online. I haven't taken another gravity reading yet. I was planning on waiting one more day to see if it starts back up.

I guess I'm just wondering if this is not uncommon or if I need to take action. Can anyone offer some wise words?
 

Iseneye

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You shouldn't be judging fermentation based on the bubbles.....:)

Unlikely to have finished fermenting in 6 hours since it is a high gravity beer. Take a gravity sample and test it with a hydrometer. You will likely find that it hasn't reached terminal gravity.
 
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djsereno91

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The only way I aerated it was sloshing it around once I transferred to the primary. I think I'm just going to wait a week like Mandinga suggests. Do I have anything to lose if I find out that the gravity is still really high in week as opposed to right now?
 

Sammy86

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The only way I aerated it was sloshing it around once I transferred to the primary. I think I'm just going to wait a week like Mandinga suggests. Do I have anything to lose if I find out that the gravity is still really high in week as opposed to right now?
The biggest piece of advice that I have been given by experienced Brewers is that patience is a virtue. Let the beer sit for 7-10'days...I generally don't open the bucket until day 14...take a gravity reading and go from there.

The only thing you have to lose is that beautiful CO2 blanket that has been created by the yeast eating all that delicious sugar. IMHO, let it sit a while longer and then check your gravity.

:mug:
 
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djsereno91

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Good points. Thanks for all the input everybody, I'll keep you updated
 

Likefully

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Its possible that the krausen is blocking the gas from escaping. Is there a lot of krausen?

I am also quite interested to know what risk there is of giving the fermenter a dam good shake or 6 at this stage...
 

unionrdr

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Big beers do seem to need a lot of aeration. I've got a big Burton to brew up, & I'm thing of an airstone/o2 bottle combo to get it to the right aeration level.
 
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djsereno91

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Well, I came home today from work and it seems to have gone crazy! I think you might have been on to something Likefully. You can see there's a ton of krausen. That's the surface level just below the "Big Mouth Bubbler" logo. View attachment ImageUploadedByHome Brew1440553409.262895.jpg

My blowoff container used to be clear. Looks like a lot has gone through the tube. View attachment ImageUploadedByHome Brew1440553517.191912.jpg

Should I attempt to clean out the tube or the blowoff container? My gut tells me to just leave it alone until it's time to bottle.
 
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djsereno91

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I think all is well. I've just left it alone, slowly raising the temp. Since I have such a long piece of blowoff tubing, it kind of sags and creates a low point. I think the carbon dioxide is settling at that low point which is why I don't see bubbles too often. Once enough pressure builds up to push it out, then it will bubble. Or if I pick up the tube, a bunch of bubbles will pour out (carbon dioxide is heavier than I realized). Regardless, it seems to be doing its thing!

I probably won't take a gravity reading until a few days before I gelatin fine. I'll let you guys know how it is then
 
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