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Old 12-16-2010, 05:11 PM   #1
Chaddyb
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Default fermentation temps

Okay, so I've fermented my first three batches I've done in my basement which holds a steady 64-66° in warmer months. Now that its winter here, and below zero, the basement stays around 54 °, so I'm assuming that's too cool for ale yeasts. My second option would be to term on the main level which is kept at 68°, but is that getting too warm once the yeast get to work? Another option would be to put it into an upstairs closet that is generally a few degrees cooler, maybe bout 65°...

Oh yeah the yeast I'm using is wyeast 3068 if it matters.

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Old 12-16-2010, 05:19 PM   #2
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A 54F basement is a perfect environment for fermenting Lagers! I would embrace the seasonal temperature swing and brew some Pilseners and Lagers while you have the chance.

After fermentation is complete, the only other requirement would be to have a fridge or cooler that is capable of going down to around freezing for a few weeks of cold aging.

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Old 12-16-2010, 05:29 PM   #3
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68 is a perfect temp for ale yeast! it might rise a few degrees inside the fermentor from the crazy yeast orgy but its noot really problematic. you could also wrap it in a wet towel to help keeps temps down around 70.

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Old 12-16-2010, 05:29 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nebben View Post
A 54F basement is a perfect environment for fermenting Lagers! I would embrace the seasonal temperature swing and brew some Pilseners and Lagers while you have the chance.
But not with that yeast. I'd opt for fermenting in a swamp cooler (not in the basement).
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Old 12-16-2010, 06:14 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Shinglejohn View Post
68 is a perfect temp for ale yeast! it might rise a few degrees inside the fermentor from the crazy yeast orgy but its noot really problematic. you could also wrap it in a wet towel to help keeps temps down around 70.
what about 61 for bastment
and 40 freg
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Old 12-16-2010, 06:23 PM   #6
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I've tried 3068 in the lower 60's and was not impressed. It just didn't have the esters it should have had. In your situation I would start it at 65 and after it peaks move it to the room that holds at 68.

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Old 12-16-2010, 07:50 PM   #7
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I'm jealous, with those low temperatures in my basement I'd stock up on some Saflager S-23 Dry Lager Yeast, Wyeast 2007 - Pilsen Lager™, Wyeast 2206 - Bavarian Lager or Saflager W-34/70 and brew nothing but lagers until spring!

I'm actually doing that now but I need frozen water bottles and a fermentation chamber to hit the 50F temperature.

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Old 12-17-2010, 01:57 AM   #8
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I'm jealous, with those low temperatures in my basement I'd stock up on some Saflager S-23 Dry Lager Yeast, Wyeast 2007 - Pilsen Lager™, Wyeast 2206 - Bavarian Lager or Saflager W-34/70 and brew nothing but lagers until spring!

I'm actually doing that now but I need frozen water bottles and a fermentation chamber to hit the 50F temperature.

I'm pretty new to brewing, but I do eventually wanna do some lagers, eventually . . .
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Old 12-17-2010, 06:39 AM   #9
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I'm pretty new to brewing, but I do eventually wanna do some lagers, eventually . . .
Man, don't wait!!! I put off learning to lager for about 5 years for various reasons, but mainly I thought I didn't know enough. It turns out it's almost exactly the same, just takes longer. Brew up a marzen, pils, vienna, whatever, just make the most of what you're given. Buy a couple ale pails, use a growler to make starters from smack packs, and do them just like an ale, but leave them in your basement. At those temps, with wyeast 2206 they're fire and forget. When you notice that the airlock isn't bubbling move the buckets to the garage/fridge/where ever it's between 32 and 40 and leave them there for a month or two or three. When that's done keg and enjoy.
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Old 12-17-2010, 12:54 PM   #10
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I agree with trigger. Brewing lagers isn't really a mystical thing that one really needs to avoid for a long time while they build up their experience.

Some keys I've learned is to boil 90min (if AG) and take the D rest seriously at the end of fermentation. Otherwise, as long as you have ~50F available for a couple weeks and ~32-33F available for several more weeks, you are ready for lagers. I am still arguing this because some people go to great lengths to build and obtain equipment just to make these, when you have the environment and season that is perfect already for it.

Have fun!

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