Sugar = Sugar = Sugar?

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Houblon

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Seriously, you can't taste the difference between a pure cane sugar cube and a piece of beet sugar hard candy?
First the Belgian Brewers Do Not Use hard candy, they use sacks of powder or cans of liquid sugar(s) .

A Belgian supplier of sugar(s)

BELGOSUC SUGAR SPECIALITIES
http://www.belgosuc.be/EN/productgamma.asp

If that's so, I wouldn't expect your tastebud to have a low threshold for cider either.
Now your just being a dick:mad:

I've tasted cidery fermentation. I don't need to do that again.
You screwed up and need to blame something, fine but it wasn't the sugar.
 

Scimmia

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It's a lot like Mexican Coke vs. American Coke.
Completely different issue. With this comparison, you're talking about sucrose vs high fructose corn syrup. Beet vs cane sugar is sucrose vs sucrose.
 

Houblon

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Not cool. We are talking about sugar not name calling
Just returning his attitude. I think my tastebuds are rather well tuned to beer(s)especially belgian beers giving that I take 2 trips/yr to Belgium just to visit breweries & sample beer.

see below

Seriously, you can't taste the difference between a pure cane sugar cube and a piece of beet sugar hard candy?

If that's so, I wouldn't expect your tastebud to have a low threshold for cider either.
 

a10t2

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Table sugar can go cidery if more than a pound is used per 5 gallons. Corn sugar does the same thing in the 1 to 2 pounds per 5 gallon range.
Don't tell the National-ranked BJCP judges who tasted my tripel with 2.5 lb of table sugar in 5.5 gal. They might take away my runner-up Best of Show.
 

a10t2

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In all seriousness, if anyone wants to take the Pepsi challenge on cane vs beet sugar, PM me and I'll send you three separate sets of three samples each, and you can do blind triangle tests.
 

pdxal

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I attended that seminar and Gordon Strong along with a couple other judges did in fact find differences in the beer.

There were 5 different beers with only the sugar addition being different. Made with the same base wort and the sugar was added to the primary.

Each was different. The table sugar addition was the lowest scored both by the judges and by a panel of judging that had been done in a previous panel.

I personally preferred the Belgian Candi addition and the raw sugar one. The table sugar one was not bad but lacked something.
Sorry, I forgot that critical point. They added the sugar AFTER the boil, to the primary.
Thanks for the response and information.
I'd still like to see a taste comparison, then, with the same beer made with different sugars added to the boil, like many people do. Then you'd have at least another data point and comparison of a common technique. I've heard that the wort Ph/heat would invert at least some of the sugar as well.
 

BargainFittings

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I'm racking my brain trying to remember exactly what he did to add to the primary.

I believe he boiled it in enough water and then cooled it to add to the primary.

Too many samples that weekend!
 

BargainFittings

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Thanks.

So they added to a quart and then pitched in primary when the ferment slows.

It is interesting that the brown sugar one went to 2nd place after 5 months having been last place before that.
 

King of Cascade

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Thanks.

So they added to a quart and then pitched in primary when the ferment slows.

It is interesting that the brown sugar one went to 2nd place after 5 months having been last place before that.
It does seem a bit odd that the brown sugar and corn sugar change places in month 5 after being fairly consistent.

But I was actually referring to slide 21 that said, “Cider flavors are part of Sucrose’s profile but are yeast strain dependant!” There was some discussion that this is a wives tale and it might be at some levels but it still needs to be considered. Its kind of like HSA being a myth or not possible on the homebrew scale but I avoid splashing my wort or mash around just in case.
 

BargainFittings

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It does seem a bit odd that the brown sugar and corn sugar change places in month 5 after being fairly consistent.

But I was actually referring to slide 21 that said, “Cider flavors are part of Sucrose’s profile but are yeast strain dependant!” There was some discussion that this is a wives tale and it might be at some levels but it still needs to be considered. Its kind of like HSA being a myth or not possible on the homebrew scale but I avoid splashing my wort or mash around just in case.

It would be nice to have a list of yeast with this trait of throwing cider character.
 

a10t2

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If I'm reading that correctly, they added a pound of sucrose, in a quart of water, to 5 gal of 1.009 beer, and the resulting gravity was 1.0075. That would mean that not all the sugar fermented. The FG should be 1.0051.

So maybe the measurements were wrong, but it certainly makes me wonder.
 

matiasek

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I was under the impression that corn sugar was glucose and beet sugar (often table sugar) is sucrose, a disaccharide. I do agree with many others that in through the eyes of a yeast both are very "simple" with respect to a normal wort and readily (preferentially) degraded.

I will stay away from the taste test debate.
 
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