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BBKing

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Anyone see the Midwest Supplies catalogs flavoring additions section?

You'll see Wormwood.

Says something to the effect of "Primary ingredient for absinthe. The FDA does not recommend this be taken internally"

Maybe I'm slow on the up-take, but I got a good chuckle out of this.
 

weirdboy

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A few months ago I had a mead that a fellow homebrewer had added wormwood to as an experiment.

However much it was, he added too much. Way too much. It was completely undrinkable. So, if you're thinking about it, just be extremely careful on the quantity. You can always add more flavoring, but you cannot take it away.
 

jpc

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I don't understand the fascination with wormwood. From what I've read, the supposed effects have been greatly exaggerated. To me, it just seems like some "forbidden fruits" nonsense.

To each his own, I guess...
 

KYB

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Wormwood, or anything else in absinthe for that matter, does not have any hallucinogenic or psychotropic effects. It's just like any other liquor as far as effects go.
 

KYB

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Because it's the government. Pot is illegal and alcohol isn't, when booze are worse for you. They believe the big media hype on everything. Forget scientific research, the media knows all!
 

JMG680

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Makes no sense then why the gov would continue outlawing it, contrary to the not-so-recent lift on banning absinthe in the states. :confused:
Absinthe has been portrayed as a dangerously addictive psychoactive drug. The chemical thujone, present in small quantities, was singled out and blamed for its alleged harmful effects. Spurred by the temperance movement and the winemakers’ associations, absinthe was publicly associated with violent crimes and social disorder to keep sales down and to raise sales of wine.

By 1915, absinthe had been banned in the United States and in most European countries except the United Kingdom, Sweden, Spain, Portugal, Denmark and the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Although absinthe was vilified, no evidence has shown it to be any more dangerous than ordinary spirits. Its psychoactive properties, apart from those of alcohol, have been much exaggerated

A revival of absinthe began in the 1990s, when countries in the European Union began to reauthorize its manufacture and sale. As of February 2008, nearly 200 brands of absinthe were being produced in a dozen countries. Commercial distillation of absinthe in the United States resumed in 2007
 
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