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Old 06-17-2011, 05:46 PM   #1
SethMasterFlex
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I've been brewing a little over a year and have about 30 batches under my belt. I make hoppy beers a lot and employ a variety of schedules for my hopping needs. I enjoy in your face hoppy beers that have complexity and balance at the same time.

I've recently begun questioning flameout additions vs dry hopping if I'm already aggressively hopping a beer. I usually dry hop over flameout, but often use the two in conjunction. What differences, if any, will I achieve doing one or the other? I imagine a little more taste from the flameout and a little less aroma as it's being driven off in the primary?

I know some will respond just do both and I completely agree with this mindset. I'd just like to better understand the differences between the two. Thanks.

*edit* moved to general techniques forum as I realized it's a better fit for the topic.

 
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Old 06-17-2011, 07:27 PM   #2
SethMasterFlex
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Reported this here as I posted it in the wrong forum earlier.

I've been brewing a little over a year and have about 30 batches under my belt. I make hoppy beers a lot and employ a variety of schedules for my hopping needs. I enjoy in your face hoppy beers that have complexity and balance at the same time. I've recently begun questioning flameout additions vs dry hopping if I'm already aggressively hopping a beer. I usually dry hop over flameout, but often use the two in conjunction. What differences, if any, will I achieve doing one or the other? I imagine a little more taste from the flameout and a little less aroma as it's being driven off in the primary? I know some will respond just do both and I completely agree with this mindset. I'd just like to better understand the differences between the two. Thanks.

 
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Old 06-17-2011, 07:47 PM   #3
hatfieldenator
 
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You've kind of answered it yourself...Flameout, while the wort is still nice and hot is going to give you mostly flavor. Depending on how long you leave it in there and how hot it is you may get some aroma too. Dry hopping (after primary fermentation) is definitely for the aroma.
It sounds like you have good tastes in beer I too brew mostly hoppy IPAs and Pale Ales. I do both flame out and dry hopping. I recently purchased a hop rocket so I can start running the beer through more hops right as it enters the chiller. I'm hoping this will give me very intense flavor and a bit more aroma as well. I might end up using it after the beer is carbonated too..I was thinking of doing a keg to keg transfer and hooking up the hop rocket between the two kegs so the beer will pick up a really intense hop aroma before resting in the final serving keg.

 
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Old 06-17-2011, 08:25 PM   #4
permo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SethMasterFlex View Post
Reported this here as I posted it in the wrong forum earlier.

I've been brewing a little over a year and have about 30 batches under my belt. I make hoppy beers a lot and employ a variety of schedules for my hopping needs. I enjoy in your face hoppy beers that have complexity and balance at the same time. I've recently begun questioning flameout additions vs dry hopping if I'm already aggressively hopping a beer. I usually dry hop over flameout, but often use the two in conjunction. What differences, if any, will I achieve doing one or the other? I imagine a little more taste from the flameout and a little less aroma as it's being driven off in the primary? I know some will respond just do both and I completely agree with this mindset. I'd just like to better understand the differences between the two. Thanks.

I am in the same boat as you. I usually foregoe the flameout addition and kick up my hops between 20 and 10 minutes and rarely make an additon in the final 10 minutes any more. But I now dry hop the crap out of my hoppy ales. They have been much hoppier this way. IPA's really work well the additions at 60, 30, 20 and 10 in addition to a huge dry hop. I think a lot of the time as homebrewers we make things for too complicated. I think a good IPA could be made with addtions at 60, 15 and dry hopping.

 
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Old 06-18-2011, 12:08 AM   #5
Hammy71
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Flame out givess me the flavor of the hops...but I love the smell and zing (at least at first if you keg...) that comes from dry hopping in large amounts. Also, I do flame out hops and then whirlpool in the kettle for about 20 minutes before I start to chill.

 
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Old 06-18-2011, 01:43 AM   #6
norsk
 
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"I enjoy in your face hoppy beers that have complexity and balance at the same time." SMF

Ditto...perpetual quest of mine....that and brewing the perfect Belgian Triple

"I think a lot of the time as homebrewers we make things far too complicated. I think a good IPA could be made with addtions at 60, 15 and dry hopping." permo

Isn't that the truth....
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Old 06-20-2011, 11:36 AM   #7
Houblon
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This is a common hop timing for my APA/IPA beers
FWH - bitterness
20 min.
15 min.
10 min.
5 min.
Flameout/Whirlpool
Dry hop
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Old 06-21-2011, 06:42 AM   #8
hatfieldenator
 
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There's a pretty good article from Jamil here: Scroll down until you see "Late Hops: The Secret to Hop Aroma and Flavor" http://www.homebrewersassociation.or...free-downloads

Its from 2006, but it's pretty relevant to this discussion... Enjoy!

 
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Old 06-21-2011, 08:11 AM   #9
Vance71975
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I just did a Rye Pale Ale(100% Rye) and i hit it with 4 oz Amarillo Dry hop, I always taste before i pitch yeast as soon as it is cooled, and i noticed very little hop flavor, even tho it had two "flavor additions" at 30 and at 20 left in the boil. But i sampled as i was kegging after about 2 weeks with the dry hop in, and i noticed an INSANE amount of both Aroma and hop flavor that was not there before the dry hopping. So not to answer your question with a question but someone explain how that worked out, i was under the impression you got little to no flavor from dry hopping?
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