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Southern_Junior

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I am contemplating going electric. I need someone that is an electrician to help me vet out my conversion.

I have two 50amp circuits run to the garage from the panel for a secondary Hot Water Heater. So i was hoping to add a sub/spa panel to the garage. Turn off the HWH when I am brewing, and then flip it back over when brewing is done.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. can discuss over a beer as well.
 

brewster2012

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I am not an electrician but I've been involved in industrial construction my whole career, and I'm an avid home brewer. I set up an electric brewing system in my garage (in Houston Heights) and would be glad to discuss what I did with you. You are on the right track with the spa panel approach as that gives you a GFCI which is absolutely required for safety. I feel very comfortable vetting your idea over a beer and getting you to the point where you can scope out the job and get estimates from electricians.

Please let me know if you want to have a conversation about it.
 

Bobby_M

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I am contemplating going electric. I need someone that is an electrician to help me vet out my conversion.

I have two 50amp circuits run to the garage from the panel for a secondary Hot Water Heater. So i was hoping to add a sub/spa panel to the garage. Turn off the HWH when I am brewing, and then flip it back over when brewing is done.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. can discuss over a beer as well.
Your water heater needs a total of 100 amps?
 
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Southern_Junior

Southern_Junior

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Your water heater needs a total of 100 amps?
I was shocked too. It was a secondary unit added to the house. It’s an instant hot water heater with two 50 amp feeds. I haven’t read the documentation in a while, but I believe the unit can technically run on just one. So for redundancy sake, throw two in there?
 

blasterooni

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Good Morning,
I'm an electrician in California. Your HWH requires 220v in order to run and my guess is that it draws up to 40a. Some have a dial to select how many amps it will draw depending on how fast you want you water to heat up. Now for the fix. Depending on how the circuit was run from the panel, you can do a couple of things. First, increase the amps at the panel by removing the 50a 220v breaker and replace with in a 60a (and this depends on how much your electric brewing equipment draws, if its a 220v system or a 110 system), and running the appropriate sized wire (#6; you might be able to get away with #8, which should be what is there now if the total load is on the low end) to a junction box then run one leg to the HWH outlet, and another to the outlet for the brewing equipment. However, It would be best to upgrade the breaker to the size needed and installing a small subpanel that would feed the water heater, and the brew equipment. This way, you can have 220v for the HWH, 220v for the brew equipment, and a 110v circuit for other uses.

Another thing you can do is to run a test on the HWH while it running to ascertain the load it is drawing. Turn on the HWH, then go to the panel and test each phase to see how much load is on each phase while it running. If its less than 30a per phase, and your brew equipment draws no more than 10a, you could just use the existing circuit to install a subpanel to power both pieces of equipment. Depending on certain factors, a job like this could take roughly 3-4 hours plus some material for an electrician to do.

In the meantime, find out the electrical requirements for you electric brewing equipment, whether its 220v or 110v or both, and how many amps it will draw while in use. You could send me the specs if you like, and I'll be happy to look it over, and give you an informed opinion on how to proceed safely.

Best,
M
 
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