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Sonesen

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Okay.

i have a must of something or the other...
naturally it is 1.010 gravity....
i want 1.100 before yeast pitch
according to people on the interweb .039 points per pound or 453.592 grams of sugar (let me know if im wrong)

is there is magic equation to find out how much sugar is needed to get from one gravity to another?

I have this equation for abv that seem to work out well for me. if i have absolutely no sugars starting off...

i just want to be able to calculate the sugar i need to get get on target.... not go over... any help is good.

(letters are variables)
.039 * (A) lbs sugar = .0(B) gp / (C) gallon liquid = 0.0(D) * 131.250 = (E) abv...
.039 * 2 lbs sugar = .078 gp / 1 gallon liquid = 0.078 * 131.250 = 10.24 abv...
 

Silver_Is_Money

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Table sugar adds 46 gravity points per pound per gallon. Therefore 1 lb. of table sugar added to 1 gallon of water yields a specific gravity of 1.046.
 

RPh_Guy

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Uh? :drunk:
Look at the ingredient list on the package.
Either it's just sugar or it's sugar with corn starch. I wouldn't want to be putting corn starch in my beer or wine.
 

RPh_Guy

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If it doesn't have corn starch then it's the same as normal sugar.

Starch ...
I guess I'm not an expert but it's generally considered a bad thing in beer. The whole point of the mash is to make sure the starch converts to sugar.
It's definitely not needed for body.
 

Imhoppy

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You can make powdered sugar by grinding granulated sugar or pounding it into a fine powder.

For store bought powdered sugar, corn starch or tricalcium phosphate is added as an anticaking agent at 3 to 5% concentration to absorb moisture and to improve flow by reducing friction between the sugar crystals.

So suggest avoiding the powdered sugar for use in brewing.
 

Tobor_8thMan

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You can make powdered sugar by grinding granulated sugar or pounding it into a fine powder.

For store bought powdered sugar, corn starch or tricalcium phosphate is added as an anticaking agent at 3 to 5% concentration to absorb moisture and to improve flow by reducing friction between the sugar crystals.

So suggest avoiding the powdered sugar for use in brewing.
Great info as I didn't know/realize. Now I have concerns about using powered sugar to make my butter cream icing.
 

day_trippr

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I wouldn't be concerned, and indeed would use the finest powdered sugar in any icing or frosting for the assured smoothness.
And a little corn starch in an icing/frosting is certainly not going to hurt anything and in fact may help.

Beer, otoh? Nope. Even if one waits 'til FO any granulated sugar is going to dissolve in seconds, no point in using something ground finer if it's contaminated with corn starch for beer...

Cheers!
 

bracconiere

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1 lb of powered sugar add per gallon?
1lb or 2 cups is vastly different....powdered sugar has more volume but only because it's 'fluffy'...it's a technical term....lol, but it weighs the same

Wrote "body" as I know what corn starch will do to gravy (aka "thickens")

only after the starch has been boiled......and i doubt that much starch is added as a anti caking agent...(and who the f thinks about powdered sugar for beer? ;))
 

bracconiere

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I use powdered dextrose for priming. It dissolves very easily.
if you're trying to go from 1.010 to 1.100, you must have some sturdie bottle caps.....but i get that, like pickling salt....


edit: wait you still bottle? i didn't know that about you....lol (i'm sorry)
 

IslandLizard

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I'm curious if any of you notice this. I find all powdered sugar I've ever used having a weird floral flavor. I don't get that when powdering some table sugar in a (washed & clean) mortar. The 2 brands we got in the baking cabinet both list cornstarch as the 2nd ingredient besides powdered sugar.

There must be something in there that causes it, and I suspect it's the cornstarch.
 

RPh_Guy

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The dextrose I get from MoreBeer seems to be pure. It's perfectly clear when dissolved and it tastes very clean.

Regular pure Domino cane sugar on the other hand has a yellow tint when dissolved and has a nasty minerally taste (in RO water).
 

Dland

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If one wants a good cane sugar with taste, nutrition, and minimal adulteration, I recommend Florida Crystals evaporated cane juice. Makes anything one would use sugar for taste, cook and feel better(sugar buzz wise).
 

doug293cz

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Table sugar adds 46 gravity points per pound per gallon. Therefore 1 lb. of table sugar added to 1 gallon of water yields a specific gravity of 1.046.
Almost. One pound of sugar added to enough water to create one gallon of sugar water gives a 1.0462 SG (pure sucrose has 46.2 pts/lb.) One pound of sugar added to one gallon of water gives a solution with a Plato of (one gal of water @68F weighs 8.3304 lb):
100P * 1 lb / (1 lb + 8.3304 lb) = 10.72P => 1.0430 SG​
A 1.0462 SG solution is 11.48 Plato, so a 1.0462 SG solution from 1 lb of sucrose requires:
100P * 1 lb / (1 lb + X lb) = 11.48
1 lb = 0.1148 lb + 0.1148 * X lb
X lb = (1 lb - 0.1148 lb) / 0.1148
X = 7.71 lb of water => 7.71 lb / 8.3304 lb/gal = 0.9255 gal​
So 1 lb of sugar and 0.9255 gal of water (@68F) gives you 1.00 gal of sugar solution with SG = 1.0462.

The error in the quoted post is very common, and is due to a misunderstanding of the definition of grain and adjunct potentials given in SG. The definition is that “one pound of X will create one gal of solution/wort/must/etc. with the specified SG”, not “one pound of X plus one gal of water will result in a solution/wort/must/etc. with the specified SG.”

Brew on :mug:
 

doug293cz

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That's why I suggested using the calculator that accounts for the volume of sugar.
That calculator appears to use a sugar potential of 46.0 pts/lb rather than the more precise 46.2 pts/lb. Errors are small, but definitely better than not compensating for the sugar volume.

Brew on :mug:
 

Silver_Is_Money

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Ah, of course, I should have considered from the very onset that 1 lb. of sugar added to 1 Gal. of water would not yield 1 Gal. of sugar water.
 
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