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more coffee talk - intoducing coffee at the bottling stage?

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evermuse

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I have a batch of porter that I'll be bottling this weekend and I keep kicking myself for not making it a coffee porter to start with. I got the idea in my head to brew a nice strong pot (mabey two, I like LOTS of coffee flavor) of coffee with my favorite pre-ground (that I can't find as a bean anyhow) and then toss it in with the priming solution. Is there anyone else here who's tried doing anything like this?
 
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yeah i made an oat meal stout a few weeks ago that i'm going to add coffee to. I think I will use 8 oz of coarse ground coffee in a french press and add right before bottling. I got some really good ethiopian yirgacheffe that I hope will bring out some roasted notes as well as some fruity notes.

I was worried about sanitation but every thread ive looked at makes it seem like its not that much of a concern. I will of course sanitize the press and boil the water. Cant wait!
 

C-Rider

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Cold brew your coffee and add at bottling time to the bottling bucket. Taste until you are satisfied, then bottle.
 

shorthope

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I want to try the cold-steep method and add the coffee at the bottling stage. Is it really necessary to pre-boil, then cool down, the cold brew water? Aren't I basically OK if I just use a new bottle of distilled?
 

lou2row

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why would cold steeping make a difference? Lower acidity?
reduces the oils from the beans.

Just did an oatmeal stout and added coffee at bottling. Had read from 4 oz. to 1 lb additions, so went with a 1/4 lb of Kona coarse ground and thrown in a cup and a half of vodka. Let it set for the three weeks of fermentation with a couple vanilla beans, then added. WOW! Way big coffee flavor. It tastes great, but almost all coffee taste. And the caffeine made my brothers scalp tingle (he doesn't drink much coffee). Hopefully it mellows down some in the next couple weeks.
 

yimyames

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Honestly, I have the best success adding cold-brewed ready-made coffee that you can buy at the store (the kind you mix with water or milk to make coffee). Just add to taste before bottling and it works wonderfully.
 

C-Rider

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Honestly, I have the best success adding cold-brewed ready-made coffee that you can buy at the store (the kind you mix with water or milk to make coffee). Just add to taste before bottling and it works wonderfully.
I just popped a bottle of a Stout I made which I "coffeed" at bottling time. I used cold brewed/steeped coffee that I made at home w/coffee from the Ka`u section of the island of Hawai`i. It's to die for, the coffee comes across perfect. Now to figure how to up the coccoa so I can taste it also.
 

mloster

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If you drink cold steeped coffee vs. traditionally prepared coffee, there's a noticeable difference. The cold steeped is much smoother and less harsh, even with darker roasts. So I suppose, in addition to the oils extracted (I'm not sure if cold steeping actually makes a difference on the amount of oil extracted), cold steeping affects the flavor profile in a positive manner.
 

RockSlice

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The cold steeping (I do mine in the fridge, though haven't added any to beer yet) keeps the oils thicker, so they don't leach out into the water as easily. They will still leach out, so don't leave it brewing for too long.

There's also no need to brew it as dilute as drinking coffee. No need to water down your beer.
 

jusware

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Cold steeping cuts down on the astringency and the oils from the coffee. Like it has been stated above it is much smoother. I don't bother boiling and then cooling down the water. I'm a big fan of coffee beers. I'd highly recommend trying coffee malt next time too. You can add it to any beer that calls for chocolate malt, just substitute half for coffee malt.
 

SittingDuck

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There is probably no need to boil the cold steeped coffee, but I am going to boil water to disolve the priming solution anyway, so when I add coffee, I take the cold steeped coffee off the grounds and boil it, then disolve the sugar in that. Sanitizes the coffee and avoids another cup or two of water in my beer.
 

PTBYOOJ

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reduces the oils from the beans.

Just did an oatmeal stout and added coffee at bottling. Had read from 4 oz. to 1 lb additions, so went with a 1/4 lb of Kona coarse ground and thrown in a cup and a half of vodka. Let it set for the three weeks of fermentation with a couple vanilla beans, then added. WOW! Way big coffee flavor. It tastes great, but almost all coffee taste. And the caffeine made my brothers scalp tingle (he doesn't drink much coffee). Hopefully it mellows down some in the next couple weeks.
Hmm that sounds really interesting. Why Vodka, though? Why not Bourbon or something to complement the stout/coffee flavor? :tank::drunk:
 

CDGoin

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OK.. I have seen a ton of methods, and don't want to mess up my first stout.. But its already a mess :) (long story - https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/doh-first-brew-377680/ ).

Suffice it to say I am in fermentation now, with a wort that has a VERY strong vanilla flavor and aroma.

So looking for something I can do when I either rack it or to add to it once it quits fermenting.

Since I love Pipeline porter.. the idea of adding coffee came to mind (especially since it would be a nice balance to the vanilla)

Reading everyones successes here I would love a recommendation..

Should I :

Add beans at the end of the fermentation and wait a week

or

Soak the beans in some grain alcohol or SoJu (BTW Soju is so mellow that it carries little flavor or alcoholic bite to any drink.. got hooked in Korea) and add when I rack

or

Cold brew some beans and add when I rack

Which of the three would affect carbonation the most..?
 

Gavagai

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I don't think coffee is a major concern for head-retention, but if you're worried about it, pour the cold-brew or alcohol infusion through a paper filter, which will remove most of the lipids in the coffee.

I've only used filtered cold-brew, which worked alright, but if I do another coffee beer I'll try beans in secondary. The real danger with this method is over-extraction (more than 22% of the coffee solids extracted), which results in harsh bitterness, because the least soluble compounds in coffee are also the least pleasant. To try and control the process, I'd recommend using a coarse grind with a high-quality grinder. If you don't have a burr grinder at home get it ground at a shop, because using a blade grinder will create a lot of dust, which will very quickly over-extract. Sift the ground coffee through a nylon bag, since even the best grinders produce some dust, then put the bag in secondary. Use 4 oz of ground coffee (weighed after sifting). Taste the infusion of alcohol or beer frequently as it extracts. Don't squeeze the bag when you remove it.
 

C-Rider

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I"ve done 4 coffee stouts and each time I cold brew and add to the bottling bucket. Add a little and taste. If not right add a little more. To me seems better than adding during boil or fermentation stage when you really don't know what the finished product will taste like.

You can check my recipe and just up the amount to your brew amt. But still add slowly to taste.
 
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