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Old 02-17-2007, 03:45 AM   #1
brmdavis
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Default Quick Disconnect @ regulator/distributor Question

I'm in the process of accumulating all the hardware for kegging. I think this forum singlehandedly boosed sanyo's 1st quarter profits with the 4912 bestbuy tips. I'm a proud new owner now too. Anyway, what is the benefit of having a barbed or threaded connection? When pressurizing the keg i'm assuming that once you reach the necessary pressure, the entire disconnect can be removed correct ? So why would a threaded connection be appealing to some?

Also what is your preference when running two kegs at a time, a duel regulator or a two-way air distributor? I'm thinking i might get both, using one line to run to the distributor in the fridge and using the second free regulator hose to carb a third if necessary.

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Old 02-17-2007, 03:53 AM   #2
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You don't want to pressurize and then remove the connection. You want constant pressure, so that when you pour a beer more gas can move in to offset the liquid you've lost.

Right now, my setup is barbed. I think people like threaded more because you can be assured of a tighter seal and there're no clamps to mess with. For me, barbs seem to work fine, but it's a subjective kind of thing.

As for the regulators, I have a single dual-gauge regulator with a 4-way manifold. In retrospect I think having separate regulators would have been a better road. If you have different beers that need different pressures to pour well, a dual regulator will help immensely.

It's really only a matter of time before I buy 4 secondary regulators for my 4-way manifold. It allows much more flexibility.


For instance, I had punch, homebrew, and yuengling.

Homebrew loved 12psi and poured great, but yuengling was all foam and happier at either 2-3psi or 20psi. The punch wasn't carbonated well enough unless it as at 20-25psi.

So a single regulator limits you in certain ways. I had to sit at 2-3psi while the kegerator was in use, or the yuengling would spout foam forever. If you can live with adjusting all your brews to one pressure, then you're fine. Otherwise, consider a dual for your sanyo.

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Old 02-17-2007, 04:06 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by D2T
You don't want to pressurize and then remove the connection. You want constant pressure, so that when you pour a beer more gas can move in to offset the liquid you've lost.

I meant removing the gas after pressure is achieved to prime and store not to pour. That can be done correct? Pump in some co2 and set aside until its time to drink or does the pressure have to always be there?

Also thanks for the tip on different pouring pressures, i think i might go without that for the time being as this is already becoming expensive and i'm trying to cut corners where possible. I figure i can improve it later after the wallet pain has deminished.
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Old 02-17-2007, 04:12 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brmdavis
Also thanks for the tip on different pouring pressures, i think i might go without that for the time being as this is already becoming expensive and i'm trying to cut corners where possible. I figure i can improve it later after the wallet pain has deminished.
Yeah, that was my reasoning behind the single regulator too


I'm not an expert by any means, but you should be able to remove a keg from the pressure once it's reached it's optimum CO2 saturation...but you have to make sure it reaches that. So you need to leave it on pressure for a week or so, or you can shake it around and quick carb it (never done this so not sure on the details). But once it's been sufficiently carb'd, yes, you should be able to disconnect it and be fine. I'd check it every once in a while though and re-pressurize just to make sure if it's an extended period of time.
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