How do you repurpose used grain?

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kevin58

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Dump it in the woods behind the house and let the critters eat it. I get to sit in the sun room and watch the deer enjoy the spent grains that went into the beer I'm sipping.
 
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Davevjordon

Davevjordon

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Unfortunately, I cannot do anything with the spent grains inside the house. "Someone" in our household does not like the smell of the mash, much less the boil. Which is why I do both outside. A lot of good ideas here for using them, though. Gotta think of some way to sneak them into food we eat without her knowing.

Thinking of using spent grains in bread reminds me of when I used to make the kids' school lunches when they were little. On tuna sandwich day, unbeknownst to them, I would mix a half cup of rolled oats in with a can of tuna, which after mixing in the mayo and putting it between two pieces of bread, looked and tasted enough like the 'real thing' that they never caught on. I could squeeze out 3 whole sandwiches from just ONE can of tuna! And still do to this day. They never knew. Until, that is... 10 years post-high school, one of my daughters was at our house to have lunch with us and since she hadn't had one in ages, I secretly made her one of my 'special' tuna salad sandwiches. She took a bite, stopped chewing, looked over at me with a frown and said very adamantly, "DAD!! What. Is. In. Here??!!" I said, "Whadaya mean, 'what's in there?'" She just sat there staring at me, half-angry and half-frightened with a huge immobile bulge in her cheek until I 'fessed up. When I did, she spit it out on the plate, screamed and jumped up from the table and ran to the sink to wash out her mouth! When I told her she had been eating that for all her life, she said, "DAD!!! that is SO GROSS!!!" Boy, talk about ungrateful!
Just a suggestion:
After you dry the grain, I found the best way to grind it into a flour is with a coffee bean grinder. (Works better than a Ninja) The flour could be used in a lot of ways: incorporate into pizza dough, bread dough, cookie dough, fried chicken.
 

bpgreen

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Glysophate is active for a very short period of time. It's also water soluble, so any that may have been sprayed on the barley plants would be long gone by the time you've got spent grain (even if it were still active). So there shouldn't be any danger in applying them to your lawn.

I've used spent grain on my lawn by just carrying a bucket and flinging it around. It's a mild fertilizer, but is probably more useful for its organic content. If you use it this way, you don't need to dry it. And since it's such a mild fertilizer, it doesn't really matter much whether you get it distributed evenly.

I've also added them to the compost pile and used them to fertilize my hop bines (that seems fitting somehow).

I also make dog treats using this recipe (more or less):
https://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum/threads/spent-grain-make-your-best-friend-cookies.87097/

I use peanut butter powder instead of peanut butter, but that's because I don't eat much peanut butter, but use the powder in smoothies and pancakes.

When my dog was alive, she'd go crazy on brew day as I got closer to making the treats. She loved them all the time, but especially when they were fresh.

After she died, I stopped making them for a long time, but I've been walking a lot lately and a lot of people take their dogs for walks on the trails I walk, so I've started carrying treats for the dogs (always check with the owners first).

I used them to make bread a few times, but I don't eat much bread anymore.

I dry them in the oven or a dehydrator and add about 1/4 cup to smoothies. I also add them to pancakes. If I'm being really lazy, I'll add them to smoothies directly, but I usually run them through the coffee grinder first.

I've tried making veggie burgers and falafels from the brooklyn brewery site, but wasn't really happy with the results.
 

gunhaus

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I use mine to support my local economy, and a large number of people in it. I place my grains in a bag, then I place them in a dumpster. The dumpster is owned by a small family owned company that employs about 2 dozen or so people who depend on the fairly good paycheck (Especially for THIS area) they earn. The truck drives to a landfill where a couple dozen more people are gainfully employed in the daily operations - including a close family friend that runs the commercial gate. The garbage company pays local, state and federal taxes, plus donates generously to a number of local causes. The employees spend their checks in the local stores, shops, and businesses like mine, thus supporting even more people. They too pay taxes, and contribute to the local economy. The deer, squirrels, and bunnies, have plenty of natural food. I hate granola. I like the people in my community and like to see them with jobs. I figure my two or three small bags of wasted grains every month or so is helping to keep upwards of a hundred people gainfully employed - perhaps more when the secondary, downstream spending is calculated in. Plus the collateral contribution to government, church, and charity programs, is almost beyond measuring. BEHOLD - the power of beer, when properly applied!!!
 

6Tap

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I give my spent grains to my coworker who feeds it to his cows, pigs and chickens and in return I get free beef!
 
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