adding steeped grain to finished beer

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OakIslandBrewery

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Has anyone added a steeped grain mixture to a finished beer to enhance the flavor? Since specialty grains are steeped (rather than mashed) to contribute aspects such as sweetness, roast character or color to a beer then why couldn't they be added after fermentation if a finished beers lacks some of that. After steeping it would need to be boiled and cooled and would thin out the finished beer some but it could save a beer that lacks some of those characters. Just a thought . . . and thanks for any comments!
 

Komodo

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Yes, though I wouldn't recommend it as a regular practice. I had a RIS that attenuated much farther than anticipated and the resulting beer was fairly thin. I steeped grains (chocolate, maybe crystal?) and added it to the fermenter and it was definitely better. But that was a really big beer where changes are probably more buffered.

Typically, trying to "save" a beer doesn't really end up the way you think it will. Another way you can do similar is to blend beers if you are in the position to do so.
 

Genuine

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You also have to keep in mind that grain contains a ton of micro organisms on them that could potentially sour/spoil the beer. It's sort of like combining flour and water to make a sourdough starter....whatever wild yeast there is on the flour spontaneously ferments and creates your own starter culture.
 

eric19312

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Best to make a tincture. For a dark beer like a stout or porter nothing wrong with punching up the flavor with something like coffee, vanilla or chocolate. Soak them in vodka or even better bourbon for a week and then strain into keg of bottling bucket. That can give you a nice flavor boost without adding microorganisms or fermentable sugars.
 
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OakIslandBrewery

OakIslandBrewery

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Good points. Some of the fermentable sugar would add more sweetness if it didn't start fermenting again. For acidity part I'll have to read more int that.
Yes, though I wouldn't recommend it as a regular practice. I had a RIS that attenuated much farther than anticipated and the resulting beer was fairly thin. I steeped grains (chocolate, maybe crystal?) and added it to the fermenter and it was definitely better. But that was a really big beer where changes are probably more buffered.

Typically, trying to "save" a beer doesn't really end up the way you think it will. Another way you can do similar is to blend beers if you are in the position to do so.
I've done blending before but that ends up with more beer, not always a bad thing though. All great points to ponder - Thanks!
 

Beermeister32

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Would be better not to do this. Remember, Adding grain to wort is one of the methods used to sour beer with bacteria. So your method would likely end up as a sour of some type, weird. Even then you boil the wort to stop the souring process.

Would be better to steep your grains in a medium size pot on the stove, then bring up to a boil for 15 minutes. You could safely add that to your beer for the same effect.
 
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OakIslandBrewery

OakIslandBrewery

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Would be better not to do this. Remember, Adding grain to wort is one of the methods used to sour beer with bacteria. So your method would likely end up as a sour of some type, weird. Even then you boil the wort to stop the souring process.

Would be better to steep your grains in a medium size pot on the stove, then bring up to a boil for 15 minutes. You could safely add that to your beer for the same effect.
That's what I was thinking could be safely done and only add the flavors of the specialty grains. I do appreciate all of the suggestions and ideas. I wasn't really going to do this but I was wondering what the HBT thought on this subject.
 
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