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Basement Brewery Walls

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Rich711

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I am in the process of moving my Brew operations (will be Electric) to the basement. I am trying to figure out what material I should use to cover the back wall of the brew area. The back wall is a concrete block wall. Previously I had water proofed the wall with 2 good coats of DryLok paint. Since the paint job, there has been zero evidence of moister, the block wall is bright white with no water stains or discoloration.

I am currently brew in my kitchen where I prep by wiping down the brew area with a bleach solution (3/4 cup of Clorox per gallon of water).

So I was thinking of using a smooth white waterproof wallboard that can be disinfected with the above Clorox solution.

What I have found, so far, are very expensive panels and sheets that are used in dairy operations. Most other plastic styles panels come with warning against using bleach to clean then.

So I am looking for some ideas on what to use to cover my waterproofed concrete block wall that would be waterproof, tolerant of a disinfectant and hopefully affordable.

Thanks

Rich
 

c0utz

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If it's in your budget I'd use stainless steel, or just simple ceramic tiles.
The advantage of SS is that you have one smooth continuous surface that is easier to clean and disinfect.
If you go the cheaper route and want tile it, make you apply a sealer or find that the grout accumulates grime and can be difficult to maintain.
Also make sure to check for compatibility between the sealer and your bleach solution

As for plastic panels, are you referring to FRP panels? As far as I know, they are chemical resistant. I have installed them in commercial bathrooms and the housekeeping staff use all sorts of stuff on them, and they have been there for at least 5 years now with no noticeable chemical damage.

Hope you find a solution!
 

lump42

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If the basement will be a finished and conditioned space (heating and AC), then you really should still install a proper vapor barrier, frame, and insulate the exterior walls. Then you could put up cement board and tiles, or plastic FRP panels.

Instead of using bleach solution, you could use quaternary ammonia disinfectants/ quats (lysol, 409, etc) or isopropyl alcohol. Both are much less corrosive. Quats even have a short residual effect after it dries.
 

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I am in the process of moving my Brew operations (will be Electric) to the basement. I am trying to figure out what material I should use to cover the back wall of the brew area. The back wall is a concrete block wall. Previously I had water proofed the wall with 2 good coats of DryLok paint. Since the paint job, there has been zero evidence of moister, the block wall is bright white with no water stains or discoloration.

I am currently brew in my kitchen where I prep by wiping down the brew area with a bleach solution (3/4 cup of Clorox per gallon of water).

So I was thinking of using a smooth white waterproof wallboard that can be disinfected with the above Clorox solution.

What I have found, so far, are very expensive panels and sheets that are used in dairy operations. Most other plastic styles panels come with warning against using bleach to clean then.

So I am looking for some ideas on what to use to cover my waterproofed concrete block wall that would be waterproof, tolerant of a disinfectant and hopefully affordable.

Thanks

Rich
Rich,

Since the wall is already sealed,
I suggest you just paint the block wall a color you like and use the money you saved on grains, hops, or equipment.
 

Soulshine2

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I am in the process of moving my Brew operations (will be Electric) to the basement. I am trying to figure out what material I should use to cover the back wall of the brew area. The back wall is a concrete block wall. Previously I had water proofed the wall with 2 good coats of DryLok paint. Since the paint job, there has been zero evidence of moister, the block wall is bright white with no water stains or discoloration.

I am currently brew in my kitchen where I prep by wiping down the brew area with a bleach solution (3/4 cup of Clorox per gallon of water).

So I was thinking of using a smooth white waterproof wallboard that can be disinfected with the above Clorox solution.

What I have found, so far, are very expensive panels and sheets that are used in dairy operations. Most other plastic styles panels come with warning against using bleach to clean then.

So I am looking for some ideas on what to use to cover my waterproofed concrete block wall that would be waterproof, tolerant of a disinfectant and hopefully affordable.

Thanks

Rich
first of all, 3/4 cup bleach to a gallon is way overdoing it. a simple 1 ounce will do 5 gallons. Paint your block with an epoxy paint so it can take some moisture and cleaning. Once it dries it should take some scrubbing without absorbing any thing like latex ever will. You'll get durability and a moisture barrier in the same step. Do 2 coats .
 

wilserbrewer

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Why do you feel the need to sanitize your kitchen surfaces or your basement walls prior to brewing?

Your making beer, not performing open heart surgery :)

Whatever wall covering suits you and your budget will be fine.

Sounds like the existing surface w/ dry loc paint over block would be adequate as well imo
 
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Rich711

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Why do you feel the need to sanitize your kitchen surfaces or your basement walls prior to brewing?

Your making beer, not performing open heart surgery :)

Whatever wall covering suits you and your budget will be fine.

Sounds like the existing surface w/ dry loc paint over block would be adequate as well imo
Well in the Kitchen, with all of the cutting up of raw meats and such, I thought the walls should be sanitized. I am only wiping down the walls by the sinks and stove where I brew. Not necessary? I also read that the cleaner your space, the longer your beer will last before spoilage sets in.
 
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balrog

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While you don't want large fans blowing air around with piles of rotting possums lying about, you really probably don't have to worry about garden variety airborn stuff.

I mean, the human being is a pretty nasty, aspirous thing, and I've never seen anyone promote not breathing whilst brewing.
 
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Rich711

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first of all, 3/4 cup bleach to a gallon is way overdoing it. a simple 1 ounce will do 5 gallons. Paint your block with an epoxy paint so it can take some moisture and cleaning. Once it dries it should take some scrubbing without absorbing any thing like latex ever will. You'll get durability and a moisture barrier in the same step. Do 2 coats .
If the basement will be a finished and conditioned space (heating and AC), then you really should still install a proper vapor barrier, frame, and insulate the exterior walls. Then you could put up cement board and tiles, or plastic FRP panels.

Instead of using bleach solution, you could use quaternary ammonia disinfectants/ quats (lysol, 409, etc) or isopropyl alcohol. Both are much less corrosive. Quats even have a short residual effect after it dries.
I was thinking of putting up a frame with vapor barrier and insulation. So I was looking for suggestions on what to finish the brewery walls with. I don't think I have the budget for Stainless.
 

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Don't listen to these fools. Construct yourself an airtight chamber made of pich coated staves. Then for sanitizing, go for a continuous mist of Dr. Lister's carbolic acid during the entire surgery, er, brew session. As soon as the dissection, er, boil is concluded, seal your creation up in a carboy, an airlock securely bunged therein, whenceupon you can silently evacuate the chamber and retire to the gallery for a pipe of opium and a dilution of laudanum to still the nerves.
 
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Soulshine2

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I was thinking of putting up a frame with vapor barrier and insulation. So I was looking for suggestions on what to finish the brewery walls with. I don't think I have the budget for Stainless.
as long as direct contact with water isnt a big factor but moisture in general is...you can use green board rather than regular drywall or tile backer. Then use a paint for use in bathrooms and kitchens.
 

Soulshine2

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Don't listen to these fools. Construct yourself an airtight chamber made of pich coated staves. Then for sanitizing, go for a continuous mist of Dr. Lister's carbolic acid during the entire surgery, er, brew session. As soon as the dissection, er, boil is concluded, seal your creation up in a carboy, an airlock securely bunged therein, whenceupon you can silently evacuate the chamber and retire to the gallery for a pipe of opium and a dilution of laudanum to still the nerves.
why do this when a nice bowl of cavendish and a snifter of brandy will suffice?
 

Soulshine2

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Well in the Kitchen, with all of the cutting up of raw meats and such, I thought the walls should be sanitized. I am only wiping down the walls by the sinks and stove where I brew. Not necessary? I also read that the cleaner your space, the longer your beer will last before spoilage sets in.
not really. dont overthink this . Clean is good, no need to wipe the room down like a surgical theater.
Maybe I'm at the other end of this. I brew in my pole barn.
 

lump42

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I was thinking of putting up a frame with vapor barrier and insulation. So I was looking for suggestions on what to finish the brewery walls with. I don't think I have the budget for Stainless.
No need to go with stainless unless it's for aesthetics. I would finish of with drywall and a decent paint. I usually go look at the reject cans. Stores will often remix it to something else for you. They color won't be exact but it'll be close. Unless you plan on hosing the walls and ceiling down, finish it like you might a bathroom. Directly around the sink you could go with RFP panels since those walls are more likely to get wet regularly.
 

webby45wr

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After I saw the price and annoyance of installing FRP panels, I also wanted something different. I got metal roofing from Lowe's and put it on the walls. A sheet is a little more than 2' wide and pretty simple to install and cut around outlets, etc. I think it was like $10 a sheet. I put this over a studded/insulated wall.
 

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Hwk-I-St8

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I brew in my garage. Sometimes I even sweep the floor first.

Seriously, hot side does not need to be cleaned that intensely. Use clean, mold free equipment and don't sweat it. Even the cold side does not demand that level of effort. Once you've chilled, ensure that everything the beer touches has been sanitized. Don't leave your chilled wort in an open environment, but you don't need to sanitize the air or all the surroundings. Brewing beer is not a clean room level process.

My buddy used to remove everything from the counter of his kitchen and sanitize the walls, counters and floors before brewing. It's no surprise he didn't stick with it. Even during the boil he was re-sanitizing the counters and the stir spoon.

I pull the cars out of the garage, set up a varnished piece of plywood on sawhorses, put the burner on the floor and go to work.

Neither one of us has had an infection.
 

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Drummingguy81, that is sick. Wow.

I used to hold my breath when I harvested yeast. I really thought it mattered. It was the guise of quality.

I have brewed in front of the concrete block foundation in my basement for the past several years. A lot of people brew outside (I did for years). If you're going to make yourself crazy with clean, focus on your fermenter. Other than that, relax.
 

itsnotrequired

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I was thinking of putting up a frame with vapor barrier and insulation. So I was looking for suggestions on what to finish the brewery walls with. I don't think I have the budget for Stainless.
are you looking to stud out the wall for insulation purposes? if not, what you have now should be fine. unless you are some type of wild brewer, the walls just don't get that dirty.

if you are looking to stud the wall out for insulation purposes, then i would recommend simply drywall with frp panels over the top. this is what i did behind my brew table. yes, the panels will run about $30 for an 4'x8' sheet once you factor in the trim pieces and adhesive but how many sheets are needed? maybe three? not a huge expense, imo. plus you don't have to mud/tape the drywall or paint anything.

and if you are going to stud out a concrete black basement wall, i HIGHLY recommend covering the walls with xps foam board before putting up the studs, especially if you have a damp basement. it functions as a vapor barrier and provides insulation (you can add more in the stud cavities for additional thermal or acoustical insulation). the common method of placing poly sheeting against the concrete and then the studs over that may help with stopping moisture from the wall getting into the space but doesn't do anything to stop the cold from getting in. this cold meets the warm, humid air from the conditioned space and you can get condensation on the interior side of the poly sheeting, resulting in condensation inside the stud cavity, which can lead to mold. the xps foam results in the dew point being 'inside' the foam itself, such that condensation cannot form on the interior face of the insulation.
 

Jako

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Drummingguy81, that is sick. Wow.

I used to hold my breath when I harvested yeast. I really thought it mattered. It was the guise of quality.

I have brewed in front of the concrete block foundation in my basement for the past several years. A lot of people brew outside (I did for years). If you're going to make yourself crazy with clean, focus on your fermenter. Other than that, relax.

i just think of it this way. its sitting in beer so some of the beer will keep it clean. never had an issue so far.
 
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Rich711

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Thank you for the all your comments and suggestions. I'm not sure, but I think that some of you think I may be obsessing just a little too much on my sanitizing operations.

My basement brew operation will not need vapor fame and panel construction. Phase 2, a basement Brew Pub may need insulated wall construction.

After reading all the comments, I have decided to put a finish coat of paint on the back wall of my brew area and worry about building the insulated wall when I finish the rest of the basement.
 
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Rich711

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I used light gauge aluminum diamond plate. I love it! Got it from cutsmetal.com they ship anywhere pretty reasonably. It comes in 4x8 or 4x10 sheets kinda pricy but for me it was buy once cry once. View attachment 610229
Cool Brew area. What kind of construction is behind the diamond plate.

PS - What make, model and vendor for your brew hoods?
 

Drumminguy81

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Cool Brew area. What kind of construction is behind the diamond plate.

PS - What make, model and vendor for your brew hoods?
It is regular frame and drywall behind the diamond plate. But it would be really easy to use an adhesive and stick them to any surface.

I will have to double check the models on the vent hoods but I believe they are range master. I scooped them both up off craigslist for $40 a couple years ago.
 

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After I saw the price and annoyance of installing FRP panels, I also wanted something different. I got metal roofing from Lowe's and put it on the walls. A sheet is a little more than 2' wide and pretty simple to install and cut around outlets, etc. I think it was like $10 a sheet. I put this over a studded/insulated wall.
@webby45wr ... I can't quite make out what you did for mounting equipment on the wall. Looks like maybe a panel bolted over the steel? Can you elaborate?

I'm planning the same for the back wall of my brewing area and this is one piece I'm trying to figure out.
 

webby45wr

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@matt_m

I mounted the control panel to a 3/4" plywood board. I then used lag bolts/washers to attach that board through the metal panels and directly into the studs. That is the recommended mounting option by eBrewSupply. I understand why they recommend that, mounting the panel to the board was a pain. I could only get 3 corners as the electrical components are in the way.

The metal panels also "poke" out further than drywall would, so I got electrical box extensions. Otherwise, I would not have been able to secure the cover plates without getting really long screws.
 

augiedoggy

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It is regular frame and drywall behind the diamond plate. But it would be really easy to use an adhesive and stick them to any surface.

I will have to double check the models on the vent hoods but I believe they are range master. I scooped them both up off craigslist for $40 a couple years ago.
I was under the impression that polished aluminum diamond plate would not hold up well cosmetically to spattered acidic and cleaners or wort and it would actually be a pain to clean.(same reasons its not used in kitchens).. do you not have any issues with splatter or spills? if so how is it holding up? I dont myself but then I dont have anything special on my walls to protect them either..
It does look sharp.
 

Drumminguy81

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I was under the impression that polished aluminum diamond plate would not hold up well cosmetically to spattered acidic and cleaners or wort and it would actually be a pain to clean.(same reasons its not used in kitchens).. do you not have any issues with splatter or spills? if so how is it holding up? I dont myself but then I dont have anything special on my walls to protect them either..
It does look sharp.
It's been excellent for several years now. I also I'm a pretty clean brewer. No splashing or over spray other than behind my sink and even there it still looks fine, maybe slightly hazy but I attribute that to the hardness of my water. I have never even needed to wipe any of it down.
 
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