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Things about your co-workers that annoy you

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GrogNerd

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coincidentally, I just want to let everyone know I go on vacation tomorrow.

we'll be here. Irma will be over to the right, not bothering us

we'll send you a picture of her at CPA

cancun.jpg
 

dkwolf

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Setup auto-reply in Outlook. that will let those who try to get ahold of you know you're not around and will leave everyone else the hell alone
Yes, what a novel idea. It's even company policy that we use auto-reply. But this @$$clown still feels the need to broadcast it.


Personally, I HATE using auto-reply. I make it a point to never talk about my vacations or travel plans on social media, etc. for the express purpose of not advertising when I'm not home. And then my job forces me to broadcast to every spammer that happens to hit my email address that I'm not in the office (so probably on vacation and not home).
 

GrogNerd

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went to Williamsburg to visit my Dad one Memorial Day not long ago and when we came back our front door was wide open. storm door was closed, but the main door was open almost all the way it can be

my guitar was still leaning against the wall right inside the door, so we figured nothing else was taken

our door does not face the street, it's perpendicular, so a random drive-by wouldn't have noticed.

it's just the boss and me, so I do have to inform the "entire" company.
 

Craigmn

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My boss send me emails for pricing quotes that I got 30 minutes before I left for the day and tells me in the future I can handle it. I can handle it, and I planned on handling it the next day because I spent until 5 minutes minutes before I left with an inspector so I didn't have time. He also only works may 30 hours a week.

The rest of the staff don't want to change their habits because they've been there forever and nobody made them do anything, so when I try they complain and I get undermined by my boss.

Who isn't actually my boss, in some weird cluster of dumb organization him and I are on the same level of management, and when you follow the lines I am not under his direction. But I am still expected to follow him
 

Zuljin

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I had a meeting with Bob , and he said to do this.

Well, I had a meeting with Bob, and he said to do that.

Let's call Bob.

This voice mail box is full.
 

Upthewazzu

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Personally, I HATE using auto-reply. I make it a point to never talk about my vacations or travel plans on social media, etc. for the express purpose of not advertising when I'm not home. And then my job forces me to broadcast to every spammer that happens to hit my email address that I'm not in the office (so probably on vacation and not home).
Why do you hate it so much? Outlook gives you the option of only auto-replying to folks within your organization. Also, you don't have to specify why you're out of the office. My standard out-of-office message is "Hello and thank you for your email. I am currently out of the office with limited email access. I will respond to your message as soon as I return [sometimes I'll list the return date]".

Boom, done. You could be at home sick on the couch or in the jungles of Belize. No one knows why you're gone but at least they know you're gone and aren't left hanging.
 

dkwolf

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Why do you hate it so much? Outlook gives you the option of only auto-replying to folks within your organization. Also, you don't have to specify why you're out of the office. My standard out-of-office message is "Hello and thank you for your email. I am currently out of the office with limited email access. I will respond to your message as soon as I return [sometimes I'll list the return date]".

Boom, done. You could be at home sick on the couch or in the jungles of Belize. No one knows why you're gone but at least they know you're gone and aren't left hanging.
Our company prides itself on being responsive to clients, so the auto-reply is as much, if not more, for people outside of the organization than it is inside. Anyone inside can look at our Skype app and see that I haven't been at my desk for 4 days.

An auto-reply is also, to a spammer, auto-confirmation that they hit a valid email address. And if your email signature is automatically inserted into your email (like ours is) and you can't turn it off, *BOOM*, they've got your cell phone number, too.
 

skraeling

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Lady at work is possibly the loudest eater in the history of humanity.

I mean sweet Jesus close you damn mouth when you eat.

Sounds like a nat geo special on primates across from me.

And before anyone even says anything no she’s not black that was not a joke I was making. We descended from apes.

Also has the most irritatingly consistent morning yogurt ritual.

Queue spoon on plastic cup.

Schhh schhh schhh eat
Schhh schhh schhh eat
 

slym2none

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Does she eat salad at lunch every day and attack her plate of greens like they were trying to escape?
 

Genghis

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Lady at work is possibly the loudest eater in the history of humanity.

I mean sweet Jesus close you damn mouth when you eat.

Sounds like a nat geo special on primates across from me.

And before anyone even says anything no she’s not black that was not a joke I was making. We descended from apes.

Also has the most irritatingly consistent morning yogurt ritual.

Queue spoon on plastic cup.

Schhh schhh schhh eat
Schhh schhh schhh eat
We had one of those at the office for a while. I had to avoid the lunchroom whenever he was in there. Made me nauseous.
 

dkwolf

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Had a guy working for us for a while that was the dumbest smart man I've ever known. Was a pretty good engineer, but completely OBLIVIOUS to anything going on around him. You could literally be talking about him IN FRONT OF HIS FACE and he wouldn't notice. Hated it when he parked next to you, because wherever the car stopped rolling was where he parked it. Keep in mind, I work for an engineering company. Most of us parked almost perfectly inside the lines (lined up, evenly spaced between the lines, etc.) It was nothing for him to be 20 degrees off, parked across two spaces - or sometimes, halfway up on the curb. Messiest eater I've ever seen. Our surveyor once joked that you could take one his sweaters, boil it in water, and get soup. Would regularly get those foil packets of tuna and heat up a plate in the break room. Or go grocery shopping at noon, and completely fill the (shared) freezer with his frozen dinners.

And the manspreading was the worst. Don't get me wrong, I'm a guy. I know it's nice to air the boys out. But when you're sitting on a break room chair, and basically have your legs spread out so your feet are BESIDE the chair. He would literally take up half the break room table - which would be bad enough, but he sat in the middle of the table, regardless of if he was the only person there or not.

I don't miss him at all.
 

magno

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Hah! just found this thread... I need this outlet.

I work for a small company - about 15 employees. We hired a new guy in January straight out of college. We had interviewed 2 applicants, liked the other one better, but she accepted another offer...

It became clear within his first week that he had misrepresented his qualifications at the interview, but the consensus was that he was fresh out of school, and to let him grow into the position. One of the first things that he told me on his first day was that he was "really, really smart", which I took as a sign of someone who is not actually so. We share an office, and he talks constantly, and when he isn't talking he is whistling. I've taken to wearing large headphones when I need peace and quiet.

He doesn't take direction well, and has tried to reinvent the wheel on a myriad of issues - forgetting (or ignoring) that everyone else at the office has years of successful experience at this. He regularly bites off more than he can chew, and projects and deadlines suffer for it. He refuses to work off the shared server, preferring to save his work locally, and putting it on the server when he is "done", despite repeated requests to not do so. He is nearly always the last one in, and first one out, claiming that he is working from home through the VPN, but anything that does happen from home usually requires major revision, or he has some story about software not working for him, etc. For various reasons, I have had the pleasure of working with him on most of his projects.

We had a summer intern, and several times she came to me saying that the new guy was trying to foist his work off on her. She also told me that he claimed, as a 75% deadline was coming up on a project she was working on, that he liked to be at 100% at the 75% deadline. My reply was "he doesn't know what it feels like to be at 100% at the 75% deadline". She hinted to me that she liked the work we were doing, but wouldn't accept an offer if she had to work with this guy.

He is also an expert on just about everything (just ask him). He spent a 2 hour car ride with me one time trying to convince me that vehicles with automatic transmissions get better gas mileage than those with standard transmissions (I drive a standard, he drives an automatic). Besides saying that I didn't believe that to be the case as he first mentioned it, I just let it go. He would not drop it, and had all sorts of reasons why he was right, including something about the computers in the standard vehicles activating the brakes automatically when the gears were shifted.

Unfortunately, we are super-busy, and relatively short staffed. We cannot afford to give him the boot at the moment.

/ Rant over
 

treacheroustexan

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Lady at work is possibly the loudest eater in the history of humanity.

I mean sweet Jesus close you damn mouth when you eat.

Sounds like a nat geo special on primates across from me.

And before anyone even says anything no she’s not black that was not a joke I was making. We descended from apes.

Also has the most irritatingly consistent morning yogurt ritual.

Queue spoon on plastic cup.

Schhh schhh schhh eat
Schhh schhh schhh eat
One of the new hires slurps a whole can of soup out of a bowl, no spoons involved. it's the worst.
 

skraeling

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automatic transmissions get better gas mileage than those with standard transmissions
Hes not entirely wrong. Ok I mean coming from this guy he is wrong, considering the source. It depends on the cars, but "some" autos are as good or better than their MT counterparts. Autos are not like they used to be.

Still prefer my three pedals though (+ boost).

Does she eat salad at lunch every day and attack her plate of greens like they were trying to escape?
Nope. She is however probably one of the single most neurotic people ive ever known.

We had one of those at the office for a while. I had to avoid the lunchroom whenever he was in there. Made me nauseous.
The absurd yogurt ritual is consistent, irritating, but thankfully brief. When she starts eating lunch though? I leave my desk.
 

gl_az

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Hah! just found this thread... I need this outlet.

I work for a small company - about 15 employees. We hired a new guy in January straight out of college. We had interviewed 2 applicants, liked the other one better, but she accepted another offer...

It became clear within his first week that he had misrepresented his qualifications at the interview, but the consensus was that he was fresh out of school, and to let him grow into the position. One of the first things that he told me on his first day was that he was "really, really smart", which I took as a sign of someone who is not actually so. We share an office, and he talks constantly, and when he isn't talking he is whistling. I've taken to wearing large headphones when I need peace and quiet.

He doesn't take direction well, and has tried to reinvent the wheel on a myriad of issues - forgetting (or ignoring) that everyone else at the office has years of successful experience at this. He regularly bites off more than he can chew, and projects and deadlines suffer for it. He refuses to work off the shared server, preferring to save his work locally, and putting it on the server when he is "done", despite repeated requests to not do so. He is nearly always the last one in, and first one out, claiming that he is working from home through the VPN, but anything that does happen from home usually requires major revision, or he has some story about software not working for him, etc. For various reasons, I have had the pleasure of working with him on most of his projects.

We had a summer intern, and several times she came to me saying that the new guy was trying to foist his work off on her. She also told me that he claimed, as a 75% deadline was coming up on a project she was working on, that he liked to be at 100% at the 75% deadline. My reply was "he doesn't know what it feels like to be at 100% at the 75% deadline". She hinted to me that she liked the work we were doing, but wouldn't accept an offer if she had to work with this guy.

He is also an expert on just about everything (just ask him). He spent a 2 hour car ride with me one time trying to convince me that vehicles with automatic transmissions get better gas mileage than those with standard transmissions (I drive a standard, he drives an automatic). Besides saying that I didn't believe that to be the case as he first mentioned it, I just let it go. He would not drop it, and had all sorts of reasons why he was right, including something about the computers in the standard vehicles activating the brakes automatically when the gears were shifted.

Unfortunately, we are super-busy, and relatively short staffed. We cannot afford to give him the boot at the moment.

/ Rant over
Sounds exactly like a recent MIT grad (PhD) that I just had to fire after 6 months because he couldn't compete with an amazing community college intern. Feel sorry that he wasted hundreds of thousands of dollars for an education that he will never be able to use. He'll probably end up teaching.
 

magno

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He refuses to work off the shared server, preferring to save his work locally, and putting it on the server when he is "done", despite repeated requests to not do so.
Holy hell... so today he took a bunch of work that he had been working on locally, and moved it back to the server... And, in the process, he overwrote one of the documents that I had been working on, which he had not been working on. The damn thing is about two weeks out of date now. :mad:
 

bleme

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Holy hell... so today he took a bunch of work that he had been working on locally, and moved it back to the server... And, in the process, he overwrote one of the documents that I had been working on, which he had not been working on. The damn thing is about two weeks out of date now. :mad:
Can you pull your version from last nights back-up?
 

beernutz

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My only peeves are co-workers who don't know the difference between reply and reply-all and co-workers who open their office doors (thankfully we have them and not cubicals) and then have loud phone conversations.

The former bugs me because there are a couple of co-workers who consistently do this even when the original email says to please not reply-all but instead reply directly to the sender. One of them is somewhat dense but the other just thinks the world must not be deprived of her input on any question.

To the latter, shut your freakin' door! I am trying to concentrate and I don't particularly care what you and your spouse are doing this weekend.
 

dkwolf

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Holy hell... so today he took a bunch of work that he had been working on locally, and moved it back to the server... And, in the process, he overwrote one of the documents that I had been working on, which he had not been working on. The damn thing is about two weeks out of date now. :mad:
I swear, we work for the same place. (if the staff numbers weren't drastically different). We've had guys pull the "I prefer to work on my local machine" - for various reasons, including "I don't want to mess up, if I leave a copy on the server I can mess up the local copy, and always have a backup".

We make it explicitly known that this is not allowed. Both because of the file management nightmare you just experienced, and because our local machines are not backed up - the server is. All work must be saved on the server, no exceptions.

And we had a new hire last year that I finally had to sit down and explain to him that, "You've worked here three months. We've been doing this for decades. There is literally nothing we are going to ask you to do in the next year that has not been done at least once already. There is ALWAYS an example for you to follow. Before you create a new document, come see one of us. There is one you should be using, formatted how we need it to be."

About that same time, he had been started working on a very complex, in-depth process (takes us about 4 months start to finish to get through). On the technical side of things, I *am* the office expert on it. I was gone on vacation, and he told my engineer that he was going to try and rewrite one of our calculation spreadsheets. Engineer told him no, use the sheets you were given as an example. He mentioned it to me. Told him no, there are reasons the sheets are set up the way they are. I leave on vacation for a week, and when I come back, he comes back to my desk all happy and proud of himself, because he rewrote the spreadsheet. Looked it over for a few minutes, and while it worked for that specific project, it did not take into *other* factors commonly present on those types of projects. After reviewing it, and still having this happy little puppy just beaming with pride at my desk...

Me: Do you remember Brian telling you not to spend any time doing this, just use the sheet that is already set up?
Him: Um..yeah, bu...
Me: Do you also remember me telling you that the existing sheet has been set up for a decade, and has been error-tested on over a dozen projects, and not to fix something that isn't broken?
Him: But I made it better.....
Me: After being told twice specifically NOT to spend any time on it. And it's not better. It does not allow for <situation A> <situation B> or <situation C>. There is a REASON we told you to use the templates we have set up. You don't have NEARLY the understanding of the total process you would need to start making changes. If you have questions about how a process works, or think you might have a suggestion to improve it, that's fine. But come talk to me or Brian. Because you don't know enough to know what you don't know. Now throw this away, and go back and do it the way we told you to two weeks ago.

I thought he was going to cry.
 

dkwolf

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My only peeves are co-workers who don't know the difference between reply and reply-all and co-workers who open their office doors (thankfully we have them and not cubicals) and then have loud phone conversations.

The former bugs me because there are a couple of co-workers who consistently do this even when the original email says to please not reply-all but instead reply directly to the sender. One of them is somewhat dense but the other just thinks the world must not be deprived of her input on any question.

To the latter, shut your freakin' door! I am trying to concentrate and I don't particularly care what you and your spouse are doing this weekend.
There is actually a relatively easy solution to this - but it has to be implemented by the sender. Send the email to yourself in the To: field, and use a blind carbon copy (Bcc) for everyone else. On the recipient end, it only shows that the email was sent to them, and reply all will only go back to the original sender.


And speakerphone abuse should be punishable by death.
 

beernutz

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There is actually a relatively easy solution to this - but it has to be implemented by the sender. Send the email to yourself in the To: field, and use a blind carbon copy (Bcc) for everyone else. On the recipient end, it only shows that the email was sent to them, and reply all will only go back to the original sender.


And speakerphone abuse should be punishable by death.
Agree on the use of Bcc but that would involve reversing a lifetime of my co-worker's ingrained behavior.
 

Zuljin

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"When they come for me, I'll be sitting at my desk, with a gun in my hand, wearing a bulletproof vest..
Singing "my, my, my, how the time does fly, when you know you're going to die by the end of the night."
- Catch 22
 

bleme

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There is actually a relatively easy solution to this - but it has to be implemented by the sender. Send the email to yourself in the To: field, and use a blind carbon copy (Bcc) for everyone else. On the recipient end, it only shows that the email was sent to them, and reply all will only go back to the original sender.

The problem with this method is that the people who get it can't tell that it was sent to me already, so they will then all proceed to send it to me again. Unfortunately, they do that when I am on the CC: list as well...
 

bwarbiany

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I just set my eldest son (10) up with an email address. With that came rules. One of the rules?

Don&#8217;t use &#8220;Reply all.&#8221; Many adults don&#8217;t even understand how to use this properly.
 

jschein

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Holy hell... so today he took a bunch of work that he had been working on locally, and moved it back to the server... And, in the process, he overwrote one of the documents that I had been working on, which he had not been working on. The damn thing is about two weeks out of date now. :mad:


Right click on the file go to properties and see if you crack IT staff has previous versions setup
 

GrogNerd

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me, while troubleshooting a customer's email problem: it's not just our program, this says you have an error in Outlook too

customer: it doesn't say error

me: if this pops up, it indicates an error with the username or password on the email server

customer: but it doesn't say, "error"

me: ...

hqdefault (1).jpg
 

dkwolf

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me, while troubleshooting a customer's email problem: it's not just our program, this says you have an error in Outlook too

customer: it doesn't say error

me: if this pops up, it indicates an error with the username or password on the email server

customer: but it doesn't say, "error"

me: ...
Ah yes, the infamous ID-ten-T error. Or the less common variant, PEBCAK.
 

GrogNerd

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In her defense, the problem was their email server, so no PEBCAK

But yeah... that window means something ain't right
 
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Send the email to yourself in the To: field, and use a blind carbon copy (Bcc) for everyone else. On the recipient end, it only shows that the email was sent to them, and reply all will only go back to the original sender.
I hate bcc. I've banned it for people who report to me. It's only ever used to squeal on people, or keep managers 'secretly' in the loop.

It's the cowards way out. If you're going to be a weasel, then be a weasel. Just do it so everyone knows you're a weasel. :D
 

dkwolf

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I hate bcc. I've banned it for people who report to me. It's only ever used to squeal on people, or keep managers 'secretly' in the loop.

It's the cowards way out. If you're going to be a weasel, then be a weasel. Just do it so everyone knows you're a weasel. :D
I'm glad I don't work for you.

It has its uses. In my company, it gets used more from top-down than from bottom-up. Not sure how your weasel statement applies to that.
 
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I like stuff out in the open. I like transparency.

I don't like the idea of 'lurkers' listening to my conversation without my knowledge. If I'm communicating with someone, I like to know who is in on that conversation. It's no different than a lurker on a conference call. If you want to know what's going on, step up to the plate and make yourself known. If you have an issue, address it face to face.

I try not to say anything in an email that would get me into trouble, but stuff happens. I might say something stupid if I'm upset about a situation. I'd speak differently if I knew my boss's boss was listening in.

The weasel part comes in when people use bcc to tattle on their peers. They pull a senior person into some issue being discussed to get someone in trouble. Why not just say 'Hey - I'm ccing Joe on this thread'. It's less 'weasely'.

I'll occasionally use bcc to send myself a copy of an email thread so I can archive it, but that's about it.
 

bleme

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I only use bcc when I am emailing outside the company. I want my boss to know what I told them but I don't want them to try cutting me out of the loop and talking directly to my boss.

I also use bcc if I am sending a proposal to several contractors as I don't want them to know who else I am bidding with and I am just too lazy to send the same email 12 times.
 

Zuljin

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I hate bcc. I've banned it for people who report to me. It's only ever used to squeal on people, or keep managers 'secretly' in the loop.

It's the cowards way out. If you're going to be a weasel, then be a weasel. Just do it so everyone knows you're a weasel. :D
I like stuff out in the open. I like transparency.

I don't like the idea of 'lurkers' listening to my conversation without my knowledge. If I'm communicating with someone, I like to know who is in on that conversation. It's no different than a lurker on a conference call. If you want to know what's going on, step up to the plate and make yourself known. If you have an issue, address it face to face.

I try not to say anything in an email that would get me into trouble, but stuff happens. I might say something stupid if I'm upset about a situation. I'd speak differently if I knew my boss's boss was listening in.

The weasel part comes in when people use bcc to tattle on their peers. They pull a senior person into some issue being discussed to get someone in trouble. Why not just say 'Hey - I'm ccing Joe on this thread'. It's less 'weasely'.

I'll occasionally use bcc to send myself a copy of an email thread so I can archive it, but that's about it.
All of this. It's banned at all our plants.

When everyone gets evacuated for a fire drill, and when we're all making our way back into the building a bunch of them ignore paved pathways and trample the groundcover plants.

I mean, it's a minor thing, but would it kill you go to 20 feet out of the way?
We've this one gal in support services who wears high heels. Knowing where the evac muster points are, and how far the walk can be- yeah. Not smart.
 

dkwolf

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I only use bcc when I am emailing outside the company. I want my boss to know what I told them but I don't want them to try cutting me out of the loop and talking directly to my boss.

I also use bcc if I am sending a proposal to several contractors as I don't want them to know who else I am bidding with and I am just too lazy to send the same email 12 times.
Not to mention, with a public project, you have to make sure that you provide the same exact information to all bidders. Just sent an addendum to bidders, used BCC to send the email once and make sure it was the same for all of them.
 
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