Time for a New All-In-One Brewing System

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WannaB1

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My 3-year-old 120V Grainfather Connect finally melted the controller plug. I was already contemplating the Grainfather G70 but apparently, there are some issues that they seem unable to fix?

I know I want to go 220V
I love simplicity and the easier they are to clean the better
5.5 and 11 gallon batches
I also really do like the delayed heating feature but not a deal breaker.
Being able to repair/replace bad parts seems important at the moment.

I'm considering the G70, Brewzilla 65L, Spike Solo, and even considering an eHERMS 3V system for sale locally but I have no idea if that is more trouble than it's worth.

What am I missing? I saw the brewtools and apparently, they aren't intended for dummies and I am a self-proclaimed DA.
 

Sammy86

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I can't recommend the Brewzilla more highly! The main complaint I've seen is some people don't think the boil is rigorous enough but I have the neoprene jacket and I'm boiling a gallon/hour.

The other thing is the controller is low which is a PIA but you set it up on something a little higher off the ground and you're good to go!
 
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WannaB1

WannaB1

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I can't recommend the Brewzilla more highly! The main complaint I've seen is some people don't think the boil is rigorous enough but I have the neoprene jacket and I'm boiling a gallon/hour.

The other thing is the controller is low which is a PIA but you set it up on something a little higher off the ground and you're good to go!
Thanks! I'm really having a hard time deciding between the spike solo and the Brewzilla. I'm leaning a little toward the Brewzilla and getting the Steam Lid from Spike, but I feel like maybe the spike will outlast my brewing days if I get it. It's kinda a big purchase for me so I'll overthink it.
 

Carolina_Matt

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There are a lot of options at various price points. I think part of the decision is figuring out which attributes are useful to you, and which aren't. I BIAB and don't need bells and whistles, so the Digiboil works for me. Other people have different expectations that justify spending a lot more.

The one feature I'd like on the Digiboil is the ability to turn on the element at a specified time so that the water is at strike temperature when I wake up, although the easy way around it is to just turn on the 500W element the night before. It's not expensive or dangerous to have 500W maintaining temperature. Aside from that, it works great for me. But some people want other features that warrant addition expense.

So in your case, what are you looking for?
 
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WannaB1

WannaB1

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I don't mind spending the money on a quality unit but I'm not looking to spend money for the sake of spending money.

I think I've ruled out the G70, and it was the unit I had every intention of buying.
The Brewtools unit is nice but with the complexity and price I would just buy the local 3V system.
Brewzilla seems to be the best value and I read the 15 gallon steam lid from Spike works on it so it's a strong contender.
The Spike Solo was the next unit I had decided to buy after ruling out the G70. Looking at the info on it I keep reading about scorched elements and It kinda scares me.

I just don't want to buy a unit and the next day/week/month realize I overlooked the obvious best unit available.
 

stealthfixr

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I am a BIAB brewer using a 110V RIMS for mashing and propane for big temp changes & boiling, and I am also considering a AIO system for simplicity and to move brewing indoors. I am settled mostly on the Brewzilla 65L for it's cost/value and ability to do 10gal batches on occasion. However, I am also drawn by the Brewtools B40 Pro--expensive and only 5gal batch size, but so nice.
 
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I don't mind spending the money on a quality unit but I'm not looking to spend money for the sake of spending money.

I think I've ruled out the G70, and it was the unit I had every intention of buying.
The Brewtools unit is nice but with the complexity and price I would just buy the local 3V system.
Brewzilla seems to be the best value and I read the 15 gallon steam lid from Spike works on it so it's a strong contender.
The Spike Solo was the next unit I had decided to buy after ruling out the G70. Looking at the info on it I keep reading about scorched elements and It kinda scares me.

I just don't want to buy a unit and the next day/week/month realize I overlooked the obvious best unit available.
No worries on the scorched element! We've only had a handful of incidents with hundreds of units sold. The issue happens when the grain bed gets stuck and the pump continues to run draining the bottom of the kettle. Proper crush, setting of the grain bed, etc makes this a non-issue. It usually happens on someone's first brew day when they are learning the system and maybe not paying that close of attention. I can assure you it's nothing to be concerned about and can happen on any system when used incorrectly.
 

NewJersey

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I'd go solo. Everything is non-proprietary.
Spike solo is the opposite of all the cheaper all in ones or blichmann in that regard.
It's more expensive, but definitely worth it for the quality imo
 
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WannaB1

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OK I'll more than likely go with the Solo, love the non-proprietary, and the quality is top-notch. Funny, I almost ordered the Solo cyber Monday but thought meh the Grainfather is still doing its job, very next brew it melted the controller.

I have a couple of CF5 fermenters from Spike and they are great, reached out to support on an issue (that turned out was me) and they were very helpful so that does mean a lot.
 

RufusBrewer

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You can build a system around the Blichmann Brewcommander. Brewhardware.com can fix you up with the rest of you kit.

Or go for some some of the many options available from Auber Instruments.

Depends on if you are looking for a turnkey system.
 

brewman !

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See Thing1 in my sig.

The induction heater instructions are here:
 
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Aerohead93

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See Thing1 in my sig.

The induction heater instructions are here:
My 3-year-old 120V Grainfather Connect finally melted the controller plug. I was already contemplating the Grainfather G70 but apparently, there are some issues that they seem unable to fix?

I know I want to go 220V
I love simplicity and the easier they are to clean the better
5.5 and 11 gallon batches
I also really do like the delayed heating feature but not a deal breaker.
Being able to repair/replace bad parts seems important at the moment.

I'm considering the G70, Brewzilla 65L, Spike Solo, and even considering an eHERMS 3V system for sale locally but I have no idea if that is more trouble than it's worth.

What am I missing? I saw the brewtools and apparently, they aren't intended for dummies and I am a self-proclaimed DA.
So looking at the near $2200 Solo with pump and chiller, that at most can brew a 10 gallon batch size, why would you not consider the Brewtools B80? Minimum boil size is 8 gallons max is 21 gallons. It comes in at $1949 with a pump. Add the chiller and you are around the same price point as the Solo with quite a bit more system and loads of good support from Brewtools. I have a B80 and on delivery day it didn’t show up so I freaked out and emailed Brewtools! I am not joking when I tell you that I got a reassuring email back from them within 1 minute! I have yet to brew a batch on it yet but I can tell you their quality is second to none! IMHO, there is nothing about the Brewtools systems that is hard to figure out. It’s just different and there will be a learning curve like there is with any new system. Give em another look and if you haven’t, go watch some YouTube videos by The Portly Gentleman. He does a great job lining everything out and explaining it. It’s the next best thing to test driving it! Cheers!
 
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WannaB1

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So looking at the near $2200 Solo with pump and chiller, that at most can brew a 10 gallon batch size, why would you not consider the Brewtools B80? Minimum boil size is 8 gallons max is 21 gallons. It comes in at $1949 with a pump. Add the chiller and you are around the same price point as the Solo with quite a bit more system and loads of good support from Brewtools. I have a B80 and on delivery day it didn’t show up so I freaked out and emailed Brewtools! I am not joking when I tell you that I got a reassuring email back from them within 1 minute! I have yet to brew a batch on it yet but I can tell you their quality is second to none! IMHO, there is nothing about the Brewtools systems that is hard to figure out. It’s just different and there will be a learning curve like there is with any new system. Give em another look and if you haven’t, go watch some YouTube videos by The Portly Gentleman. He does a great job lining everything out and explaining it. It’s the next best thing to test driving it! Cheers!
I did give Brewtools a good look and my cart right now is 3266 for the B80, steam hat, condenser, and 3 valves set up. And I guess there will be an additional import fee?

That's a good chunk of change for me, again I would pay that if I knew what I was getting was the hands-down superior system. It's nice and I'm sure it's a great setup just hadn't been able to find the info out there to justify it, Yet. I'll research it more this weekend.
 

Aerohead93

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I did give Brewtools a good look and my cart right now is 3266 for the B80, steam hat, condenser, and 3 valves set up. And I guess there will be an additional import fee?

That's a good chunk of change for me, again I would pay that if I knew what I was getting was the hands-down superior system. It's nice and I'm sure it's a great setup just hadn't been able to find the info out there to justify it, Yet. I'll research it more this weekend.
I was simply trying to compare apples to apples and go with a comparable system to the Solo if you pick all of the add-one they offer (pump, chiller etc.) There is the pesky VAT import tax for sure. But you don’t pay for shipping for that price. So here is something that is pretty cool. The folks at brewtools are working on a mash rake/recirc/ sparge device for the systems. They released a teaser video of it the other day. These guys are always innovating. Anyway, good luck on your journey! Cheers!!!
 

NewJersey

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I just gave the brewtools stuff a better look and it's pretty impressive. Lots is proprietary pieces tho. The b40 not offering 5k+ 240v is a HUGE letdown
 

Rik van den berg

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I did give Brewtools a good look and my cart right now is 3266 for the B80, steam hat, condenser, and 3 valves set up. And I guess there will be an additional import fee?

That's a good chunk of change for me, again I would pay that if I knew what I was getting was the hands-down superior system. It's nice and I'm sure it's a great setup just hadn't been able to find the info out there to justify it, Yet. I'll research it more this weekend.
The brew tools looks slick for sure. It does seem to have the same problem some of the cheaper systems do like internal pump and non-standard heating elements. What happens when something breaks? Can they be replaced? And if they can, do you try to get ahold of some dudes in Norway?

great thing about Unibräu, Clawhammer, spike so far is that they’ve been super responsive (within minutes) to questions and are right here in North America. And they use parts that can be replaced easily when they break.
 

Aerohead93

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I just gave the brewtools stuff a better look and it's pretty impressive. Lots is proprietary pieces tho. The b40 not offering 5k+ 240v is a HUGE letdown
Ya I have heard that the steam hat and condenser are almost a must for that system. I went with the B80 because I can make a 6 gallon batch or a 20 gallon batch and obviously anything in between. The bonus being the higher wattage option. As far as the proprietary TC fittings, that is probably one of the more talked about aspects from a negative standpoint. But from what I understand, that size was chosen after many trials of the system with different sized fittings. It may be all bull crap, but that would make sense. The other thing I like is pretty much everything in the system can be replaced by the Brewer! And there is so much modularity to it that you can configure it any way you want. As I had said in my previous reply, these guys are constantly innovating and coming up with new features. And a lot of those new features come from feedback from their customers and prospective buyers. If they can do it, they will (within reason of course). Anyway, at the end of the day I am thrilled with our B80 and I’m really excited for the things to come! Cheers!
 

brewman !

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So what is so great about the Brewtools M80 that it sells for $2200 ? I don't get it.

First thing I don't understand about these all in ones is are they supposed to stand on the floor or sit on the counter ? Because they look too short to stand on the floor and too tall to be on a counter. Given where the control panel is, you kind of have to put it on the counter. But then lifting the grain basket out must be a pain ???

I applaud them for finally having an element that isn't from a water heater sticking straight out into the middle of the mash.

I don't understand this confluence of valves.

I also don't like the pump ports being under the mash. Every time you disconnect a hose you have to shut a valve and deal with leakage. With Thing1, Grainfather, etc. you have a standpipe that goes up to the top of the kettle. As soon as you shut off the pump, the fluid drains down. You can thus change hoses with no dribbling.

Each to their own.
 
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NewJersey

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Ya I have heard that the steam hat and condenser are almost a must for that system. I went with the B80 because I can make a 6 gallon batch or a 20 gallon batch and obviously anything in between. The bonus being the higher wattage option. As far as the proprietary TC fittings, that is probably one of the more talked about aspects from a negative standpoint. But from what I understand, that size was chosen after many trials of the system with different sized fittings. It may be all bull crap, but that would make sense. The other thing I like is pretty much everything in the system can be replaced by the Brewer! And there is so much modularity to it that you can configure it any way you want. As I had said in my previous reply, these guys are constantly innovating and coming up with new features. And a lot of those new features come from feedback from their customers and prospective buyers. If they can do it, they will (within reason of course). Anyway, at the end of the day I am thrilled with our B80 and I’m really excited for the things to come! Cheers!
Yeah, but everything is not swappable at all. The screen and pump are built into the unit. Temp probe and heating elements are proprietary. That's the kinda stuff people should be avoiding if they want a long haul kinda system.
 

NewJersey

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So what is so great about the Brewtools M80 that it sells for $2200 ? I don't get it.

First thing I don't understand about these all in ones is are they supposed to stand on the floor or sit on the counter ? Because they look too short to stand on the floor and too tall to be on a counter. Given where the control panel is, you kind of have to put it on the counter. But then lifting the grain basket out must be a pain ???

I applaud them for finally having an element that isn't from a water heater sticking straight out into the middle of the mash.

I don't understand this confluence of valves.

I also don't like the pump ports being under the mash. Every time you disconnect a hose you have to shut a valve and deal with leakage. With Thing1, Grainfather, etc. you have a standpipe that goes up to the top of the kettle. As soon as you shut off the pump, the fluid drains down. You can thus change hoses with no dribbling.

Each to their own.
I know what "thing 1" is because I spend WAY too much time on HBT, but most people aren't gonna have any idea about what your homebuilt setup is just by what you named it, lol
 
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WannaB1

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Yeah, but everything is not swappable at all. The screen and pump are built into the unit. Temp probe and heating elements are proprietary. That's the kinda stuff people should be avoiding if they want a long haul kinda system.
These are the reasons I've removed it from my list. It's a neat unit with several things that I wish other units had but you can't have it all I reckon'.
 

NewJersey

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These are the reasons I've removed it from my list. It's a neat unit with several things that I wish other units had but you can't have it all I reckon'.
I think it looks really cool as well, I just wouldn't buy it. 1.339" tc is weird. And I don't like the built in 3-way valve. I don't see how it's an improvement for the end user. It feels like something an engineer was like, "hey guys we could do this" and then nobody questioned the "why" and it went into production. Controlling pump flow on the screen only is also a con in my book. It's good in so many ways but also misses.
The b40 having a 12 gallon pot is GREAT as 10 gallon can be tight for biab on bigger beers for 5.5 gallon finished batches.
A lot of guys on here are ok with 20 gallon pots cuz they "might brew 10+ gallons". I won't, so the smallest that fits my needs is best.
I understand these were designed in Norway and aren't meant for our market, but things constantly being listed in mm and liters instead of inches and gallons is annoying. And this is on their USA only site!
It will be interesting to see where the all in one market moves in the coming years.
I see the appeal in 110v throwaways like the Anvil, the modular solo, or the very cool but quirky brewtools.
 

brewman !

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Yeah, but everything is not swappable at all. The screen and pump are built into the unit. Temp probe and heating elements are proprietary. That's the kinda stuff people should be avoiding if they want a long haul kinda system.
A touchscreen under a pot of boiling wort. What could go wrong ? Is it rated IP67 ? Or would an accidental splash kill it ?

Think you can get a new one in 5 years ? That controller is the heart of the system and if you can't get a replacement unit, you are going to have to rewire the entire thing. Including the proprietary 24VDC pump.

I find controlling a pump from a touchscreen to be a pain. I was using CraftBrewPi on Thing1. It got old real quick. Logging temps was nice, watching temps from another room was nice, but it was too finicky. Now I use a switch (!) and a PID.

I don't get the off size tri clamp fittings either. They probably work for the European market, but would be a complete hassle in the US. Are the fittings NPT or something metric ?

The Brewtool accessories are really expensive.

I like stainless steel and triclamps, but why do home brewing systems need 20 triclamp fittings and accessories, on the hot process ? I get using triclamp stuff on fermenters, where everything needs to be sanitary. But with boiling wort ?

Copper conducts heat 20x better than SS. So why are half the home brew chillers out there made of SS ?

I guess I'm just old fashioned. SMH.
 

brewman !

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"We've made a pump extension cable that allows for flexible placement of the pump. For professionals or users that want maximum serviceability if a blockage occurs this is a great option. It also enables some fancy pipework."

96584359_2628983927428313_5102662496959183654_n.jpg


95869907_2647518848820410_3005392784400373642_n.jpg


Notice the lack of strain relief and water proofing on the pump power cable.

That is a lot of pipe to draw wort off the bottom of a mash tun and return it to the top of the mash. But hey, it looks so pretty !

What is this talk about "blockage" ? Can you imagine the mess if you had to break apart that setup if it blocked during a mash ? Did you notice that the Brewtools all in ones come complete with 2 drip trays ?

I accidentally fed my chugger pump some whole corriander seed before Christmas ! LOL. Kept right on chugging. I should check the impeller ! LOL.

I wonder if that pump is custom to BrewTools ? I don't like single source equipment.
 

Aerohead93

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Some of what you guys are saying is not correct. EVERYTHING on the Brewtools systems can be replaced! There is nothing that can’t be pulled out and replaced or pulled apart and cleaned including the pump and center valve. The pump does not pull from the center of the kettle. It pulls from an adjustable dip tube inside the kettle. The pump is an off-the-shelf and non-proprietary Topsflo 24VDC. These pumps are used in a lot of systems. The pictures that Brewman ! has posted are of a pretty extreme setup that is far from the norm. IMO that’s part of what drew me to the Brewtools is the modularity of their systems. If someone was worried about the controller being in harms way, it can be detached and moved to a different location. The chiller is an add-on accessory (like it is on a lot of systems out there) so you can integrate whatever you like. The drip trays are also add on accessories. I personally think they are a nice addition. As far as the TC fittings subject: yes the fittings are a bit of a head scratcher on the surface when it comes to the size. But, like I said before, I believe it was a decision that was made to optimize the performance of the system. But I really don’t know for sure. As far as TC fittings on the hot side of things; I personally would take TC over NPT any day! I have taken apart threaded hot side fittings before and have been amazed at what I have found. And I’m a little anal when it comes to cleaning so it isn’t as if I neglected the process. Hot side or not, I don’t think it’s a good thing. There is a reason Breweries use them pretty much exclusively.
At the end of the day, the best system is one that you can live with price-wise and feature wise.
I don’t think that coming on here posting things that aren’t 100% accurate is a good way to express your opinion about something. I simply posted about the Brewtools systems to give a different perspective and not once did I give misleading or inaccurate information. I’m not trying to be an a$$, but more people than me read these posts and I don’t think it’s right to give inaccurate information. All the factual information is out there. To the OP, good luck in your search for a new system. It can be stressful but also fun and rewarding at the same time! Cheers!
 

brewman !

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Some of what you guys are saying is not correct. EVERYTHING on the Brewtools systems can be replaced!
Sure it can. Provided BrewTools stays in business and keeps selling the parts. What happens when they don't ?

Is that control IP67 rated ? How much is it to replace when it fails ?

There is nothing that can’t be pulled out and replaced or pulled apart and cleaned including the pump and center valve. The pump does not pull from the center of the kettle. It pulls from an adjustable dip tube inside the kettle.
Yipee.

The pump is an off-the-shelf and non-proprietary Topsflo 24VDC. These pumps are used in a lot of systems.
Good to know. What's the temperature under the boiler where the pump sits ? Why is there a kit to move the pump out from beneath the boiler ?

The pictures that Brewman ! has posted are of a pretty extreme setup that is far from the norm. IMO that’s part of what drew me to the Brewtools is the modularity of their systems. If someone was worried about the controller being in harms way, it can be detached and moved to a different location. The chiller is an add-on accessory (like it is on a lot of systems out there) so you can integrate whatever you like. The drip trays are also add on accessories. I personally think they are a nice addition.
So if everything is off the shelf and modular, why do people buy a BrewTools system ? Why not just buy the parts (for a lot less) and assemble a system ? It's not like there is anything proprietary or complicated about what they have done.

For starters, if you built a system yourself, you could use 1.5" TCs instead of 34mm TCs. That alone would open a world of compatibility with other brew systems in the US.

As far as the TC fittings subject: yes the fittings are a bit of a head scratcher on the surface when it comes to the size. But, like I said before, I believe it was a decision that was made to optimize the performance of the system. But I really don’t know for sure.
Using 34mm TCs versus 1.5" TCs has *nothing* to do with system performance.

This comment leads me to think that the genetic makeup of homebrewers has changed over the years. Homebrewers used to be very, very technical and some still are. We knew BTUs, flow rates, sizes, etc. We had to, because we build our own systems, from scratch. These days there are a lot of brewers that have never assembled a system from scratch and just look at how shiny the equipment is.

As far as TC fittings on the hot side of things; I personally would take TC over NPT any day! I have taken apart threaded hot side fittings before and have been amazed at what I have found.
1) How do you clean your equipment post brewing ?

2) Have you ever seen what is in newly harvested grain ?

3) Which exact fitting are you speaking of ? Let's not forget that the water supply you drink from is assembled from NPT fittings, not triclamps. And your water isn't boiled before you drink it.

4) If you want to see grunge, pull the spool out of a ball valve. You do take your ball valves apart after every brewing session, right ?

5) Of course you want TCs over NPT. But there are these things called cam locks that work just as well or evern better for some connections. And let's not forget that that a 3 way "NPT" valve with camlocks costs ~ $45 versus $100 for a custom TC version. And the BrewTools set up uses 4 of them. And there appears to be an issue with O Rings in them.

And I’m a little anal when it comes to cleaning so it isn’t as if I neglected the process. Hot side or not, I don’t think it’s a good thing. There is a reason Breweries use them pretty much exclusively.
1) So that means home brewers should use triclamp connections everywhere ?

2) How else should breweries connect large hard piping that frequently need to be taken apart ? NPT unions ?

3) What scientific evidence do you have that NPT fittings on the hot side result in better beer ? I've been home brewing with NPT fittings for 24 years and have never had a spoiled beer. Why do I need TCs on all my hot side connections ? What leads you to think that TCs are a "good thing" ?
 
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Aerohead93

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Sure it can. Provided BrewTools stays in business and keeps selling the parts. What happens when they don't ?

Is that control IP67 rated ? How much is it to replace when it fails ?



Yipee.



Good to know.



So if everything is off the shelf and modular, why do people buy a BrewTools system ? Why not just buy the parts (for a lot less) and assemble a system ? It's not like there is anything proprietary or complicated about what they have done.

For starters, if you built a system yourself, you could use 1.5" TCs instead of 34mm TCs. That alone would open a world of compatibility with other brew systems in the US.



Using 34mm TCs versus 1.5" TCs has *nothing* to do with system performance.

This comment leads me to think that the genetic makeup of homebrewers has changed over the years. Homebrewers used to be very, very technical and some still are. We knew BTUs, flow rates, sizes, etc. We had to, because we build our own systems, from scratch. These days there are a lot of brewers that have never assembled a system from scratch and just look at how shiny the equipment is.



1) How do you clean your equipment post brewing ?

2) Have you ever seen what is in newly harvested grain ?

3) Which exact fitting are you speaking of ? Let's not forget that the water supply you drink from is assembled from NPT fittings, not triclamps. And your water isn't boiled before you drink it.

4) If you want to see grunge, pull the spool out of a ball valve. You do take your ball valves apart after every brewing session, right ?



1) So that means home brewers should use triclamp connections everywhere ?

2) How else should breweries connect large hard piping that frequently need to be taken apart ? NPT unions ?

3) What scientific evidence do you have that NPT fittings on the hot side result in better beer ? I've been home brewing with NPT fittings for 24 years and have never had a spoiled beer. Why do I need TCs on every hot side connection ?
Awe! Did I stomp on a nerve? Sorry bout that! Just trying to keep it real and put all of the FACTS in front.
 

Birrofilo

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It's not clear to me if the problem with your present Grainfather is only the failed parts or if you also want a larger kettle.

If I were you I would consider repairing the Grainfather with a 230V heater and a 230V controller.
You could buy the European versions of the spare parts and mount them by yourself.

Or you can fit a new PID instead of the original controller.

The Grainfather is, for what I read, a very decent homebrewing machine and, importantly, it also allows you to distill, by fitting to it the alembic extention or the column extension.

I have an Arsegan Easybrew30, which is the typical "Chinese kettle" sold with many other brands (Klarstein Mundschenk, Easy Grain, Browland Brew Monk, Brew Monster, AHB Brew Devil, ACE Micro Brewery, Brewster Beacon and probably others) which is OK but it's not all roses and flowers, you see here and there the cheap overall build.

Those machines do fail here and there (the pump, the controller) which is the right occasion for "pimping" them.
 

brewman !

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Awe! Did I stomp on a nerve? Sorry bout that! Just trying to keep it real and put all of the FACTS in front.
No, not at all. A discussion of facts is great.

BTW, where is the second source for a replacement heater element ?
 

Aerohead93

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Brewtools website is the only source I am aware of. Not aware of any others.
 

Reneauj62

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My 3-year-old 120V Grainfather Connect finally melted the controller plug. I was already contemplating the Grainfather G70 but apparently, there are some issues that they seem unable to fix?

I know I want to go 220V
I love simplicity and the easier they are to clean the better
5.5 and 11 gallon batches
I also really do like the delayed heating feature but not a deal breaker.
Being able to repair/replace bad parts seems important at the moment.

I'm considering the G70, Brewzilla 65L, Spike Solo, and even considering an eHERMS 3V system for sale locally but I have no idea if that is more trouble than it's worth.

What am I missing? I saw the brewtools and apparently, they aren't intended for dummies and I am a self-proclaimed DA.
I had two Grainfathers (G30) and both failed me.You need to look at the Unibrau V3 (www.brausuppy.com) I got mine and wow....talk about over-delivering. The unit is top notch. I have the 10 Gallon 220v 5500w and I was blown away. The unit is modular so you can do just about anything you want to.
 

brewman !

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The Grainfather is, for what I read, a very decent homebrewing machine and, importantly, it also allows you to distill, by fitting to it the alembic extention or the column extension.
It is true that you can fit an alembic or column extension to a Grainfather.

However, this does not make the Grainfather a great distiller. The alembic top makes it a simple pot still. While you can distill spirits with that, it takes several runs to obtain a significant amount of distillation. The T500 column is a step up from the alembic top, but not a great one. The column will provide more reflux, but it is small diameter and too short for a lot of jobs. And the Grainfather has limited mash heating power. But it will distill a mash nonetheless.

People tell me it is quite easy to convert a boil kettle to a still by soldering or welding a TC fitting to the lid, adding a method to clamp the lid down as well as a gasket and adding a modular column made of triclamp spools.
 
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Reneauj62

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Have you looked at the Unibräu? I’m leaning towards that one
I pulled the trigger on the Unibrau V3 220v 5500w 10 gallon unit right before Black Friday. This unit is a great choice for me... Phenomenal product and customer service... You can chat with the owner/developer directly. I have use it and cannot be happier.. From a former Grainfather user.
 
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