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BeerShed Ceiling insulation

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ymiris

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Hey all, Long time lurker, first time poster. I have recently built a beer shed and I'm looking for ideas on how to insulate the ceiling while maintaining a good rafter look. I want to avoid spray insulation and anything that will be an eye sore if you look up. Any ideas?
I've shared two pictures, one of the shed itself and the other of the roof inside. As you can see it will need to be flexible and of course I will be brewing in here so something that does not absorb moisture
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wyowolf

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I would say that leaves only Rigid Foam board for insulation since you don't want spray or water absorption to be factors...

depending on where you are 2 in should give you a pretty good R value.
 

Jag75

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My brother n law has a some sheds like this . He has an insulation that he cut into strips and stapled up. It kind of looks like metal but it's not metal.
 
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ymiris

ymiris

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I would say that leaves only Rigid Foam board for insulation since you don't want spray or water absorption to be factors...

depending on where you are 2 in should give you a pretty good R value.
Thanks Wyowolf, I live in the PNW, so lots of rain but fairly mild compared to other areas. I will look at the rigid foam board, hopefully it's thin and not an eye sore :D
 
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ymiris

ymiris

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My brother n law has a some sheds like this . He has an insulation that he cut into strips and stapled up. It kind of looks like metal but it's not metal.
That sounds like something I would like! Any idea what it is?
 

wyowolf

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Thanks Wyowolf, I live in the PNW, so lots of rain but fairly mild compared to other areas. I will look at the rigid foam board, hopefully it's thin and not an eye sore :D
In that case you can probably get away with 1 in or 1.5 cut into strips. You can also get foil faced that looks like aluminum. Just make sure its closed cell foam so it wont absorb water... I would think in PNW thats what would be locally available anways.
 
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ymiris

ymiris

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In that case you can probably get away with 1 in or 1.5 cut into strips. You can also get foil faced that looks like aluminum. Just make sure its closed cell foam so it wont absorb water... I would think in PNW thats what would be locally available anways.
Thanks Wyowolf, this may be what I end up using.
 

probablynotnick

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You'll be able to find the closed cell foam board at any hardware store and it should work to an extent. To get the most out of your insulation, you will need to seal all the edges of the foam boards to the 2x4 rafters. Keep in mind that code in PNW dictates a system R-value of 49 or more, so you wont be insulating nearly as much as your home. I would think that 2" board would make a noticeable difference, but it's something to keep in mind.

Mechanical ventilation to deal with the humidity from brewing would be money/effort better spent IMHO... Otherwise you might want to insulate more than you are currently anticipating to make a more functional difference.
 
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Mitch S

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Mechanical ventilation to deal with the humidity from brewing would be money/effort better spent IMHO... Otherwise you might want to insulate more than you are currently anticipating to make a more functional difference.
I second this. Not knowing if you are electric or using a gas burner, I'd spend the money on mechanical ventilation to help keep air moving and not putting yourself at risk for carbon monoxide.

get polyiso insulation board if you want that metal look
This too. Or go the closed cell foam route.

I'd also check the wiring to the lights. I can't tell what kind of cable it is or what it's rated for, but I wouldn't want to see an awesome shed like that become a State Farm commercial...
 
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ymiris

ymiris

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I second this. Not knowing if you are electric or using a gas burner, I'd spend the money on mechanical ventilation to help keep air moving and not putting yourself at risk for carbon monoxide.



This too. Or go the closed cell foam route.

I'd also check the wiring to the lights. I can't tell what kind of cable it is or what it's rated for, but I wouldn't want to see an awesome shed like that become a State Farm commercial...
Thanks! Its all solar as of right now so no worries of a fire, or even much light ;) I did put in vents and windows throughout, so ventilation shouldn't be a big issue, I just didn't want any insulation absorbing the moisture when I brewed.
 

mongoose33

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Reflectix has an R factor of about 1....which isn't much. It'll only help much in reflecting not insulating.

From the inside view I see about a 1" gap in the OSB at the peak. Is that a ridge vent?

Whatever you put up has to be sealed otherwise if you get moisture between the insulation and the roof sheathing, you'll get rot.

What are your temperatures like during the coldest part of the year?
 

day_trippr

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Looking at the pic of the unfinished ceiling I'd go with the thickest rigid closed cell foam board that wouldn't run proud of the rafters then cover the whole thing with 1/2" shiplap pine...

Cheers!
 

SanPancho

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Im with @day_trippr here. Nothing is gonna look good after you put the rigid in and then go back and foam the gaps or tape them. Might as well just cover it up. Shiplap, tongue and groove, cheap flooring from lumber liquidators, etc.
 

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I’m certainly no maintenance technician, but it seems like fiberglass insulation is pretty good for the price. Seal it up there with some calking and whatever mil plastic plus staples and you could get pretty functional insulation for not much money. And if sagging was an issue you could drill little holes in the rafters and run braided wire to help support it all.
 

Mitch S

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Thanks! Its all solar as of right now so no worries of a fire, or even much light ;) I did put in vents and windows throughout, so ventilation shouldn't be a big issue, I just didn't want any insulation absorbing the moisture when I brewed.
Got it! Couldn't tell from the photos how you got power in there.

Shiplap, tongue and groove, cheap flooring from lumber liquidators, etc.
I was thinking about suggesting exactly what SanPancho did, but recently had to tear out laminate flooring I had recently installed due to the overflow pan on my AC unit not draining correctly, running down a wall, and underneath the floors. I still have exposed concrete in my hallway. If you go this route, I'd look into a sealer at least on the joints. That's where I found out I had a water issue when a joint between two planks started swelling. While the moisture created during a brew day won't be as bad as running water, still something to consider.
 
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ymiris

ymiris

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Thanks all, I think I have a pretty good idea of what to do. After looking at all the suggestions, closed cell spray foam seems to be the best idea, although it won't look pretty, it also won't require me to cover the rafters. Now to find it locally :)
 

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Just MHO, but if I were building an awesome brewery like this I would insulate it well with fiberglass insulation and face it with gloss white sanitary wall panels and caulk the seams so that the walls, ceiling, and floor can be cleaned and sanitized like a creamery, and also not offer any crevices for spiders, bugs, etc. to hide. "NRP® panels are made of durable non-fiberglass reinforced plastic. NRP® is designed specifically for areas requiring moisture resistance, sanitization and toughness to withstand demanding environments. You will have 100% waterproof installation when installed to manufacturers specifications."

It's just nice to know you can get it 100% clean when you need to.
 

SanPancho

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I was thinking of the ceilings, hadn’t considered the walls. For those id do like jayjay says, but with regular frp as its likely cheaper.

Theres also hardboard 1/4 with the white melamine finish, but thats not as water resistant as FRP. And frp does have all the trim pieces to seal it up tight.

Another thing to at least investigate is the new waterproof flooring they are selling theses days. The stuff i saw was wood finish, maybe 3/8 -so pretty light, tongue and groove, and stated to be 100% waterproof per the marketing materials. No idea on cost.
 
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ymiris

ymiris

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I was thinking of the ceilings, hadn’t considered the walls. For those id do like jayjay says, but with regular frp as its likely cheaper.

Theres also hardboard 1/4 with the white melamine finish, but thats not as water resistant as FRP. And frp does have all the trim pieces to seal it up tight.

Another thing to at least investigate is the new waterproof flooring they are selling theses days. The stuff i saw was wood finish, maybe 3/8 -so pretty light, tongue and groove, and stated to be 100% waterproof per the marketing materials. No idea on cost.
The floor idea is pretty good! Sadly I already went with linoleum squares and grouted it...maybe I should put a clear epoxy seal over the flooring as well?
 

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ymiris

ymiris

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Just MHO, but if I were building an awesome brewery like this I would insulate it well with fiberglass insulation and face it with gloss white sanitary wall panels and caulk the seams so that the walls, ceiling, and floor can be cleaned and sanitized like a creamery, and also not offer any crevices for spiders, bugs, etc. to hide. "NRP® panels are made of durable non-fiberglass reinforced plastic. NRP® is designed specifically for areas requiring moisture resistance, sanitization and toughness to withstand demanding environments. You will have 100% waterproof installation when installed to manufacturers specifications."

It's just nice to know you can get it 100% clean when you need to.
The vision I had for this brew shed was to both brew in it and host people in it. I wanted a rustic but usable space. I love the idea of the panels and I might be able to use the NPR that looks like wood for the side and front walls? I already insulated and put up a pallet wall on the back.
 

Jayjay1976

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Oh well, then as it's also a tap room I like where you're already headed. As for insulating the ceiling, use rigid foam board and hide it behind some nice wooden beadboard trimmed to fit between the roof beams. Maybe consider finishing it off with some decorative trusswork?

 
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ymiris

ymiris

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Oh well, then as it's also a tap room I like where you're already headed. As for insulating the ceiling, use rigid foam board and hide it behind some nice wooden beadboard trimmed to fit between the roof beams. Maybe consider finishing it off with some decorative trusswork?

I really like that look! I think you may be on to something :D
 
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