Saflager 34/70

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bwible

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One of these days I’d like to try the “sprinkle on top” procedure with no O2. The thing is, brewing is this step by step refining of processes.

We’ve been told to “oxygenate well” for so long it somehow goes against convention. It’s hard to make yourself to do it - takes quite a bit of effort to produce a batch of beer. You think about those other past batches you suffered through (and drank anyway!)

If that batch came out weird, I’d be kicking myself for quite a while for not pulling out the O2 tank and carbonation stone setup.
I still put all my beers in “secondary” or settling carboy after primary is done. So I know what you mean. I always used liquid yeast. This might be the second time in 23 or 24 years of brewing I used dry yeast for beer. I’m excited to see the results.
 

camonick

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Just to encourage you a bit, I honestly oxygenated my wort not a single time since I started home brewing.
Me neither, don't even have the equipment to do such a thing. I just assume splashing the wort into the fermenter is sufficient. I don't rehydrate either. Dry yeast isn't really supposed to need either step.
 

Miraculix

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Me neither, don't even have the equipment to do such a thing. I just assume splashing the wort into the fermenter is sufficient. I don't rehydrate either. Dry yeast isn't really supposed to need either step.
I only rehydrate when making meads, using go ferm. But it's a completely different story, mead lacks nutrients, wort does not. For beer it goes straight into the fermenter!
 

Oleson M.D.

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In decades of brewing going back to 1990, we added 02 to the wort exactly one time.

W34/70 yeast is good. Used it many times, even won gold medals with it. But our yeast of choice now is Diamond Lager. Much better than W34/70, in our experience.
 

Miraculix

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In decades of brewing going back to 1990, we added 02 to the wort exactly one time.

W34/70 yeast is good. Used it many times, even won gold medals with it. But our yeast of choice now is Diamond Lager. Much better than W34/70, in our experience.
That one is on my list. Read good stuff about it, apparantly it also works well when fermented wam.
 

TBA

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In decades of brewing going back to 1990, we added 02 to the wort exactly one time.

W34/70 yeast is good. Used it many times, even won gold medals with it. But our yeast of choice now is Diamond Lager. Much better than W34/70, in our experience.
I am so glad to hear you like Diamond Lager. I just got one to try. Do you rehydrate or oxygenate it? What is your temperature profile?
 

Gusso

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Sounds like he doesn't oxygenate. I recently stopped and don't notice anything different. I should try Diamond.
 

Oleson M.D.

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I am so glad to hear you like Diamond Lager. I just got one to try. Do you rehydrate or oxygenate it? What is your temperature profile?
Direct pitch, only the first generation. We then harvest the yeast and re-use many, many times. Ferment temp is 48 F.
No O2 addition.
On the first pitch, two packets are used per 5 gallons.
 

jtgoral

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I am so glad to hear you like Diamond Lager. I just got one to try. Do you rehydrate or oxygenate it? What is your temperature profile?
I use both yeasts with 1qt starter. No O2. I start fermentation ~60-65F and set a BrewJacket at 50F, which is achieved next morning. After 3 days I set at 55F, then after next 3 days at 60F and then 65F for 3+ days and then keg. No secondary. Last pack of yeast goes to 2qt starter. 1qt to fermenter, 2nd for harvesting and freezing 1:1 with solution of glycerine and water (25% : 75%)
 
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TBA

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I use both yeasts with 1qt starter. No O2. I start fermentation ~60-65F and set a BrewJacket at 50F, which is achieved next morning. After 3 days I set at 55F, then after next 3 days at 60F and then 65F for 3+ days and then keg. No secondary. Last pack of yeast goes to 2qt starter. 1qt to fermenter, 2nd for harvesting and freezing 1:1 with solution of glicerine and water (75% : 25%)
Thanks for the details. Do you use a centrifuge prior to freezing?
 

jtgoral

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Thanks for the details. Do you use a centrifuge prior to freezing?
Yes, 15ml sterile from Amazon... the solution is 25% glycerine and 75% water. I fixed my post:)
 

BaldApe

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After cold crash. I’m still experimenting with the timing of that and wanted to do it on the way down but had to wait so I did it after it was at 40F for a couple days. I use 1g per gallon in 2oz water per gallon. So for this batch, 3 gal, I used 3g gelatin in 6oz water. Process I used was boil water, let cool to room temp, sprinkle gelatin, let bloom 15 mins, heat slowly to 150F, add to beer.
In my experience, gelatin is mosty effective when the beer is as close to freezing as you can get it. I use it in English ales right at 0 C.

I'm on this thread because I'm using Saflager 34/70 for the first time, and was astonished that it has achieved 83% attenuation after only only 5 days. Looks like this may not be unusual, even at 14 C.

It's an American Light Lager to commemorate my late in-laws who were Coors Light drinkers. (and to see if I can brew a really clean flavorless beer)
 
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