used metal fittings to weigh down hop bag

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jack13

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I've had really bad oxidation problems in the past, but that I appear to have solved by switching to RO water (my tap water had 8x the max level of iron that's acceptable for brewing).

In my last brew, I absent-mindedly used metal fittings to weigh down my hop bags for dry hopping. One of them appears to be bronze, and the other seems to be steel, which if it is of course contains iron. One was in for 3 days, the other 6. Not sure which was which. I've never done this before, and in the future will use marbles or something.

The one I think is steel is the piece that connects to the hose in the false bottom in my mash tun. Here's a link to it:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004B7GIV8/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20

Note: it is silver in color. the bronze/gold color in the picture must be a lighting issue.

My history with iron/oxidation problems makes my mistake especially worrying to me--and especially stupid.

There's not a damn thing I can do now (bottled two days ago), but just figured I'd see if anyone did this before, or has an opinion on the odds that my error will increase iron levels in my beer significantly.
 
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seatazzz

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I once used what I *thought* was a stainless steel ball (what we old un's used to call "steelies" when we played marbles on the playground) only to find it was NOT stainless and gave the beer a lovely "rust" flavor (NOT lovely). Your best bet is using marbles or heavy glassware to weigh down hop sacks. I've even used a smooth rock I found in my yard, scrubbed up and boiled, that worked better.
 

ParabolicDestination

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I would try to use a piece of copper pipe or rod. Copper in the boil has been said to increase yeast nutrient. https://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=202743 mentions it. There are a few more threads on HBT about it also. Even if it is for just the weight, doesn't hurt to help the yeasties while you're at it. I have copper dip tubes in all my kettles/keggles and never had a problem with off flavors like you can get with some other metals.
 

thehaze

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I vote for glass marbles, preferably those without any color pigment added. They are pretty cheap and easy to work with. Depending on size, 4-5 marbles should do the trick. More, if you use leaf or a larger dry hop charge.
 

kh54s10

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My guess is that you won't have problems from either.

I don't use anything to weigh down the hop bag. I push it under the surface with the back end of my spoon. (sanitized) It floats but right at the surface so all of the hops are in the beer.
 
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jack13

jack13

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Thanks, all. To clarify, I had no plans to ever use the fittings again for this purpose, and had I given it a moment's thought I'd have grabbed any other of a dozen non-metal stuff I've got (like a shotglass-good idea!).

I'll try to remember to post here later to report if I had any problems from this, just in case anyone is curious...
 

tmendick

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There is no reason a metal fitting would cause oxidation (assuming you're using stainless). If there was, we wouldn't be using stainless fermenters on the professional level. I usually use an old stainless npt to barb fitting that was part of my brewstand before I got cam locks, I've noticed no oxidation difference.
 
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jack13

jack13

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There is no reason a metal fitting would cause oxidation (assuming you're using stainless). If there was, we wouldn't be using stainless fermenters on the professional level. I usually use an old stainless npt to barb fitting that was part of my brewstand before I got cam locks, I've noticed no oxidation difference.
It doesn't seem to be stainless. But I'm only basing that on the fact that it's rough, rather than smooth and shiny.
 

skidmark

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That barb fitting should be stainless if it's the one in the link. The matte finish body is the raw casting.
 

Anon111

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Thanks, all. To clarify, I had no plans to ever use the fittings again for this purpose, and had I given it a moment's thought I'd have grabbed any other of a dozen non-metal stuff I've got (like a shotglass-good idea!).

I'll try to remember to post here later to report if I had any problems from this, just in case anyone is curious...
Not all good ideas are failproof...
 
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jack13

jack13

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Hi All,

FWIW, using those metal fittings to weigh down my hop bags did not seem to have led to oxidation, as most (or maybe all) surmised! Once again got good info at HBT.

This beer (IPA) turned out very good. Consumed this batch faster than any other, actually.
 

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