Thinking of using a 1-2 week cold crash period.

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Due to travel for the holidays I will have the chance to cold crash a cream ale for 1-2 weeks at 45 F after it has fermented for 3 weeks. I usually do a 24-48 hour cold crash for improving the clarity and I would like to know if anyone has done a 1-2 week long cold crash to give an ale some more lager like characteristics. Any thoughts? I am going to be force carbonating this beer and will be using a recipe similar to Biermuncher's Cream of the Crops corn ale but with a blend of 6 row and 2 row.
 

bobeer

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I've done it for about a week one time from due to being back logged. At a week I didn't really notice much of a difference but then again I wasn't really looking for one. I was just happy to have beer. :tank:
 
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This is just one of the times where my wife won't mind the 5 gallon bucket taking up most the space in our refrigerator. That is why I thought of trying this since I don't have a dedicated space for a lager.
 

ktblunden

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I always try to lager my cream ales for at least a couple weeks. It definitely helps.
 

Bobcatbrewing42

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Yes: I have kept a carboy chilled for two weeks to a month waiting for room in my corny keg. The resultant beer was clearer than anything else I have brewed. I'm going to try to brew with a longer lead time to give it more time on the front end and also dry hopped (or not, depending on recipe) in the keg to infuse more flavor.
I would recommend giving the carboy at least overnight up at the level that you will be siphoning into the keg so the yeast is not stirred up from the bottom.

On tap: Chocolate porter, Hopped Irish Red, and "Murphy's Too" copper colored session ale.

Fermenters 12 gal of Session IPA
 
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msa8967
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I think I am going to brew up 8 gallons and cold crash 4 gallons for 2 days and compare with the other being cold crashed for 14 days to see any differences.

Thanks to all for your replies.
 

GHBWNY

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Due to travel for the holidays I will have the chance to cold crash a cream ale for 1-2 weeks at 45 F after it has fermented for 3 weeks. I usually do a 24-48 hour cold crash for improving the clarity and I would like to know if anyone has done a 1-2 week long cold crash to give an ale some more lager like characteristics. Any thoughts? I am going to be force carbonating this beer and will be using a recipe similar to Biermuncher's Cream of the Crops corn ale but with a blend of 6 row and 2 row.
My thoughts are that a beer made with a non-lager yeast at above-lager temps will not necessarily impart "lager like characteristics".
 

DoWBrewer

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I just finished cold crashing a pale ale for about 3-weeks. I just didn't have time to get to it. It turned out great. One of the guys in my home brew club is a professional brewer and told me that most of the beers at his previous brewery would lager/cold condition for 18-days. The only difference being they transferred to a bright tank. I left my beer on the yeast. I am not sure why 18 and not 15 or 20. I think you are safe.
 

grathan

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Why would this happen? I don't follow you. I should have mentioned that each 4 gallon batch will be in a separate fermenting bucket.
IS this a normal sized fermenting bucket? that would be what like 2+ gallons worth of headspace? The fridge is gonna fluctuate temperatures causing the liquid inside to contract and expand pushing and pulling the gas in/out. It's mainly the pulling in part that creates 02 absorption on the surface area of the beer.

When I say I bet, I don't mean I am certain, but rather am casually amused by betting. I have seen beers oxidize this way. But other things factor in like kegging vs bottling after the crash.
 
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