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Old 10-24-2012, 02:08 PM   #1
grumpyn55
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Is there any advantage to a triclad pot ( mega pot) verses a single layer pot ( stout blicmen) for boiling wort thanks in advance



 
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Old 10-24-2012, 03:16 PM   #2
SpikeBrewing
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On paper, yes. Practically, not really.

Now we offer single layer kettles BUT we used to sell the same exact kettles the MegaPots are made from so I'll try and give an unbiased answer...

The tri-ply kettles can be marketed very easily as a 'no scorching kettle'. But in real life the tri-ply kettles are designed for making thick soups and sauces in restaurants; not making beer. The sauces and soups have a much higher tendency to scorch than beer.

Out of all the kettles we've sold I have NEVER had even one person mention anything about scorching with their kettle. Companies like Blichmann and Stout would also not be around if all single layer kettles did was scorch the wort.

The three main reasons we ditched the tri-ply kettles and moved exclusively to the single layers were:
1. Add cost with no real added benefit
2. Added weight
3. MegaPots are wider than tall


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Old 10-24-2012, 04:00 PM   #3
grumpyn55
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Thanks for the info. Am looking to upgrade to 10 gal. Pot so am try ing to get as much info am leaning toward s eather one of yours or a stout
Thanks again

 
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Old 11-13-2012, 04:40 AM   #4
brewguyver
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I have a similar question to the OP, but more around durability and size-to-performance considerations. I'm looking for a setup that could take heavy use (potentially in a Brew-on-premise application), without the pain of dealing with the internal surfaces on keggles.

Also, what's the driver (other than space) on a taller kettle vs. a wider kettle (both for mash and for boil)? I'm more concerned with heating speed and utility efficiency than use of space. I'd think a shallower, wider kettle with an aluminum plated bottom would heat faster, and would work better for a whirlpool. A taller kettle might be better for a mash tun, since the false bottom would be smaller and the grain bed would make for a better filter. Since I'm looking at HERMS for the mash tun I'm not worried about direct fire efficiency.

 
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Old 11-13-2012, 04:58 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brewguyver View Post
I have a similar question to the OP, but more around durability and size-to-performance considerations. I'm looking for a setup that could take heavy use (potentially in a Brew-on-premise application), without the pain of dealing with the internal surfaces on keggles.

Also, what's the driver (other than space) on a taller kettle vs. a wider kettle (both for mash and for boil)? I'm more concerned with heating speed and utility efficiency than use of space. I'd think a shallower, wider kettle with an aluminum plated bottom would heat faster, and would work better for a whirlpool. A taller kettle might be better for a mash tun, since the false bottom would be smaller and the grain bed would make for a better filter. Since I'm looking at HERMS for the mash tun I'm not worried about direct fire efficiency.
Care to explain what you're talking about here?? I've yet to have any 'pain of dealing with the internal surface on keggles'...

BTW, keggles are typically 1.3mm thick 304 stainless steel. I've had no issues with using them in my brewing setup. I have a keggle mash tun, keggle BK and I'm making a short pony keggle HLT to use this weekend. LOVE the built-in handles that cannot be broken. Only things that stick out from them are the fittings as you install (or have installed).

Don't be too fast to dismiss keggles.
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Old 11-13-2012, 05:06 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brewguyver View Post
I have a similar question to the OP, but more around durability and size-to-performance considerations. I'm looking for a setup that could take heavy use (potentially in a Brew-on-premise application), without the pain of dealing with the internal surfaces on keggles.

Also, what's the driver (other than space) on a taller kettle vs. a wider kettle (both for mash and for boil)? I'm more concerned with heating speed and utility efficiency than use of space. I'd think a shallower, wider kettle with an aluminum plated bottom would heat faster, and would work better for a whirlpool. A taller kettle might be better for a mash tun, since the false bottom would be smaller and the grain bed would make for a better filter. Since I'm looking at HERMS for the mash tun I'm not worried about direct fire efficiency.
Durability wise anything stainless will work just fine.

The tri-clad bottom kettles actually heat slower than single layer kettles. We've also done heating tests with our kettles vs keggles. Keggles take longer because of the thicker materials.
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Old 11-13-2012, 05:16 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeBrewing View Post
Durability wise anything stainless will work just fine.

The tri-clad bottom kettles actually heat slower than single layer kettles. We've also done heating tests with our kettles vs keggles. Keggles take longer because of the thicker materials.
IME, with the right burner, used the right way, the time difference you're talking about is negligible. I've been able to get more wort to a boil in my keggle than another brewer in an aluminum kettle. Two different make/model burners were used which helps to indicate how it's more burner dependent than kettle/keggle.

BTW, I don't even mind if it takes a few more minutes (if that) to heat up in my keggle compared with a thinner walled kettle. Durability of keggles is almost legendary. Thin wall kettles, not so much. As a test, kick both as hard as you can and see which one is deformed.
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On Tap: Caramel Ale, Mocha Porter II, MO SMaSH IPA
Waiting/Carbonating: 12.5% Wee Honey II, 8.9% Old Ale, English Brown Ale, Lickah ESB, Mocha Porter II
Fermenting
K1:
K2: Epic mead
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Old 11-13-2012, 05:39 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Golddiggie View Post
IME, with the right burner, used the right way, the time difference you're talking about is negligible. I've been able to get more wort to a boil in my keggle than another brewer in an aluminum kettle. Two different make/model burners were used which helps to indicate how it's more burner dependent than kettle/keggle.

BTW, I don't even mind if it takes a few more minutes (if that) to heat up in my keggle compared with a thinner walled kettle. Durability of keggles is almost legendary. Thin wall kettles, not so much. As a test, kick both as hard as you can and see which one is deformed.
You are a huge advocate of keggles, which is fine but I'm trying to answer the OPs question. It's a fact that a single wall kettle will heat up faster than a keggle or multi layered kettle with all other factors the same. We've done extensive testing and would be happy to send along the raw data.

As for kicking your kettle... I don't advise anyone to kick a few hundred dollar item they purchased. If I have time tomorrow I will shoot a video though. I've personally done much worse than kicking one (dropped from the top of a pallet 10ft high) with no damage. Stainless is some tough stuff!
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Old 11-13-2012, 05:56 AM   #9
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The typical thin wall stainless you find in many kettles/pots is not as sturdy as what you find in keg construction. Even a Blichmann kettle isn't as strong.

I'm a fan/advocate of keggles due to being able to customize them 100%. Not something you can do with pretty much all other kettles I've seen. You're always locked into some configurations that you might not want.

I have my oxy acetylene torch where I live once again. So, there's tons more I can do to customize my keggles (current and future). I also have the ability to bend my own 1/2" OD stainless dip tubes. I know most brewers don't go this far into making their hardware (most just buy their stuff or do minor fabrication). I'm more of a fan of doing things that I can.

I still want to know what was meant by the original comment I posted about... "without the pain of dealing with the internal surfaces on keggles." IME, there's no difference between keggles and kettles... With the exception, maybe, that kettles [inside] are more shiny... IMO, NBD. I've shined up keggles really nice without too much effort. So the outside of a keggle can be just as finished/polished as any kettle out there.
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Hopping Tango Brewery

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On Tap: Caramel Ale, Mocha Porter II, MO SMaSH IPA
Waiting/Carbonating: 12.5% Wee Honey II, 8.9% Old Ale, English Brown Ale, Lickah ESB, Mocha Porter II
Fermenting
K1:
K2: Epic mead
K3: TripSix
On Deck: Caramel Ale
Aging:mead
Mead [bottled]:Oaked Wildflower Traditional, Mocha Madness, Blackberry Melomel, maple wine

 
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Old 11-13-2012, 06:47 AM   #10
day_trippr
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Quote:
I still want to know what was meant by the original comment I posted about... "without the pain of dealing with the internal surfaces on keggles."
I'll go out on a limb and point out the "return" at the top of the typical keggle wall that has no counterpart on a kettle. It can cause some issues, albeit minor for the most part...

Cheers!



 
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