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Gunpowder flavor in stout - yeast or grain bill?

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I'm hoping this is the best section to ask this question, I think I have an ingredient issue.

Oatmeal stout, recipe as follows:
8.0 lbs Golden Promise
2.0 lbs Munich
1.0 lbs Oatmeal flakes
1.0 lbs Pale Chocolate
1.0 lbs Flaked Barley
0.50 lbs Roasted Barley
0.25 lbs Crystal 40
0.25 lbs Crystal 80
0.5 lbs Lactose
2 oz. Williamette 4.2% for 60 minutes to give ~ 32 IBU estimated
Safale S-05 (on top of failed Wyeast 1335 British II)
First run in an Anvil Foundry which I'd cleaned and rinsed pretty well I think
Filtered water with minor additions to approximate numbers agreed upon here in earlier threads by the masters

Brew day seemed to go well. Mashed an hour at 155, boiled an hour, cooled quickly, etc. Hit 1.065 OG and 1.022 FG (expected 1.018 but add a few points for the lactose = hit my numbers). Around 6% ABV. Taste tests along the way indicated I'd have a yummy stout coming up.

The only issue was that the 1335 British II yeast, smacked the night before, didn't swell up. I pitched it anyhow, hoping it was just a little lazy, but 24 hours later (at 68F) there was no activity. I had a couple backup packets of S-05 just in case, and threw them in (online calculator I believe recommended a yeast amount that came right out to be 2 packets). Had activity in 12 hours and full fermentation rocking within 24. Tapered off after about 3-4 days. Let it sit in the primary at about 70 degrees for 3 weeks, watched it get quite clear. Then kegged it, force carbed, chilled, and served my first glass last night (with a bent dip tube to ensure I didn't suck up a bunch of yeast). So far so good.

But it's got a gunpowder smell and flavor. Like... a toy cap gun. Maybe small fireworks.

S-05? The failed Wyeast 1335? I've never used flaked barley before, could that be it? Any chance I didn't clean my fancy new electric brewer well enough? Researching seems to say gunpowder is a yeast issue, and just wait it out, so I will. I know 3 weeks is a bit early for a 6% stout to be great, but I didn't expect it to flat out suck. Just hoping to identify something I can be sure to NOT repeat the next time.
 
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Miraculix

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My guess is, that you're describing a sulphur smell. This can happen if yeast gets stressed. Some yeasts tend to produce it more easily than others, us05 however shouldn't produce it, at least I have never had this with this yeast and also never read about it. I don't know the other yeast you used but my guess is, that this one was the problem as it already sounded stressed due to the non swelling package.

Sometimes it's dissipating with time. Sometimes people gently stir the finished beer with a sanitised copper pipe which will bind the sulphur in one or two minutes. You can do this before bottling or kegging. But I would first try to wait it out. Stout is anyway mostly better when aged a bit.
 

Dland

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If it were me, I'd cold crash it and let it condition for a few weeks.

The more appropriate and more conventional approach for style would be to condition for a while at "cellar temp" , as best you can do between 40 & 60 F.

My guess sulfur is likely from yeast and how it reacted to given ingredients. Whatever the cause, stouts, like other dark & complex ales, benefit from conditioning as much as lagers.
 
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Thanks guys for the responses. After the 3 weeks (2-1/2 of them post any noticeable fermentation happening) at around 70 degrees, I kegged it (closed transfer), force carbed overnight, and then chilled it down to the upper 30's. It was a day later that I had my first pour.

I actually brought it back up to room temp, figured that would help speed up any reactions still going on. Normally things happen faster warmer than they do cooler. As for beer specifically, I know it's complex so I'm not sure which way is "best". I do live in MN so maybe I'll place it in the back of a cabinet at ground level against an interior wall, and let it sit a while. It's as close as I can get to 40 - 60, the alternative is to go in the garage where it dips below freezing at night, sometimes well below.

I'm pretty curious about the copper thing. I have access to some small copper rod and it'd be easy enough to swirl around. Follow up with a few CO2 purges I suppose. But no idea how much time is the right amount of time. Minutes? Hours? I'll try to be patient though and give it a few more weeks. I do know beer changes, just didn't expect it to basically suck right off the bat. I too think yeast is the culprit in some manner or another. Maybe the Wyeast did eventually get going, and let me know how underpitched it was.
 

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I'd just just leave it alone and let it rest, assuming it is carbonated already, in as cool place as is convienient. Check it out in a few weeks, if you like the way it is going, give it some more time, drink when needed.
 

Miraculix

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Thanks guys for the responses. After the 3 weeks (2-1/2 of them post any noticeable fermentation happening) at around 70 degrees, I kegged it (closed transfer), force carbed overnight, and then chilled it down to the upper 30's. It was a day later that I had my first pour.

I actually brought it back up to room temp, figured that would help speed up any reactions still going on. Normally things happen faster warmer than they do cooler. As for beer specifically, I know it's complex so I'm not sure which way is "best". I do live in MN so maybe I'll place it in the back of a cabinet at ground level against an interior wall, and let it sit a while. It's as close as I can get to 40 - 60, the alternative is to go in the garage where it dips below freezing at night, sometimes well below.

I'm pretty curious about the copper thing. I have access to some small copper rod and it'd be easy enough to swirl around. Follow up with a few CO2 purges I suppose. But no idea how much time is the right amount of time. Minutes? Hours? I'll try to be patient though and give it a few more weeks. I do know beer changes, just didn't expect it to basically suck right off the bat. I too think yeast is the culprit in some manner or another. Maybe the Wyeast did eventually get going, and let me know how underpitched it was.
A I said, minutes should suffice. You should actually be able to smell the result as the sulphur smell should be completely gone by then.
 
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