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potential and yield of maltose

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ebbelwoi

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I picked up a 500g bag of maltose. It's a powdered white substance (just to be clear, it's not DME or maltodextrin).

I'm thinking I might want to use it as an adjunct at some point. What values should I enter into my brewing software for potential and yield? The numbers that are in there are at 1.041 and 88.8%. I'm pretty sure I entered those values myself, but can't remember where I got them from. Logically, though, considering that maltose is a disaccharide made from two glucose molecules, should I go with 1.046 and 100%, which are the values for glucose/dextrose/corn sugar?

Also looking for any other possible uses for maltose. I thought about using it for priming, but then I realized that the only beer I use priming sugar for is hefeweizen, and I'm happy with the results I get from dextrose for that.
 

day_trippr

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Is there a standard methodology on these things? 1.042 could be correct - depending.
Check this thread out...

Cheers!
 

Qhrumphf

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What's your actual product branding? Is truly all maltose? I've seen a product called "brewers crystals" that has been called either maltose OR glucose on packaging but is actually a mixed sugar (mostly maltose, lesser amounts of glucose and fructose, and some maltotriose/higher saccharides) approximating the composition of wort.

If your product is truly all maltose, I would expect it to ferment less than sugar but more than malt extract, probably closer to the sugar end.

And if it's a dry, crystalline sugar I'd presume it's in the 1.045 range.
 
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ebbelwoi

ebbelwoi

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The package label says

Maltose
500g
ingredients: maltose
 

Qhrumphf

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Then yeah, maybe it's all maltose. I've also seen some European/middle eastern consumer packaging saying "maltose" but the ingedient breakdown is maltose, dextrose, and a bunch of other stuff. If your package doesn't say anything else but maltose, then that might be all it is (then again, Ingredion's packaging for brewers crystals says "glucose solids" without much extra info but the product spec sheet for it is much more specific)
 
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ebbelwoi

ebbelwoi

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Thanks. I live in Japan, fwiw. The package really does say "ingredients: maltose".
 

VikeMan

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Logically, though, considering that maltose is a disaccharide made from two glucose molecules, should I go with 1.046 and 100%, which are the values for glucose/dextrose/corn sugar?
I don't know the answer for your maltose. I've never seen 100% maltose for sale, and actually doubt a little that this really is just maltose. I have seen some Asian products labelled as both "maltose" and "malt sugar" on the same label and am just wondering if (in Japan) maybe it's legal to say the only ingredient is "maltose" because its sugars are derived from malt. Maybe a language thing?

Anyway, I really just posted to say that "1.046 and 100%," which I assume is some program's verbiage for 46 PPG, would not be correct for corn sugar, which always contains some water. For the "cheap" corn sugar brewers use, 42 PPG would be about right.
 

Vale71

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With maltose there's also the question of whether it's 100% maltose or whether it contains isomaltose. As isomaltose is not fermentable this would reduce fermentability to less than 100%.
 
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