Protein Rest For Oatmeal

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hardrain

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(And happy holidays, by the way)

So I was going to do an oatmeal stout this afternoon...I understand for the oatmeal I should do a protein rest around 110F, but because I've never done this before:

-do I all all of the grains and get it to 110, then add water to get to 158F (my target temp)?

-or just the oatmeal (and I thought of putting in the flaked barley as well), then add the 8lb or two row and roasted malts after the 20 min rest with the hot water to get to 158F.

Thanks all.
 

rocketman768

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Bring all the grains to the protein rest temperature. This is typically 122F btw, so what you're talking about is more of a gum rest. Just do a short one...maybe 15-20 minutes. But, I think the only reason to do this is if you're worried about a stuck sparge. Otherwise, just do a single step mash.
 

PavlovsCat

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I recently did an oatmeal stout. If you use flaked oats, then you have to gelatinize them by cooking them on a baking sheet in the oven - I think it's 350 for twenty minutes, turning them a couple of times, just until they get a little toasted - , OR you could just get instant oats in the store, which are already gelatinized and add them with the rest of your grains in the mash. The oats are generally such a small part of the mash that you don't have to do a gelatin or a protein rest. I used a single mash technique and batch sparged, and had no problems with a stuck sparge.
 
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hardrain

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I don't normally have issues with a stuck sparge so I guess I'll just go with the one temp then. I'm doing a batch sparge with a converted cooler and am glad to put off the challenge today.

I've got the oats in the oven now, thanks for the suggestions guys.

Pavlov, how the stout turn out? What was your target temp? I'm shooting for 152F but am curious if you went with something different.

Thanks!
 

PavlovsCat

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My oatmeal stout is still bottle conditioning. I had a taste at 2 weeks, but it was a little green still and the carbonation wasn't finished. Target temp was 153.
 

HairyDogBrewing

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I had a hard time sparging my first oatmeal stout.
So for the next batch I did a separate cereal mash on the stovetop.
2# quick oats and 2# 6-row doughed in at 100 and kept on low heat
while the main mash was going.
The run off was still sluggish, so I might use rice hulls too, next time.
 

Bokonon

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I recently did an oatmeal stout. If you use flaked oats, then you have to gelatinize them by cooking them on a baking sheet in the oven - I think it's 350 for twenty minutes, turning them a couple of times, just until they get a little toasted - , OR you could just get instant oats in the store, which are already gelatinized and add them with the rest of your grains in the mash. The oats are generally such a small part of the mash that you don't have to do a gelatin or a protein rest. I used a single mash technique and batch sparged, and had no problems with a stuck sparge.
All of the flaked X (oats, wheat, barley) I've used have been pre-gelatinized. I'm not sure if its just the brands that I've used that have been or if they all are.
 

moger777

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All of the flaked X (oats, wheat, barley) I've used have been pre-gelatinized. I'm not sure if its just the brands that I've used that have been or if they all are.
I think if they are flaked, they are pre-gelatinized. If you buy oatmeal from the supermarket than you have to cook the oatmeal. I hear you should do the same with rice and corn. Most homebrew supply store stuff is already gelatinized.
 
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hardrain

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I think if they are flaked, they are pre-gelatinized. If you buy oatmeal from the supermarket than you have to cook the oatmeal. I hear you should do the same with rice and corn. Most homebrew supply store stuff is already gelatinized.
I picked the oats up in bulk at the store, we sometimes eat them in the AM. I have some corn from the LHBS that I'm going to be using next weekend, I'll have to call and double check to see if it has been gelatinized before packaging...thanks for the heads up.

If anyone is interested I've posted a short blurb on my brew day here:

BrewDay: Oatmeal Stout

Thanks for all your help.
 
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