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Best yeast for dark fruit flavors in high gravity Belgium style beer ?

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brewman !

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I want to brew a high gravity (1.100+) Belgium style beer. I am looking for a dry yeast that will accentuate dark fruit flavors - raisin, plum, maybe a bit of pear or apple. Not looking for spice or bananas.

Suggestions ?

Safale BE 256 ?
Mangrove Jack M31 ? Or M47 ?
Lalbrew Abbaye Belgium Ale Yeast. "At lower temperatures, LalBrew® Abbaye produces darker fruit aromas and flavors of raisin, date, and fig:
 
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brewman !

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Here's something I don't understand. 2 guys brewed 2 different beers and used M31. Beer1 was "nice banana , clove, maybe some bubblegum" Beer2 was "Very complex. Malty with tons of plum, raisin and pear. Maybe a little clove". Doesn't even sound like the same yeast !

Beer1 OG 1.090, finished at 1.000. Mashed at 149 Ferment at 64F to 68F.

Beer2 OG 1.064, finished at 1.006. Fermented at 61F to 77F.



I want the 2nd flavor profile. My OG will be 1.100+.

When in the fermentation cycle are the flavors produced ? At the beginning or the end ?

If I finish fermenting at higher temps (75F+), will I get the 2nd flavor profile ?
 

thehaze

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Higher fermentation temperatures usually result in more esters, whereas phenols would be accentuated when fermentation is done at a lower temperature. Is it well-established knowledge? I cannot say. My experience has shown that there is some truth to it. I can also find lots of threads where brewers tell about their own experience with fermentation temperature, and most seem to agree that more fruity esters are formed when fermenting warmer. Note that even when an ester is more proeminent, the phenols will still be present, sometimes being less proeminent than the esters. You cannot avoid one thing, by trying to accentuate the other one. So I would choose Abbaye and ferment colder.

The main yeast profile is determined and created in the first part of fermentation. Raising the temperature at the tail of fermentation will not affect the already created ester / phenol profile.
 
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brewman !

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Thanks for the reply.

So did the 61F starting temp on brew #2 give the fruity flavor ?

I can't find Abbaye locally to brew this weekend. I can get M31 though.
 
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brewman !

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Higher fermentation temperatures usually result in more esters, whereas phenols would be accentuated when fermentation is done at a lower temperature. Is it well-established knowledge? I cannot say.
Thank you ! I did not know this. Esters vs. Phenols in Beer | American Homebrewers Association

My experience has shown that there is some truth to it. I can also find lots of threads where brewers tell about their own experience with fermentation temperature, and most seem to agree that more fruity esters are formed when fermenting warmer. Note that even when an ester is more proeminent, the phenols will still be present, sometimes being less proeminent than the esters. You cannot avoid one thing, by trying to accentuate the other one. So I would choose Abbaye and ferment colder.
I'll use that yeast in my next brew.

The main yeast profile is determined and created in the first part of fermentation. Raising the temperature at the tail of fermentation will not affect the already created ester / phenol profile.
Good to know.
 
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