Quantcast

To carbonate or not to carbonate... Irish Stout

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

mikefranciotti

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2008
Messages
116
Reaction score
0
Location
Long Island, NY
I brewed an all extract Irish Stout a few weeks ago and bottled last night. I love Guinness and must say, my Irish Stout tasted very similar.

After priming/bottling, I sampled what was left in the bottling bucket. Wow I kind of wished I hadn't primed the batch... Maybe done 50/50 prime/no prime.

My question is, if I were to make this again and bottle w/o priming, will the brew get better with age having done nothing?
 

llazy_llama

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2009
Messages
2,832
Reaction score
92
Location
Rapid City, South Dakota
What your beer tastes like flat with priming sugar mixed in, and what your beer tastes like after ~3 weeks bottle conditioning at 70 degrees are two very different things. Wait until it's time to drink them, then you'll probably think a bit differently about wanting to make flat beer.
 
OP
M

mikefranciotti

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2008
Messages
116
Reaction score
0
Location
Long Island, NY
Yea to clarify, I want to make it smooth like Guinness... I know nitrogen is used to prime Guinness but at this point I've got no clue how to do that. Figured maybe this was an easy trial/error.
 

ChshreCat

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2008
Messages
11,520
Reaction score
579
Location
Camano Island
Guinness is carbonated. Leaving your beer flat won't make it more like Guinness, IMHO.
 

llazy_llama

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2009
Messages
2,832
Reaction score
92
Location
Rapid City, South Dakota
Really, the only way you're going to get that perfect creamy head is to keg, and use beergas (usually about 75% CO2/25% Nitrogen) to dispense. You can also keg and use a special stout faucet to get nearly the same effect. Bottling it, it's never going to be 100% perfect, but you can get pretty close.
 
OP
M

mikefranciotti

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2008
Messages
116
Reaction score
0
Location
Long Island, NY
Point taken guys. Thanks for the quick advice.

Once the money starts rolling in more steadily, I'll probably invest in kegging.
 

pompeiisneaks

Why that human mask?
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jan 7, 2009
Messages
889
Reaction score
53
Location
Redmond
BUT I think if I recall, I heard in the past somewhere that in england anyway, they often used to serve ale at room temp and not very carbed at all. Not sure what bearing that has, but I often taste my samples after fermentation w/o any real carbing and they taste great at 72ish degrees.... my 2c's :p
 

flyangler18

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2008
Messages
5,559
Reaction score
43
Location
Hanover, PA
The level of carbonation matters immensely; too much carbonation in a stout, and you're left with something watery and biting (from the carbonic acid).

How much priming sugar did you use?
 

carnevoodoo

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 17, 2007
Messages
4,258
Reaction score
24
Location
San Diego, CA
BUT I think if I recall, I heard in the past somewhere that in england anyway, they often used to serve ale at room temp and not very carbed at all. Not sure what bearing that has, but I often taste my samples after fermentation w/o any real carbing and they taste great at 72ish degrees.... my 2c's :p
You're talking about real ale, and that is waaaay different than flat beer. You should read up on it. Pretty good stuff.
 

SumnerH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2009
Messages
2,057
Reaction score
44
Location
Alexandria, VA, USA
Fun with online tools!

The Beer Recipator - Home has a carbonation calculator. Click on it.

In the first dropdown, I picked "Irish Dry Stout" for the style, and it said 1.6-2.0 volumes is normal for that style.

So in the next box I put 1.8 volumes of CO2 as desired. I left "bottle priming" checked, and I entered 5 gallons of beer at a temperature of 65F. Then I click on "Corn sugar" (click it even if it's already checked).

It says: 2.40 oz of corn sugar are needed to carbonate appropriately for the style.
If I pick cane sugar, it recommends 2.28 oz.
 

Revvy

Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Dec 11, 2007
Messages
41,308
Reaction score
3,672
Location
"Detroitish" Michigan
A totally uncarbed beer isn't very good, you need some amount of carbonation.
+1

According beersmith, carbing a dry stout to style you would aim for between 1.8 and 2.5 volumes of co2. to bottle it (at 68 degrees) you would be using between 2.52 and 4.39 ounces of corn sugar. So obviously you would probably want to be carbing at the low end for your batches if you like it that way.
 

JimmyS

New Member
Joined
May 6, 2017
Messages
3
Reaction score
1
How much should you use? Sorry, I was trying to refrain from posting and just reading to answer my questions I don't want to hijack someones thread but this one is a cliff hanger, Im getting ready to brew my first AG Irish stout and do not want to over or under carbonate. I need to know. Thanks in advance.
 
Top