Barley Crusher Frustration

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MSUCatBrewer

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I'm hoping somebody can offer some insight...

I got a Barley Crusher a month ago in preparation for my 1st AG batch. It came set at .038, I double checked the measurement, and I rolled with it. My efficiency came out low, so after reading some posts and some blogs, I decided a factor may have been the mill setting.

Yesterday, I set the crusher at .036, and the first hopper went through like a dream...I couldn't get the 2nd hopper to feed. After fiddling for 20 min, I backed off the crush and re-set it at .038 and it flew right through.

Has this happened to anybody else? By all accounts, the BC is a good mill...but I don't like that it wouldn't mill consistently at .036. Thoughts?
 

Yooper

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Barley Crusher sucks, in my opinion. I didn't use mine long at all before having the same issue- and it's been sent back twice.

I do get it to work by futzing around with it. One thing to do is to make sure you use a cheap clean paintbrush to clean it out after every use. Sometimes "crud" sticks inside the part where the rollers hit the metal, and taking it off and cleaning it out helps. Otherwise, it's a huge pain to use and I hate mine.

For a long standing gripe about Barley Crusher: https://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=297352

and for a quick tip on how to do some maintenance that often helps:
https://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=577512

and some defense (not much) of Barley Crusher, to be fair:
https://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=562413
 

Owly055

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The inevitable reply (barley crusher sucks), is absolutely useless. It doesn't address the problems inherent in the BC, or for that matter any mill of similar design. I've run well over 100 batches through mine, and in that time, I've had to dismantle it 2 or 3 times for cleaning.......... not an unreasonable amount of maintenance as it takes minutes only.

Here's the problem with the BC. First, it is a mill where only one roller drives. That means that the driven roller has to grab the grain, pull it down and drive the other roller. the diameter of the rollers is small compared to the grain, which results in a less than optimal ramp angle. The result is that the undriven roller must be able to turn very easily. The BC is built with two heavy aluminum ends connected by thin plates which are incapable of holding the works in perfect alignment. To make it completely rigid would add considerably to manufacturing cost, and it would no longer be an inexpensive mill.
This outlines the problems you must overcome.......... and I have. You have two choices..... buy an expensive mill, or loosen the two bolts that hold the mill down, which allows the ends to self align. The stupid solution.........the typical solution is to sell the mill cheap to someone else and spend a few hundred more. The intelligent solution is to look at the nature of the problem an simply loosen one or both bolts slightly. Mine is mounted on a three legged stand made of steel. My neighbor and I have ground many hundreds of pounds of grain through it with almost no problem. Once in awhile I have to reach under and spin the non-driven wheel to get things going....but not often.... maybe every 5 batches. I do NOT tighten the two mounting bolts, and I have two pieces attached to the platform that keep the mill from moving around excessively.

It's really quite easy...............

If I had my "druthers", I'd manufacture my own mill with 4" diameter wheels or so, both driven. It's the sort of thing I do all the time. But the BC does an excellent job, and has for several years now and shows no sign of wearing out. It's served me very well, but unlike some folks I don't just say "junk throw it away"........... A lifetime of engineering quickly revealed the problem and the solution. You can throw money at the problem as many have done, and buy something fancy and expensive, or you can take half a turn of a wrench...........

You don't always get what you pay for, but you seldom get what you don't pay for.....
I've communicated with the manufacturer about this, and the reality of manufacturing is not alien to me. I've discussed the solutions with him, and the costs. You aren't going to get a monster mill or cereal killer for the price of a BC mill. It's unfortunate that he hasn't seen fit to address this, at least to the extent of providing instructions to his buyers.

Again, there have been many hundreds of pounds of grain run through my BC, but it took me only one or two uses to discover and resolve the problems. Since then it's been reliable and trouble free.

H.W.


I'm hoping somebody can offer some insight...

I got a Barley Crusher a month ago in preparation for my 1st AG batch. It came set at .038, I double checked the measurement, and I rolled with it. My efficiency came out low, so after reading some posts and some blogs, I decided a factor may have been the mill setting.

Yesterday, I set the crusher at .036, and the first hopper went through like a dream...I couldn't get the 2nd hopper to feed. After fiddling for 20 min, I backed off the crush and re-set it at .038 and it flew right through.

Has this happened to anybody else? By all accounts, the BC is a good mill...but I don't like that it wouldn't mill consistently at .036. Thoughts?
 

The_Bishop

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Damn near every homebrewer mill out there is one roller driven. My 3-roller mill is 1 roller driven and has *zero* issues after countless batches of beer. That's not an excuse. It also has 'only thin metal' to hold the end plates in alignment (*and* the base). Again, shouldn't be an issue.

The Barley Crusher rollers are made out of junk soft metal, and they're too small in diameter. In short order, the knurling loses it's bite on the grain and then the slipping starts. It's crap. The Chinese knockoffs are better. I've got a Cereal killer that I was using before my 3-roller mill that actually served as a backup mill for my LHBS when his mill (he made the mistake of buying a BC trying to pinch pennies) crapped the bed in short order. It has literally hundreds of pounds of grain through it and it still works.

In short? The Barley Crusher is junk and nobody should buy one. The warranty is a joke and it takes way too long to get the 'repaired' mill back, which will only work for a short while before slipping again.
 
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I have the same problems with mine. It has been pretty frustrating. I'll eventually replace it but if you are looking for a fix that might get you through a few more brew days, this has worked for me in the interim. Grab a bag of o rings that fit around the roller, I think it's 1.5", take the mill apart and put the o ring around one roller and reassemble. Now when one turns it should turn the other roller. This isn't a permanent fix since the o ring will eventually shred but like I said it can buy you a couple brew days till you can get a better fix or buy a new mill, which is my plan.
 

whovous

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I had problems with my BC until I followed the links on disassembling, cleaning and reassembling without overtightening. It has worked fine since. Gotta keep it fairly clean, though.

I am not sure I would buy it again if I was starting over but it is working well for the nonce.
 

Owly055

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I had problems with my BC until I followed the links on disassembling, cleaning and reassembling without overtightening. It has worked fine since. Gotta keep it fairly clean, though.

I am not sure I would buy it again if I was starting over but it is working well for the nonce.

Again........ You get what you pay for....... sometimes. You can hate it........ or make it work. It doesn't take a lot of effort to do either, but it says a lot about the owner. Mine has paid for itself many times over. You can get a lot out of a $100 mill (sale price).... If you have the native intelligence to make it work.........

H .W.
 
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MSUCatBrewer

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Well...after reading these posts, I'm equal parts confused and frustrated...

Part of why I bought a BC was because the people on this forum overwhelmingly recommended it. Also, the online reviews were good, as were reviews on several other homebrew sites.

This wasn't a DISCOUNT mill...I paid around $130 for it. I could have gotten a Corona for $25. There's got to be a reason a lot of people like this mill...
 

Yooper

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This wasn't a DISCOUNT mill...I paid around $130 for it. I could have gotten a Corona for $25. There's got to be a reason a lot of people like this mill...
I don't know. I guess if you only do a couple of batches a year, or only crush about 7 pounds or so at a time, it could be fine I guess. I am not someone who put a thousand pounds of grain through it before having an issue though, maybe more like 100.

That "slave" roller just doesn't turn once the knurls wear down a tiny bit. You can stick your hand under it and get it turning, or sometimes turn it backwards a half-turn, and it works ok, but it's always been a bit of a pain for me. Of course, I haven't replaced it and instead just mess around with it and get it to work well enough so I guess that would be a "meh" review instead of good or really bad.
 

brick_haus

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The inevitable reply (barley crusher sucks), is absolutely useless. It doesn't address the problems inherent in the BC, or for that matter any mill of similar design. I've run well over 100 batches through mine, and in that time, I've had to dismantle it 2 or 3 times for cleaning.......... not an unreasonable amount of maintenance as it takes minutes only.



Here's the problem with the BC. First, it is a mill where only one roller drives. That means that the driven roller has to grab the grain, pull it down and drive the other roller. the diameter of the rollers is small compared to the grain, which results in a less than optimal ramp angle. The result is that the undriven roller must be able to turn very easily. The BC is built with two heavy aluminum ends connected by thin plates which are incapable of holding the works in perfect alignment. To make it completely rigid would add considerably to manufacturing cost, and it would no longer be an inexpensive mill.

This outlines the problems you must overcome.......... and I have. You have two choices..... buy an expensive mill, or loosen the two bolts that hold the mill down, which allows the ends to self align. The stupid solution.........the typical solution is to sell the mill cheap to someone else and spend a few hundred more. The intelligent solution is to look at the nature of the problem an simply loosen one or both bolts slightly. Mine is mounted on a three legged stand made of steel. My neighbor and I have ground many hundreds of pounds of grain through it with almost no problem. Once in awhile I have to reach under and spin the non-driven wheel to get things going....but not often.... maybe every 5 batches. I do NOT tighten the two mounting bolts, and I have two pieces attached to the platform that keep the mill from moving around excessively.



It's really quite easy...............



If I had my "druthers", I'd manufacture my own mill with 4" diameter wheels or so, both driven. It's the sort of thing I do all the time. But the BC does an excellent job, and has for several years now and shows no sign of wearing out. It's served me very well, but unlike some folks I don't just say "junk throw it away"........... A lifetime of engineering quickly revealed the problem and the solution. You can throw money at the problem as many have done, and buy something fancy and expensive, or you can take half a turn of a wrench...........



You don't always get what you pay for, but you seldom get what you don't pay for.....

I've communicated with the manufacturer about this, and the reality of manufacturing is not alien to me. I've discussed the solutions with him, and the costs. You aren't going to get a monster mill or cereal killer for the price of a BC mill. It's unfortunate that he hasn't seen fit to address this, at least to the extent of providing instructions to his buyers.



Again, there have been many hundreds of pounds of grain run through my BC, but it took me only one or two uses to discover and resolve the problems. Since then it's been reliable and trouble free.



H.W.

Like Yooper said... it's junk. If you need to fix it right out of the box before it will properly work, it shouldn't even be on the market.
This manufacturer is taking advantage of a market for homebrewers that are trying to be frugal by supplying an inferior product.
Cut your losses and buy a MM.
 

eric19312

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Mine did fine today. I was sure I was in trouble as the grist was 88% marris otter which normally gives me problems but it sailed through and I hit 82% efficiency vs my standard 78%.

I'd love an excuse to buy a new brewing gadget but so far can't justify replacing this unit. Closing in on 4,000 lbs of grain so far and it keeps chugging along.

I do get the issue on some batches where I need to give the non driven roller a bit of encouragement, I don't go underneath I have a long handled plastic spoon and I poke it down into the grain till i feel the roller and give it a nudge. I'm sure there are better mills available but for now I'm doing fine.
 

Bigfly

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I have had mine for 2 years now and have run over 300 lbs of grain through it without problems. After every use i take it out to the garage and clean it good with compressed air. I target the ends of the rollers and make sure the rollers turn freely and have end play. I have not lubricated it yet and have not had a stuck roller.
 

MaryB

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Keep the bearings clean and lubed and keep the rollers clean, I am around 3k pounds of grain through mine and counting. I use a small brass brush to scrub the rollers and you will be amazed at the glazed bits of grain smeared on that will come off.
 

augiedoggy

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The inevitable reply (barley crusher sucks), is absolutely useless. It doesn't address the problems inherent in the BC, or for that matter any mill of similar design. I've run well over 100 batches through mine, and in that time, I've had to dismantle it 2 or 3 times for cleaning.......... not an unreasonable amount of maintenance as it takes minutes only.

Here's the problem with the BC. First, it is a mill where only one roller drives. That means that the driven roller has to grab the grain, pull it down and drive the other roller. the diameter of the rollers is small compared to the grain, which results in a less than optimal ramp angle. The result is that the undriven roller must be able to turn very easily. The BC is built with two heavy aluminum ends connected by thin plates which are incapable of holding the works in perfect alignment. To make it completely rigid would add considerably to manufacturing cost, and it would no longer be an inexpensive mill.
This outlines the problems you must overcome.......... and I have. You have two choices..... buy an expensive mill, or loosen the two bolts that hold the mill down, which allows the ends to self align. The stupid solution.........the typical solution is to sell the mill cheap to someone else and spend a few hundred more. The intelligent solution is to look at the nature of the problem an simply loosen one or both bolts slightly. Mine is mounted on a three legged stand made of steel. My neighbor and I have ground many hundreds of pounds of grain through it with almost no problem. Once in awhile I have to reach under and spin the non-driven wheel to get things going....but not often.... maybe every 5 batches. I do NOT tighten the two mounting bolts, and I have two pieces attached to the platform that keep the mill from moving around excessively.

It's really quite easy...............

If I had my "druthers", I'd manufacture my own mill with 4" diameter wheels or so, both driven. It's the sort of thing I do all the time. But the BC does an excellent job, and has for several years now and shows no sign of wearing out. It's served me very well, but unlike some folks I don't just say "junk throw it away"........... A lifetime of engineering quickly revealed the problem and the solution. You can throw money at the problem as many have done, and buy something fancy and expensive, or you can take half a turn of a wrench...........

You don't always get what you pay for, but you seldom get what you don't pay for.....
I've communicated with the manufacturer about this, and the reality of manufacturing is not alien to me. I've discussed the solutions with him, and the costs. You aren't going to get a monster mill or cereal killer for the price of a BC mill. It's unfortunate that he hasn't seen fit to address this, at least to the extent of providing instructions to his buyers.

Again, there have been many hundreds of pounds of grain run through my BC, but it took me only one or two uses to discover and resolve the problems. Since then it's been reliable and trouble free.

H.W.
I didnt bother reading the whole post here but I will point out something...
The cereal killer and chinese clones use the same diameter rollers and adjustment system in a cheaper costing mill which does not suffer from the issues that the more expensive barley crusher does. I have never once had to clean my cereal killer in the almost 4 years ive owned it and it still works great. the only issues Ive ever had were with the belt failing on my belt driven motor setup to run it. As ive said before a simple google search reveals these mills suck and are just about the only mil you will find common complaints about when doing such a search.

IMO the barley crusher is an inferior quality mill because the rollers are junk and the use very cheap bronze bushings instead of bearings to maximize the profits while offering an inferior product to every other homebrewing mill Ive seen.
 

augiedoggy

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Keep the bearings clean and lubed and keep the rollers clean, I am around 3k pounds of grain through mine and counting. I use a small brass brush to scrub the rollers and you will be amazed at the glazed bits of grain smeared on that will come off.
what bearings? the BC uses bronze bushings instead... thats one of its weaknesses.
 

augiedoggy

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Again........ You get what you pay for....... sometimes. You can hate it........ or make it work. It doesn't take a lot of effort to do either, but it says a lot about the owner. Mine has paid for itself many times over. You can get a lot out of a $100 mill (sale price).... If you have the native intelligence to make it work.........

H .W.
"Again....." read above... cheaper chinese mills direct or rebranded as cereal killer is a better mill. You most certainly dont always get better quality for more money... Sometimes you just give more middlemen or a single greedier retailer more money for the same or worse product.

Your implied arguement that the buyer is stupid because they dont want to have to constantly fuss with the mill to keep it working as you have is flawed here. Crap should be called out for what it is...
 
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I have the same problems with mine. It has been pretty frustrating. I'll eventually replace it but if you are looking for a fix that might get you through a few more brew days, this has worked for me in the interim. Grab a bag of o rings that fit around the roller, I think it's 1.5", take the mill apart and put the o ring around one roller and reassemble. Now when one turns it should turn the other roller. This isn't a permanent fix since the o ring will eventually shred but like I said it can buy you a couple brew days till you can get a better fix or buy a new mill, which is my plan.
I did the o-ring thing a few times. It works.
 
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Like Yooper said... it's junk. If you need to fix it right out of the box before it will properly work, it shouldn't even be on the market.
This manufacturer is taking advantage of a market for homebrewers that are trying to be frugal by supplying an inferior product.
Cut your losses and buy a MM.
I don't think he's intentionally ripping anyone off. When I dealt with him, he just seemed a little overwelmed. My unit worked for close to 3 years, so it did it's job.

However, he should address the design issues, and stop cranking out new units until he figures out a fix.
 

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I did the o-ring thing a few times. It works.
Mine came with the O-ring....and it disappeared after about, oh, 10 uses of the BC. It's worked fairly well for me. I reduced the gap significantly for BIAB, and while slower, it still works--though this last time, for the first time, I had a "stuck crush." Spinning, no pulling the grain through. I removed the grain from the hopper, manually turned the rollers, and it worked again. I may try the O-Ring thing suggested by November above.

I have a MM on my Christmas list (you can never start too soon to begin your Christmas list :)).
 

The_Bishop

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I'm not sure I agree with bushings being inferior to bearings; my monster mill 3-roller is all bushings with no issues... But let's not split hairs.

If I buy a BC and soon have to fiddle with it to keep the crush going: That's going to piss me off, especially if I see people with a 'knockoff' cheaper Cereal Killer happily milling away with no problems. (Not sure if you can classify the Cereal Killer as a 'knockoff' if it's an improved design, especially if you consider that there are only so many ways you can configure a 2 roller mill.)

A Mill is a simple device. There's not much to screw up. What goes wrong with the BC is the rollers are very, very soft and the knurling goes dull very quickly. With the rollers being small in diameter and the knurling dull, it can't get a bite on the grain to draw it through the gap in the rollers. In the several BC mill failures I tried to fix for a few fellow homebrewers, there was only *one* that was a result of junk jamming up the non-driven roller. That one was an old BC that wasn't used much, and from the looks of the rollers they used to be pretty good. The others were all dull rollers and all 'newer'.

What I like about my mill? I put it on the bucket, turn it on, and dump in the grain. It mills. No fuss, no headaches. When I'm done milling I blow the dust out of it, and store it back on the shelf. Not once has it failed to mill.

 
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Mine came with the O-ring....and it disappeared after about, oh, 10 uses of the BC. It's worked fairly well for me. I reduced the gap significantly for BIAB, and while slower, it still works--though this last time, for the first time, I had a "stuck crush." Spinning, no pulling the grain through. I removed the grain from the hopper, manually turned the rollers, and it worked again. I may try the O-Ring thing suggested by November above.

I have a MM on my Christmas list (you can never start too soon to begin your Christmas list :)).
You've never heard of 'Christmas in July'?
 

mongoose33

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You've never heard of 'Christmas in July'?
I've got the elves working on it. :)

If I could find someone to take my BC off my hands for, say, $75, I think I could cobble together enough other funding to get me into the MM game. But i want something a bit more substantial to power it, such that I end up with something like The_Bishop has in his post above, or IslandLizard has in this post:

https://www.homebrewtalk.com/showpost.php?p=8047993&postcount=13

I want to do it right.
 

kh54s10

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I have been using a Corona style mill for 6 years. I get consistent 70% or so efficiency. I have never taken it apart to clean!! I want a roller mill, and have looked at reviews. The Barley Crusher mill was taken off the possible list years ago because I have been reading bad reviews for years. I will probably be going with a Monster Mill when I upgrade - if I ever do.

I would say that if most buyers have to fiddle with a product shortly after buying it, it is not a quality product. The BC is not a cheap mill either. There are cheaper ones that get better reviews.
 

jabba11

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I have had a barley crusher the same one fro three years. I roll probably 700-800 pounds of grain through it a year so its had probably 2500 pounds or better run through it. I took it apart once in that time and cleaned it. I DO blow it out after every use with compressed air and I oil the rollers from time to time. That's my experience. They have a lifetime warranty or so I have been told. Ive never had to contact them though so cant speak to the service.
 

day_trippr

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My BC experience parallels ^jabba11's^ - I also thoroughly blow out the mill after use and occasionally hit the bushings with lube.
Fingers crossed, I've never had a problem. It works just like a real mill ;)

Cheers!
 

02RedWS6TA

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I didn't read the entire post but I've done at least 650 pounds through mine, haven't done anything other than use it. I tap it on the edge of the bucket when I'm done to knock some of the dust off. Other than that I've never taken it apart or done anything to clean it. I just recently adjusted my crush to .039 after 10 months of .042, it was still set at .042 when I adjusted it. My lhbs also uses this as their Mill. I can't remember how many thousands of pounds she said went through it before sending it in for a rebuild but it was a lot.

For the price I couldn't have asked for a better piece of equipment. It's the only problem free piece of brewing equipment I own. Knock on wood...
 

jtp137

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I finally got rid of mine and couldn't be happier no more jamming a screwdriver into the rollers to get the dead roller to spin
 

Shawn0522

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I don't think he's intentionally ripping anyone off. When I dealt with him, he just seemed a little overwelmed. My unit worked for close to 3 years, so it did it's job.

However, he should address the design issues, and stop cranking out new units until he figures out a fix.
I have had mine a little over 1.5 years. At about 6 months started haveing problems similiar to yooper and hobbled along with it till i finally had enough and emaild BC. I have sent 3 emails over the last 4 months with no response at all. If he has a lifetime warranty that he doesnt honor then he is ripping people off in my opinion. I am not alone there are a lot of people in the same situation if you read the other threads. I just bought a 3 roller mill from kegco for not much more than what a BC costs. I think 2 roller version is probably same price. Bigger rollers more sturdy and bearings.
 

augiedoggy

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A bronze bushing IS a bearing, albeit a simple one. I use a tiny bit of mineral oil on mine every so often after taking it apart for a deep clean. 90% of BC problems are related to grain dust buildup...
I'm pretty sure it's not.. Hence the the term "bronze bushing" and not "bronze bearing". A bushing is normally used for instances where there not constant motion involved but rather intermittent movement.. its a sacraficial filler meant to be replaced more often. They wear out pretty quickly compared to ball or needle bearings.. This is why bushings are normally used in hinges and such and bearings are used in axles, driveshafts, wheels and such where longer maintained motion situations are normally found.

I could be wrong though.. Its only my understanding from maintaining and repairing machinery for 20 years..
 

augiedoggy

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I've got the elves working on it. :)

If I could find someone to take my BC off my hands for, say, $75, I think I could cobble together enough other funding to get me into the MM game. But i want something a bit more substantial to power it, such that I end up with something like The_Bishop has in his post above, or IslandLizard has in this post:

https://www.homebrewtalk.com/showpost.php?p=8047993&postcount=13

I want to do it right.
The reality is any other $99 mill will work great in comparison for the reasons already mentioned... Disregard this fact if your just trying to justify an MM mill to yourself...
 

augiedoggy

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My BC experience parallels ^jabba11's^ - I also thoroughly blow out the mill after use and occasionally hit the bushings with lube.
Fingers crossed, I've never had a problem. It works just like a real mill ;)

Cheers!
Ok would you rather spend $100 on a knife that needs to be sharpened every week to hold and edge or $100 on a knife that holds it's edge for months at a time? Which do you think is the better quality item at a better value and which do you think will hold up longer?
 

day_trippr

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I don't know that I'd equate a ~60 second compressor blow-out to resharpening knives, but I'm not the one beating a drum.

If you think a simple testimonial = advocacy, please think again.
I've never advocated for BC, I'm just a satisfied user...

Cheers!
 

jabba11

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right.. The hate for BC runs pretty deep in this thread. If theres something better cheaper use it. That's how a market economy works. I am only saying I haven't had any problems with mine. Additionally I don't see any real problems with the knurling or crush Im getting from it after three years. Im just stating my experience with it not saying its better or worse than anything.
 
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MSUCatBrewer

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right.. The hate for BC runs pretty deep in this thread. If theres something better cheaper use it. That's how a market economy works. I am only saying I haven't had any problems with mine. Additionally I don't see any real problems with the knurling or crush Im getting from it after three years. Im just stating my experience with it not saying its better or worse than anything.
What do you have your crusher set at? It comes at .038 - .039. I adjusted mine back to .036 and that's when I ran into the problem.
 

day_trippr

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fwiw, I run barley malts at .035 and wheat at .030.
I've been conditioning all grains for the last many batches and could probably go tighter as a result.
But I'm already hitting 90-something percent extraction so motivation is low...

Cheers!
 

Turkeyshot

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I bought a Cereal Killer the price was better and so were the reviews. I have been using it for at least 3 years and have never had a problem with it whatsoever.
 

Qhrumphf

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Ran hundreds and hundreds of pounds through my BC before it started slipping. And that's set at 0.030 gap (not conditioned either). Brush it out after every use. Only now after brewing almost weekly at home for years and now weekly as a mill for our pilot do I have issues, and it just means stripping and cleaning the fittings every 40-50 odd pounds of grain so the passive roller keeps moving.

I actually found lubrication of the joints made it more likely to seize up so I don't so that any more. Just disassemle and clean it out really

Perhaps they went even cheaper in recent years.
 

jabba11

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What do you have your crusher set at? It comes at .038 - .039. I adjusted mine back to .036 and that's when I ran into the problem.
I actually have mine set at .038 but only because of the system I have (recirc in the mash in a malt tube similar to a grainfather but on a bigger scale). I have had it set as low as .035 and have never had much of a problem except the occasional rock that finds its way in there.
 

jabba11

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fwiw, I run barley malts at .035 and wheat at .030.
I've been conditioning all grains for the last many batches and could probably go tighter as a result.
But I'm already hitting 90-something percent extraction so motivation is low...

Cheers!
I don't get into the 90's but I get into the low to mid 80's regularly and am happy with that out of my system
 

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