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JayZeus

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Hi Everyone!

I was fortunate enough to receive a Deluxe starter kit as a gift so I am just getting in to brewing. I made my very first batch last weekend. It was just a malt extract brew but I have been thinking about brewing non-stop ever since. I haven't even tasted my first batch and I can't wait to do my second!

I've already ordered a 10 gal Megapot and am thinking about a DIY mash tun with false bottom so I can easily do an all grain recipe.

So I've been doing a lot of reading, watching youtube, and thinking and I have some questions/thoughts...

1) Just to make sure I'm correct... the fermentation process is the yeast consuming the sugars which produces alcohol and CO2. I'm assuming you want to wait until the fermentation process has completely stopped before bottling. Meaning there is no more sugar for the yeast to consume. Is this correct?

2) If so, can you estimate how far along you are in the fermentation process by the "burp rate" of your air lock? I'm assuming if fermentation is done, your air lock should no longer bubble/burp, right?

I look forward to hearing from you guys!

20210305_192252.jpg
 

Dland

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Looks like you might be off to a good start.

Answer to both questions , a qualified yes,... go with that for now, let fermentation run its course. If you can, keep temperature stable during fermentation.

Like a lot of other things in brewing, it can get more complicated & nuanced than that, but rest assured, most of us started where you are now.

Good luck brewing & may your first beer be drinkable. {;
 

bracconiere

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welp, #1 yes, yeast like HCLF diet. but they do need the vitamins from the barley sprouts to live.

#2 i've been fermenting with a leaky lid for a while now, so not a single bubble during fermentation....i just wait about 5 days then use a hydrometer.

And, Welcome! wait till you REALLY feel the buzz! :mug:
 

Phitz

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Welcome- I just finished my second brew a few minutes ago. It’s addicting and this forum is great. As a rookie I can give you some basic answers.
1. The airlock activity is not 100% reliable, but it can be an indicator of fermentation activity. The only true way to tell it is done fermenting is to measure to take a gravity reading. Once the reading has remained the same over the course of several days it is probably done. If you bottle too early and there is still a surplus of fermentable sugars then you add more sugars you could have bottle bombs.
 

Surly

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Hi Everyone!

I was fortunate enough to receive a Deluxe starter kit as a gift so I am just getting in to brewing. I made my very first batch last weekend. It was just a malt extract brew but I have been thinking about brewing non-stop ever since. I haven't even tasted my first batch and I can't wait to do my second!

I've already ordered a 10 gal Megapot and am thinking about a DIY mash tun with false bottom so I can easily do an all grain recipe.

So I've been doing a lot of reading, watching youtube, and thinking and I have some questions/thoughts...

1) Just to make sure I'm correct... the fermentation process is the yeast consuming the sugars which produces alcohol and CO2. I'm assuming you want to wait until the fermentation process has completely stopped before bottling. Meaning there is no more sugar for the yeast to consume. Is this correct?

2) If so, can you estimate how far along you are in the fermentation process by the "burp rate" of your air lock? I'm assuming if fermentation is done, your air lock should no longer bubble/burp, right?

I look forward to hearing from you guys!

View attachment 721094
The most important thing IMHO at this point is a carboy carrier to keep you safe and brewing.
 

Calder

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Welcome to the obsession.

The airlock activity is not 100% reliable, but it can be an indicator of fermentation activity. The only true way to tell it is done fermenting is to measure to take a gravity reading. Once the reading has remained the same over the course of several days it is probably done. If you bottle too early and there is still a surplus of fermentable sugars then you add more sugars you could have bottle bombs.
Pretty good advice from a rookie.

Yes, fermentation is the yeast consuming the sugars and creating alcohol and CO2, but there is a lot more going on, and allowing the yeast time after converting the sugars helps to clean up unwanted flavors, so don't rush to bottle.
 

Surly

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Hi Everyone!

I was fortunate enough to receive a Deluxe starter kit as a gift so I am just getting in to brewing. I made my very first batch last weekend. It was just a malt extract brew but I have been thinking about brewing non-stop ever since. I haven't even tasted my first batch and I can't wait to do my second!

I've already ordered a 10 gal Megapot and am thinking about a DIY mash tun with false bottom so I can easily do an all grain recipe.

So I've been doing a lot of reading, watching youtube, and thinking and I have some questions/thoughts...

1) Just to make sure I'm correct... the fermentation process is the yeast consuming the sugars which produces alcohol and CO2. I'm assuming you want to wait until the fermentation process has completely stopped before bottling. Meaning there is no more sugar for the yeast to consume. Is this correct?

2) If so, can you estimate how far along you are in the fermentation process by the "burp rate" of your air lock? I'm assuming if fermentation is done, your air lock should no longer bubble/burp, right?

I look forward to hearing from you guys!

View attachment 721094
1) yes
2) No

Read more info on this site. You will be fine. Your enthusiasm is well noted. We are here to assist.
 

D.B.Moody

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I have a very casual attitude about brewing, but I have been brewing for a long time and I have two serious suggestions:
1. Don't even think about bottling that beer before two weeks in the fermenter. Forget about how much the airlock is bubbling or not.
2. Cover up that carboy so light doesn't get to it. A grocery bag with a hole cut in the bottom is what I use.
Welcome to the hobby.
 
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RM-MN

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I've already ordered a 10 gal Megapot and am thinking about a DIY mash tun with false bottom so I can easily do an all grain recipe.
Before you buy anything more or start a DIY project, look into BIAB. Simpler, same results. Do plan to get your own grain mill as otherwise you are dependent on the LHBS to mill your grain correctly...and they are not known for that. If you have your own mill you can bulk buy grain for quite a savings too, enough to pay for a mill in not too long of a time, depending on the mill you choose. If you want to go cheap, a Corona mill works well for BIAB and OK for a conventional mash tun. Here's an example: Corona Mill
2) If so, can you estimate how far along you are in the fermentation process by the "burp rate" of your air lock? I'm assuming if fermentation is done, your air lock should no longer bubble/burp, right?
Never go by "burp rate"!! I have one fermenter that always bubbles through the airlock, one that sometimes bubbles but most of the time not, and one that has no airlock at all. Always use a hydrometer to tell if your fermentation is over. Always! I have had one stuck fermentation where the sample was way too high gravity even though the beer had been in the fermenter for nearly 3 weeks. Had I bottled that without taking a hydrometer reading I would have lost all of it through bottle bombs.
 

hout17

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The most important thing IMHO at this point is a carboy carrier to keep you safe and brewing.
I second this get a carboy carrying strap. I to have a glass carboy and would not use it without a strap.

Note the strap in the pic below. You can grab one at Northern Brewer, morebeer or possibly at your LHBS.

PXL_20210212_111905848.jpg
 
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Coookies58

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I wholeheartedly agree with what folks are saying here. Take measurements. My 2 cents is to force yourself to go slow on purchases beyond basics. Give yourself some time to see what you really want. Otherwise you will just be buying again and have equipment picking up dust. Good luck in this hobby.
 
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J

JayZeus

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I have a very casual attitude about brewing, but I have been brewing for a long time and I have two serious suggestions:
1. Don't even think about bottling that beer before two weeks in the fermenter. Forget about how much the airlock is bubbling or not.
2. Cover up that carboy so light doesn't get to it. A grocery bag with a hole cut in the bottom is what I use.
Welcome to the hobby.
Noted. As hard as it is to be patient, I understand it is necessary.
As for light, how concerned to I need to be, like really? I used a flash in that picture so it might look bright but it is actually in a closet and doesn't get much light. Yes, it gets a little, but not much. Here is a picture from the room, no flash, at the brightest point of the day. Should I be concerned?

TIA!

darkenoughqm.jpg
 

D.B.Moody

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Didn't realize you had stuffed in a closet. You're probably okay there and your shirts must smell great! :D
I ferment in my basement because the temperature is lower and more consistent down there, but it's my work room that sometimes does see light, so I do put a bag over my carboy to protect the beer. If you want to feel good about doing this, cut the hole in the grocery bag and tell people you use a flexible, foldable, reusable, five--sided light intrusion exclusion device. Or, if you just enjoy seeing the beer working, don't cover it.
 

wallyLOZ

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Welcome to the hobby/obsession. Must agree with what everyone has already said. Most importantly, slow down and read. Not easy I know, I went too fast at the beginning and ended with seldom or never used equipment. Get, How To Brew, by John Palmer. Great reference book, and there's an older free version available online. Also look at, The Complete Joy Of Homebrewing, by Charlie Papazian. Another great reference book.
IMHO, the three best tips for a beginner are,

1) Sanitation
2) Temp control during fermentation (search for swamp cooler)
3) Patience, the hardest to obtain.

Enjoy, and keep us posted on your progress.
 
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JayZeus

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Thanks for the feedback. At this time of year, my closet is a consistent 68° so, perfect for fermenting. Unfortunately, I do not have a basement (We have a ranch style home on a slab) but I do have an extensive background in refrigeration and plan to convert an old cooler I have.

Wally, I think I'm covered on 1 and 2... Definitely need to work on number 3 though! =)
 
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