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What temp and duration do you hopstand?

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Ninoid

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I have made a no bittering addition IPA once and felt it peculiarly missing the bitter. Now I use 1/4-1/2 oz of hops for bittering to get me around 15-20 IBUs and load up at the end. It seems just about perfect to me with a small bittering addition.
Next time I plan something like that because I see that only the hopstand does not provide satisfying bitterness for a longer time.
 

Conehead

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Has anyone done it brewing a Pilsner? I did it with my Helles and it is still in the fermenter. 1 oz. of Saaz at 170 F. I didn't pause the chiller, just left it on.
 

Dgallo

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Has anyone done it brewing a Pilsner? I did it with my Helles and it is still in the fermenter. 1 oz. of Saaz at 170 F. I didn't pause the chiller, just left it on.
Not a Pilsner but I did it to a saison and it came out great. I would say any beer you’d like hop presence with lower bitterness.
 

Clyde McCoy

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I’m with you here. My hop stands are at 150 and I hold the temp within 5 degrees for 90 minutes.

I read an article where they conducted a comparable study of total hop oil content in beers and the perceived flavor impact numerous whirlpool and dry hopping schedules. all beers had the same water profile, grain bill, hops, yeast and fermentation temp. Each beer was hopped at a rate of 2 oz per gallon in total hopping. For example. One beer was 40% whirlpool at 160 for 30 minutes and 60% dryhops at 3 days before kegging. The dry hops ranged from 5 day to 1 day before keg. The whirlpools were a little more involved they ranged in temps from 180-130 and from 30-90 minutes.

The combo that had the most oil content was the 70% whirlpool at 170 for 90 minutes 30% at day 5. However the combo that was chosen to have the greatest perceived flavor and was the most preferred from the blind tasting was the 50% whirlpool at 150 for 90 minutes and 50% dryhop 2 days before kegging.

Did anyone else read this study? I can’t seem to find the link.
Do you know the reference for this? Sounds like a good read.
 

Dgallo

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Clyde McCoy

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I believe this was the one I was referencing here;

Edit* actually I don’t think this was it but it was very similar to this one, so I’m thinking the one I was referencing was conducted by them too
Thanks for posting this, enjoyed it. These two (much) smaller experiments interestingly came to the same conclusion in regards to maximizing flavor: flameout + 10' rest.



I haven't personally tested this enough to comment.

Edit - Lawson's recipe is flameout + 30' rest.
 
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