How do you repurpose used grain?

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

OP
Davevjordon

Davevjordon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2017
Messages
115
Reaction score
43
Location
Portsmouth
This is is why I did only the back yard and only a small amount. I used maybe 3 or 4 big handfuls for roughly 150 square feet of lawn 3 days with a day in between each dose.
I feel like I drink and brew too much beer... or I need a couple hundred acres of yard.
 

ancientmariner52

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Apr 6, 2014
Messages
1,283
Reaction score
1,126
Location
Western Arkansas
Anybody else remember Raw Bits? One of Garrison Keilor's imaginary sponsors for the Prairie Home Companion radio program. Made of oat hulls and wheat chaff, you had to send in a resume to prove you were tough and rugged enough to eat it. I used to have an 'I Qualified For Raw Bits!' tee shirt.
 
OP
Davevjordon

Davevjordon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2017
Messages
115
Reaction score
43
Location
Portsmouth
I feed it to my chickens , they love it .

That fried chicken looks pretty tasty tho :)
The chicken was good, and the grain works well with it, really. I just need to be better at frying.
If you can fry chicken and make it crispy, you can probably make this incredible. It added a different flavor. I really liked it. I just need to get better at frying.
 
OP
Davevjordon

Davevjordon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2017
Messages
115
Reaction score
43
Location
Portsmouth
I was looking at the beautiful bread in post 24. I'll try the granola bars, too. Thank you.
You’ll love the granola bars, I promise.
I have to go back and edit that. Forgot to mention: I also toasted almond slices. And toast the oats by coating lightly with olive oil, toss in the oven on a cookie sheet.
After a couple trials, you’ll figure out how to toast those things. The oats are simple. Almonds... you don’t want to overdue them. I recommend in a dry pan on the stove so you can flip them and keep an eye on them. To toss them: just pour into another container and pour back into a pan! (I had enough bits of almonds bouncing onto the stovetop)
Sesame seeds, definitely in a pan, stirring constantly.
 
OP
Davevjordon

Davevjordon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2017
Messages
115
Reaction score
43
Location
Portsmouth
I turn the spent grains into milk. That is, I feed them to my goats and they give me milk back! I've never seen a goat drool until I started giving them the spent grain.
That’s pretty awesome. I’ll ask my neighbor tomorrow when he’s gonna get some goats.
 
OP
Davevjordon

Davevjordon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2017
Messages
115
Reaction score
43
Location
Portsmouth
That looks good enough to eat.

So, hulls and all, huh? I'm really lazy, so I use a bread machine. Do you replace flour with spent grain? What proportion for a trial run? Do you add extra sugar to make up for 'expended' grain?
Wet grain, hulls and all. As I recall, I still used some flour, and liquid ingredients had to be skewed because there was liquid in the grain. Sorry I don’t have a recipe. I found one online and went with it.
 

chewse

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2013
Messages
275
Reaction score
53
Location
Longmont
Dog treats....the day before brew day, my "co-brewer (my beautiful wife) posts on the neighborhood website that we are brewing and stop by to pick up a bag of spent grain for making dog treats. I put 4 cups of spent grain in each zip lock bag and my wife prints off copies of the dog treat recipe for those who want to bake the biscuits. Brew day is like a neighborhood get together. Now if I can only get them to help me clean the brew equipment afterwards....;-)
 
OP
Davevjordon

Davevjordon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2017
Messages
115
Reaction score
43
Location
Portsmouth
Dog treats....the day before brew day, my "co-brewer (my beautiful wife) posts on the neighborhood website that we are brewing and stop by to pick up a bag of spent grain for making dog treats. I put 4 cups of spent grain in each zip lock bag and my wife prints off copies of the dog treat recipe for those who want to bake the biscuits. Brew day is like a neighborhood get together. Now if I can only get them to help me clean the brew equipment afterwards....;-)
That’s a really great idea!
I’ve seen the dog treat recipes, but I’m talking about sharing with neighbors!
Our dog is diabetic [emoji849] so I’m not going to walk on those eggshells. But I would totally share with the neighborhood! Thanks!
 

jordankempp

Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2017
Messages
15
Reaction score
1
Dog treats....the day before brew day, my "co-brewer (my beautiful wife) posts on the neighborhood website that we are brewing and stop by to pick up a bag of spent grain for making dog treats. I put 4 cups of spent grain in each zip lock bag and my wife prints off copies of the dog treat recipe for those who want to bake the biscuits. Brew day is like a neighborhood get together. Now if I can only get them to help me clean the brew equipment afterwards....;-)
Wow! What a great idea! I’m trying to figure out a way to make dog treats in a greater scale as my two love them!
 

Kent88

Sometimes I have to remind myself
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
May 13, 2014
Messages
5,273
Reaction score
4,352
Location
Midwest USA
Search around here, I think I've been a part of at least 3 or 4 threads about spent grain that went on for several pages.

I usually throw it in a low oven right after I finish sparging, run it through the food processor, and use a little bit when I make pizza dough, waffles, any bread product that sounds good that you add sauce (or syrup, I guess) to help moisten things up.
 

wyowolf

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2012
Messages
931
Reaction score
156
Location
Atlanta
Additional tips:
Drying spent grain: spread thin on a cookie sheet, put your oven on low (200 or less) View attachment 547774
This will take a couple hours.
Stir about every half hour (the grains toward the outer edges of the cookie sheet will dry faster than those in the middle). Stir every half hour or so until they’re all dry.
Store in a container.
Right after brewing, you’re not about to spend a day drying grain. Store in gallon freezer bags until ready to use.
To turn dried spent grain into flour, a coffee grinder worked 1,000 times better than the Ninja blender/processor/ whatever you call it.
View attachment 547777
so you can just dry them in the oven and use them for baking afterwards??
 
OP
Davevjordon

Davevjordon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2017
Messages
115
Reaction score
43
Location
Portsmouth
so you can just dry them in the oven and use them for baking afterwards??
Sure can! For longer term storage, you have to either dry or freeze the grains. You just want to make sure they’re fully dry so they don’t mold.
And the dried grain tastes great!
I also recommend (if you make the granola bars) take any of the crumblies you end up with, and toss them on top of some yogurt.
 

SPav

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Feb 3, 2016
Messages
14
Reaction score
3
Dog treats....the day before brew day, my "co-brewer (my beautiful wife) posts on the neighborhood website that we are brewing and stop by to pick up a bag of spent grain for making dog treats. I put 4 cups of spent grain in each zip lock bag and my wife prints off copies of the dog treat recipe for those who want to bake the biscuits. Brew day is like a neighborhood get together. Now if I can only get them to help me clean the brew equipment afterwards....;-)
We make dog treats and gave sample bags of treats out to friends a couple months ago. Had one friend ask if I ever have extra spent grains to let her know so she can make her own dog treats. I do like the idea of letting people know of your brew schedule ahead of time.

BTW, my wife tells me when I need to brew when the dogs start running low on treats
 

Northern_Brewer

British - apparently some US company stole my name
Joined
Aug 16, 2017
Messages
3,117
Reaction score
2,387
Location
UK
Probably true, but they'd have to test for it specifically.

I recall this from last year: https://naturalnews.com/2016-04-13-...ve-toxic-chemical-levels-in-their-bodies.html

Obviously the source is a bit biased, but this was reported elsewhere too.
More than a bit biased, they're trying to make people afraid so they forgot to mention this reality check in the original Reuters article :

Germany’s Federal Institute for Risk assessment said the levels did not pose a risk to consumers’ health.
“An adult would have to drink around 1,000 liters (264 U.S. gallons) of beer a day to ingest enough quantities to be harmful for health,” it said in a statement."
It's easy to scaremonger that something causes cancer, but if it's only present in tiny quantities then the actual risk is minimal, and far less than the risk of crossing the road. Things like chilli peppers and beans would fail modern food safety tests, but we accept the "dangers" because the benefits outweigh the risks. People who are worried about glyphosate, should be more worried about hydric acid, which kills many more people than glyphosate and is present in homebrew at much higher levels, even when it's brewed with organic barley.

Going back on topic, I generally put my spent grains around the bottom of the bird table, it soon seems to go. I know someone who is a sporadic pig keeper, I'm waiting for them to get a new litter in as the one thing better than grain for eggs is grain for bacon!!!
 

Exception13

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Oct 9, 2012
Messages
87
Reaction score
41
Location
Westport
Dog treats. We call them Brewscuits. The neighbour's chocolate lab goes nuts over them. Although, truthfully, she is a Lab.... and will go nuts over most food. We don't own a dog, so the Brewscuits get doled out to friends who have dogs. Kinda liking the idea of giving them grains and the recipe though. [emoji4]

My sister has chickens, so sometimes there is an egg/grain swap. The rest goes to. The compost pile.


20171113_061517_001.jpg
 

olephart

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2016
Messages
167
Reaction score
87
Thinking about trying a extract, "brew in bag" coconut stout. That chocolate malt and flaked oat meal might just make a taisty breakfast, (the toasted coconut will be in the primary for the first five days).
 

Rhaop

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2012
Messages
628
Reaction score
226
Location
Baltimore
Dog treats. We call them Brewscuits. The neighbour's chocolate lab goes nuts over them. Although, truthfully, she is a Lab.... and will go nuts over most food. We don't own a dog, so the Brewscuits get doled out to friends who have dogs. Kinda liking the idea of giving them grains and the recipe though. [emoji4]

My sister has chickens, so sometimes there is an egg/grain swap. The rest goes to. The compost pile.


View attachment 548018
Those look great any particular recipe you follow?
 

r4dyce

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2017
Messages
287
Reaction score
108
I forget what it's called but Brooklyn Brew Shop has a blog with spent grain recipes. I've found grains from a stout work great in bananas bread. Others from lighter beer make an ok pizza crust.
 

GHBWNY

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2014
Messages
2,227
Reaction score
851
Location
Western New York
Unfortunately, I cannot do anything with the spent grains inside the house. "Someone" in our household does not like the smell of the mash, much less the boil. Which is why I do both outside. A lot of good ideas here for using them, though. Gotta think of some way to sneak them into food we eat without her knowing.

Thinking of using spent grains in bread reminds me of when I used to make the kids' school lunches when they were little. On tuna sandwich day, unbeknownst to them, I would mix a half cup of rolled oats in with a can of tuna, which after mixing in the mayo and putting it between two pieces of bread, looked and tasted enough like the 'real thing' that they never caught on. I could squeeze out 3 whole sandwiches from just ONE can of tuna! And still do to this day. They never knew. Until, that is... 10 years post-high school, one of my daughters was at our house to have lunch with us and since she hadn't had one in ages, I secretly made her one of my 'special' tuna salad sandwiches. She took a bite, stopped chewing, looked over at me with a frown and said very adamantly, "DAD!! What. Is. In. Here??!!" I said, "Whadaya mean, 'what's in there?'" She just sat there staring at me, half-angry and half-frightened with a huge immobile bulge in her cheek until I 'fessed up. When I did, she spit it out on the plate, screamed and jumped up from the table and ran to the sink to wash out her mouth! When I told her she had been eating that for all her life, she said, "DAD!!! that is SO GROSS!!!" Boy, talk about ungrateful!
 

urg8rb8

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2014
Messages
1,206
Reaction score
120
I throw it into the lake in the back of the house for the fish to eat.
 

TimmyWit

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jan 26, 2009
Messages
597
Reaction score
332
Location
Fairview Heights
This is a cut and paste from a recipe I found online years ago. I couldn't attach the word doc so I'll just leave the whole thing here. This stuff is always a hit. You have to plan it out a day or two ahead of time but it's worth it. While it comes out great with any grains, I have preferred the results using grains from stouts. For a nice twist, put cheese on it in step 3 before you roll it. If you happen to have some left in the morning, pan fry it with some buttah or bacon grease for breakfast, especially the stuff with cheese in the middle.

It doesn't take much grain for this though. Most of mine gets fed to the wildlife and I have also made dog biscuits. I never thought about giving them to someone with chickens. That's a great idea!

--------------------------------

*Note that you can freeze spent grain, and then thaw it out again before using in this recipe. It’s best to bring it up to room temperature before you start baking.

Sponge:
1/2 tsp active dry yeast (not rapid rise)
3/4 c water (room temperature)
3/4 c spent grain from brewing, still damp and at room temperature
1 1/2 c bread flour

Dough:
4 cups bread flour
1 cup water (room temperature)
2 tbsp honey
2 tsp salt

For the Sponge:
Mix the yeast into the water in a medium bowl until it’s dissolved. Mix into the flour and spent grain with a spatula and create stiff, wet dough. Cover and let the sponge sit at room temperature for at least five hours, if not overnight. I let mine sit for 24 hours.

For the Dough:
1. Mix the water, honey, flour, and the sponge in the bowl of a mixer, using a spatula. Mix the dough with your dough hook attachment on a slow speed for about 12 minutes, then add the salt. Continue mixing with the dough hook for another 3 minutes.

During the course of this process, the dough should be sticking to the bottom of the bowl, but easily clearing the sides. Check about halfway through by pushing the dough off the hook and seeing how it sticks to the bowl. If it’s really gluey and damp, add more flour in 1/8th cup increments, mixing between each addition. You want a dough that’s smooth and tacky but not actually glue-like.

2. Transfer your dough to a big lightly oiled bowl, and cover it with plastic wrap that’s been greased. Let it rise about two to four hours, until it has roughly tripled in size.

3. Grease three 9 x 5 inch loaf pans. Put your dough on a lightly floured surface. Working with floured hands, press it out into a rectangle, and use a bench knife to divide it into three equally sized pieces. Roll each piece of dough into a tight 9-inch cylinder and pinch the seam closed. Place the loaves, seam side down, in the prepared pans. Set each loaf into a greased 9 x 5-inch loaf pan. Cover loosely with a cloth or greased piece of aluminum foil and let the dough rise until it almost doubles in size, about 45 minutes.

4. Meanwhile, put a deep metal pan or cast-iron skillet on the lowest shelf of the oven. Heat your oven up to 450 degrees F. Heat up two cups of water (not quite to boiling) and keep it on hand for your baking cycle.

5. Cut two or three slashes on top of each loaf using a sharp serrated knife. Cut almost parallel to the top of loaf, not very deep, and without sawing or tearing. Put your loaves in the oven. Pour two cups of hot water into your pre-heated pan or skillet, to create steam.

6. Bake for 15 minutes, then, if the loaves are browning unevenly, rotate each loaf 180 degrees. Bake for another 5-10 minutes (or until tops of loaves turn dark brown) and test the temperature with an instant read thermometer — 205-210 degrees F is perfect.

7. Take your pans out, let them cool 10 minutes, then put loaves on a cooling rack for an hour or two. Voila! Serve with local honey and/or butter, or make delicious little sandwiches.
 
Last edited:

r4dyce

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2017
Messages
287
Reaction score
108
I've made several baked goods and pizza dough. The only one I really thought came out well was a chocolate chip banana bread with spent grains from a stout.
 

nealm

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 14, 2013
Messages
89
Reaction score
9
Location
Washington,DC
Made some dog biscuits for my daughter in laws dog. She asked me a week later to stop because they were giving the dog the trots. Oh well.
 

Latest posts

Top