When to brew my second beer

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JLP

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I pitched the yeast on a Pumpkin Ale with WLP008 Wednesday, and it is fermenting at 68 in my fermentation chamber. I want to brew a Session IPA with WLP090, but I want to ferment it at 67 with a pitching temp of 57. With it being 80 degrees outside right now will I be able to put the Pumpkin in my closet yet? I've not checked the FG, but there is still activity in the blow off tube. I am assuming that it is still high so I don't want to create temp related off flavors. I don't want to stall out the Pumpkin by dropping the temp either. Should I put the SIPA on hold?
 

jekeane

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I wouldn't change the temp on the pumpkin for at least 5 days to a week. I wouldn't even check the gravity for 5 days.
 

LesIsMore

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Well, after a couple days, most of the flavor compounds would have been produced, so I wouldn't be too concerned with taking it some place warmer. In fact, I've gotten into the habit of always increasing the temp as fermentation slows down. If you're concerned about high temperatures, you always have the option of putting the pumpkin in a water bath to keep the temp from getting too high.
 

kh54s10

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You have the present beer at 68 degrees, you want the next at 67 degrees. But you want to pitch at 58 degrees?? Why? The difference between the 2 is insignificant. I would just get the next one started. If you want put the new one in the chamber at 68 or 67, wait until the wort is that temp then pitch.

Plus 57 is really cold. Many ale yeasts would go dormant at that temperature.

Brew the new beer, get the temperature close to 67 degrees, and proceed.
 
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JLP

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You have the present beer at 68 degrees, you want the next at 67 degrees. But you want to pitch at 58 degrees?? Why? The difference between the 2 is insignificant. I would just get the next one started. If you want put the new one in the chamber at 68 or 67, wait until the wort is that temp then pitch.

Plus 57 is really cold. Many ale yeasts would go dormant at that temperature.

Brew the new beer, get the temperature close to 67 degrees, and proceed.
By pitching colder and keeping it colder during the lag phase it slows down the reproduction phase. From there when you set the fermentation fridge to the desired ferm temp you just let it go and naturally rise. This technique allows the yeast more time to acclimate to the environment, allows for a better fermentation, and keeps the ester production down. It is a really great technique for Big American beers. Since this is going to be a sessionable ale in the 4% range, and no malts to hide the any issues behind I want to be on the safe side and use the same techniques.

I cannot add it into the same ferm chamber as my Pumpkin Ale right now, as the fridge temp has the potential to get down to freezing to bring down the IPA's temp. That would affect my Pumpkin Ale, as it is finishing up. It will not be producing the same temps. I normally brew two beers in one day, and put the thermometer on the most important beer to avoid any of these issues.

My only option I guess would be to pull out the pumpkin and give it an ice bath or a wet shirt as LesIsMore recommended...
 

kh54s10

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By pitching colder and keeping it colder during the lag phase it slows down the reproduction phase. From there when you set the fermentation fridge to the desired ferm temp you just let it go and naturally rise. This technique allows the yeast more time to acclimate to the environment, allows for a better fermentation, and keeps the ester production down. It is a really great technique for Big American beers. Since this is going to be a sessionable ale in the 4% range, and no malts to hide the any issues behind I want to be on the safe side and use the same techniques.

I cannot add it into the same ferm chamber as my Pumpkin Ale right now, as the fridge temp has the potential to get down to freezing to bring down the IPA's temp. That would affect my Pumpkin Ale, as it is finishing up. It will not be producing the same temps. I normally brew two beers in one day, and put the thermometer on the most important beer to avoid any of these issues.

My only option I guess would be to pull out the pumpkin and give it an ice bath or a wet shirt as LesIsMore recommended...
I have only been brewing for about 3 years. This is the first I have ever heard about starting fermentation so low. It may work but seems like going a bit overboard to me... It also seems to me pitching the yeast so cold would stress them and give negative results??

As to the pumpkin ale, if it is almost finished why not just pull it out of the chamber, keep as cool as possible, or not, and proceed with the next brew?
 
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I have only been brewing for about 3 years. This is the first I have ever heard about starting fermentation so low. It may work but seems like going a bit overboard to me... It also seems to me pitching the yeast so cold would stress them and give negative results??

As to the pumpkin ale, if it is almost finished why not just pull it out of the chamber, keep as cool as possible, or not, and proceed with the next brew?
I've only been at it for two and a half, but none the less I have brewed about 5 or 6 beers with this technique. They have come out great. I stumbled on this technique as I was getting ready to brew my first big beer for a club barrel project, and I was scared of being that one dude who screwed up. I then read on to several other places stating that it works. I only do a 10 degree difference from the desired ferm temp, and not the full 50 degrees. There is no stress on the yeast for the 12 to 24 hour lag period. I will suggest that you ensure that you have great sanitation.

http://www.maltosefalcons.com/tech/thinking-big-getting-handle-brewing-big-beers
 

Piratwolf

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If you've pitched enough yeast in your pumpkin beer for healthy fermentation and it's been fermenting since last Wednesday, you can absolutely pull it out now. The off-flavor period is long gone and warming your beer will only help finish fermentation.

As for the low-temp pitch, I can see why it's important in a big beer. However, that approach is overkill for a small beer--it lacks the all-yeast-can-eat amount of sugars that are in a big beer, and if you've mashed high for your session IPA to get more mouthfeel AND you start the yeast too low your fermentation may be sluggish and under attenuated.


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